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NEWS
October 31, 1990
Travelers looking for "best bets" books, street maps and other guides to their destinations now have a place in Orange County to stop before they go. "We carry the world," said Guita Mahmoudi, assistant manager of the new Rand McNally store in South Coast Plaza. The atlas publisher's new outlet is one of just nine in the country and the first in a mall.
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HOME & GARDEN
March 5, 2011 | By Sam Watters, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Egypt is captivating America. It has for more than a century. Just look at this room fit for a pharaoh and built by a mogul in Altadena. After the Civil War, the country roared to global prominence with manufacturing wealth and a lot of showing off by the rich. One of the flashier men at the top was the cofounder of the Rand McNally map company, Andrew McNally. In 1880, he rolled into town from the Midwest and later picked up 15 acres along Mariposa Street. He lured his friends to adjoining luxury lots and made it a millionaires' row. By East Coast standards, Mariposa was a country lane.
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BUSINESS
April 8, 2003 | From Reuters
Rand McNally & Co., the world's largest seller of maps, Monday exited bankruptcy protection after less than two months and is now under the majority ownership of Los Angeles-based buyout firm Leonard Green & Partners. The company's plan, which received the unanimous support of senior and subordinated lenders, converts much of the company's $350-million debt load to equity. Founded in 1856, Rand McNally comes out of bankruptcy protection with about $100 million of debt.
BUSINESS
October 16, 2006 | Dave Carpenter, The Associated Press
As the Great Chicago Fire was ravaging the city in 1871, William Rand and Andrew McNally saved their business by burying two printing machines on the sandy Lake Michigan shore. No such clear-cut solution emerged to preserve Rand McNally & Co.'s dominance more than a century later, when the mapmaker lost its way in the age of the Internet. But after two ownership changes and a bankruptcy reorganization, the storied company appears to have regained its bearings.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1992
Regarding "Here Comes the Judd," by Robert Hilburn (April 12): As a Judds fan, I was surprised to find that Wynonna Judd thinks Wynona, Okla. (whose name you say she adopted), is the same town cited in the pop song "Route 66." Either Hilburn is misinformed or both he and Wynonna are. The song "Route 66" refers to Winona , Ariz., just east of Flagstaff. As we all know, the lyrics are ". . . Flagstaff, Arizona; don't forget Winona. . . ." All the cities in the song are mentioned in order as they appear along the route going from east to west.
TRAVEL
October 25, 1987 | BILL HUGHES, Hughes is a 25-year veteran travel writer living in Sherman Oaks.
From statistics and mail received, it seems that many mature travelers are making their vacation holidays do double duty these days--using them to relax as well as help plan for retirement. The newest reference available is the new Rand McNally "Retirement Places Rated" ($12.95), by Richard Boyer and David Savageau. It researches 131 places in 38 states that reflect the preferences of many mobile retired persons.
TRAVEL
May 3, 1998
Rand McNally has issued its first road atlas showing mountains and other topographic relief--just a few months after National Geographic debuted what it claimed was the first nationwide atlas with such features. Like Geographic's atlas, the Rand McNally version has a spiral binding, a heavy-duty cover and costs $14.95. But it adds Web sites and toll-free phones for tourism offices, hotel chains and other sources.
NEWS
November 16, 1990 | KATHRYN BOLD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Rand McNally went looking for the best place to open its seventh store, the company's maps pointed to Orange County. "People here are globally oriented. They're more sophisticated, and they have the money to travel," says Steven Newman, manager of the new Rand McNally Map & Travel Store in South Coast Plaza, Costa Mesa. Since Rand McNally opened the store in September, Newman has been amazed at the boundless curiosity of his worldly clientele. "They're information-starved," he says.
BUSINESS
January 15, 2003 | Josh Friedman, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles buyout firm Leonard Green & Partners said Tuesday that it had reached a deal in principle to obtain control of Rand McNally & Co., the world's largest commercial mapmaker, as it seeks to broaden its lineup of consumer-oriented companies. If completed, the deal would finish a process Green began a year ago when it started buying Rand McNally debt. Peter Nolan, a managing partner at Leonard Green, called the 147-year-old mapmaker, which is also publisher of Thomas Bros.
BUSINESS
November 13, 1998 | LESLIE EARNEST and KEVIN BAXTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Thomas Bros. Maps, whose thick, detailed guidebooks have helped millions of Angelenos navigate Southland freeways for decades, is being acquired by global map maker Rand McNally & Co., the companies said Thursday. Rand McNally is expected to push the privately held Irvine company into a more ambitious effort to develop sophisticated high-tech tools to guide motorists. Although Thomas Bros.
BUSINESS
April 8, 2003 | From Reuters
Rand McNally & Co., the world's largest seller of maps, Monday exited bankruptcy protection after less than two months and is now under the majority ownership of Los Angeles-based buyout firm Leonard Green & Partners. The company's plan, which received the unanimous support of senior and subordinated lenders, converts much of the company's $350-million debt load to equity. Founded in 1856, Rand McNally comes out of bankruptcy protection with about $100 million of debt.
BUSINESS
January 15, 2003 | Josh Friedman, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles buyout firm Leonard Green & Partners said Tuesday that it had reached a deal in principle to obtain control of Rand McNally & Co., the world's largest commercial mapmaker, as it seeks to broaden its lineup of consumer-oriented companies. If completed, the deal would finish a process Green began a year ago when it started buying Rand McNally debt. Peter Nolan, a managing partner at Leonard Green, called the 147-year-old mapmaker, which is also publisher of Thomas Bros.
MAGAZINE
October 13, 2002 | RENEE VOGEL
Part of the price of being a tourist is often hauling around bulky guidebooks and trying to decipher unwieldy street maps. Now the innovative InsideOut City Guides give travelers a sense of direction without the hassle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2001 | JON THURBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Andrew McNally III, who led Rand McNally & Co., one of the world's best-known map makers, through its largest period of 20th century growth, died Thursday in Chicago. He was 92, and the family attributed his death to natural causes. The great-grandson of the firm's co-founder, McNally succeeded his father, Andrew McNally II, as president of the company in 1948. The firm was looking for ways to diversify, and one of McNally's first moves was to buy the W.B. Conkey Co.
MAGAZINE
March 18, 2001
Want to make your next long road trip a little more civilized? Let those short people in the back seat entertain themselves with the GeoSafari World Challenge. The fast-paced electronic game poses more than 7,500 questions about countries and landmarks. A track-ball globe provides clues for those who need help conquering the world. * GeoSafari World Challenge, $44.95 from Rand McNally in Century City, (310) 556-2202, www.randmcnally.com; requires 4 AA batteries; ages 8 and up.
BUSINESS
March 30, 1999
Global map maker Rand McNally & Co. said Monday it completed its acquisition of Irvine-based Thomas Bros. Maps, whose guidebooks have helped drivers navigate the region's roadways for decades. Thomas Bros. Maps will continue to operate out of its Irvine headquarters as a wholly owned subsidiary of its Illinois-based parent. Gil Richter of Thomas Bros. Maps has been named vice president and general manager of the new subsidiary. Terms of the acquisition were not disclosed.
BUSINESS
October 16, 2006 | Dave Carpenter, The Associated Press
As the Great Chicago Fire was ravaging the city in 1871, William Rand and Andrew McNally saved their business by burying two printing machines on the sandy Lake Michigan shore. No such clear-cut solution emerged to preserve Rand McNally & Co.'s dominance more than a century later, when the mapmaker lost its way in the age of the Internet. But after two ownership changes and a bankruptcy reorganization, the storied company appears to have regained its bearings.
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