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Rand Miller

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August 21, 1994 | David Colker, David Colker is a staff writer in The Times' Valley office and writes the Cyburbia computer column in Life & Style
The Miller brothers, Rand and Robyn of Spokane, were unlikely candidates to be the first super stars of the CD-ROM world. They were neither obsessed by computers at an early age nor were they any better than mediocre students in school. They were never pocket protector-wearing nerds, and the churchgoing brothers were certainly never part of the hacker underground. But they shared an appreciation for storytelling and had well-developed imaginations.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 1994 | David Colker, David Colker is a staff writer in The Times' Valley office and writes the Cyburbia computer column in Life & Style
The Miller brothers, Rand and Robyn of Spokane, were unlikely candidates to be the first super stars of the CD-ROM world. They were neither obsessed by computers at an early age nor were they any better than mediocre students in school. They were never pocket protector-wearing nerds, and the churchgoing brothers were certainly never part of the hacker underground. But they shared an appreciation for storytelling and had well-developed imaginations.
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BUSINESS
November 9, 2003 | Alex Pham, Times Staff Writer
Brian Fargo is a grown-up kids might envy. His ride to work is a black 450-horsepower Cadillac Escalade with seven video screens. His office two blocks from the surf in Newport Beach is stocked with video game consoles, classic arcade machines, free snacks and a shower so he can wash up after boogie boarding. At 40, Fargo himself would be considered a kid by most business executives. In the youth-crazed video game industry, though, he's a geezer.
NEWS
May 17, 2001 | AARON CURTISS, aaron.curtiss@latimes.com
An otherwise intelligent and insightful person once described "Myst" as the coffee-table book of video games--meaning one of the most popular computer titles in history was pleasant enough to look at, but really not that deep or compelling. He, like many who bought the original game, simply wandered around ogling the beautiful scenery, bored by the languid pace and stumped by often-obscure puzzles that made it difficult to progress very far into the rich story that made "Myst" interesting.
NEWS
May 17, 2001 | ALEX PHAM, alex.pham@latimes.com
In 1993, "Myst" entranced a worldwide audience with its lush graphics, intriguing story line and accessibility for people who had never played computer games. Created by brothers Robyn and Rand Miller, "Myst" was followed four years later by "Riven," a game in the same mystery and puzzle-solving genre as "Myst," but with even more eye candy. "Myst" sold 5.5 million copies, but "Riven" sold only 4.5 million--mostly because many players found the puzzles too difficult.
BUSINESS
June 21, 2000 | E. SCOTT RECKARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moving from one fantasy realm to another, the producer of Disneyland's lavish Indiana Jones Adventure ride has left Walt Disney Co. to oversee an online "world" being developed by the creator of computer games Myst and Riven. Former aerospace engineer Susan Bonds, who recently produced another "E-ticket" Disney ride simulating a space voyage, will Susan Bonds work on a Cyan Inc. project code-named Mud Pie, a multiplayer game set in an ever-evolving Internet world.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 1997 | MARK GLASER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With movies, sequels usually are less engaging than the original. But with CD-ROMs, sequels can often best the originals, because technology improves over time and gamers provide useful feedback. Doom II, Red Alert and Rebel Assault II all were improvements on a successful formula. The fall slate of titles has even more outstanding sequels to tide you over till the holidays. The most anticipated follow-up is Riven (Cyan/Red Orb), the sequel to 1993's best-selling Myst.
BUSINESS
December 22, 1997 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's Christmas 1996. Dozens of U.S. computer game makers, bogged down by soaring production costs, failed to finish their hottest titles before the holidays. A few products sold big. Yet most of retail's precious shelf space was crowded with hundreds of ho-hum products that generated a lukewarm buzz among shoppers. A year later, things look great. Fans are overwhelmed by a bounty of selections. Game makers excitedly release a stream of eagerly anticipated sequels.
BUSINESS
June 23, 1997 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two years ago, visitors to the giant Electronic Entertainment Expo could hardly escape the constant boasts that this game or that game was destined to be "the next Myst," the subdued, surrealistic adventure that became the first true mega-hit of computer gaming. This year, though, no one made that claim. Not even the folks actually producing the next Myst, a sequel called Riven. In fact, they take minor offense at the label, preferring to call their endeavor "the first Riven." Whatever.
NEWS
November 29, 2001 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Giving video and computer games as gifts can be dicey business. Unless you're working off a list made by the recipient, the odds are high of making a big, non-returnable mistake. This year, goofs can be even more costly as hundreds of thousands of families mull which console to buy--or whether to bother. The newest set-top consoles range from $200 to $300, but that's just for the base system. Most buyers spend an additional $100 or so on games and extra controllers.
BUSINESS
June 12, 1994 | AMY HARMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When International Creative Management agents Bill Block and Steve Stanford arrived at the Medford, Ore., airport last month to find a white limousine awaiting them, they were mortified. Expensive cars are not generally a source of anxiety for talent agents.
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