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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1997
Before immigration proponents denounce the Rand study (Sept. 15), they should carefully read the proposal. The suggestion is to decrease new legal admissions to California to a "moderate range," not to stop immigration altogether. It appears to me that our efforts should be to assimilate new arrivals rather than continue our "open door" policy of the past 20-plus years. In addition to the concern regarding the shift in the California economy away from low-skilled jobs toward service and technology industries, there are environmental concerns as well.
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BUSINESS
April 8, 2014 | Michael Hiltzik
The long-awaited Rand Corp. study of Obamacare's effect on health insurance coverage was released Tuesday and confirmed the numbers that had been telegraphed for more than a week : At least 9.3 million more Americans have health insurance now than in September 2013, virtually all of them as a result of the law. That's a net figure, accommodating all those who lost their individual health insurance because of cancellations. The Rand study confirms other surveys that placed the number of people who lost their old insurance and did not or could not replace it -- the focus of an enormous volume of anti-Obamacare rhetoric -- at less than 1 million.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2006 | Jennifer Oldham, Times Staff Writer
Security experts released their third warning in as many years Friday that passengers in line in lobbies and on sidewalks at Los Angeles International Airport are vulnerable to luggage or car bomb attacks. They also recommended, for the second time, that airlines add ticket agents and the federal Transportation Security Administration hire more screeners to speed travelers to secure gate areas. "The crowded public areas at LAX continue to be an attractive target for terrorist bombs," Rand Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2014 | By Tony Perry
The nation needs to better acknowledge and support the efforts of the "hidden heroes" from the Iraq and Afghanistan wars: the estimated 1.1 million civilian, volunteer caregivers tending to the needs of wounded and disabled veterans, according to recommendations contained in a Rand Corp. study released Monday. While family members and others have long cared for veterans, the veterans from two recent wars are more likely to have mental health and substance problems, making the task of providing care even more difficult, according to the study, funded by the Elizabeth Dole Foundation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2014 | By Tony Perry
The nation needs to better acknowledge and support the efforts of the "hidden heroes" from the Iraq and Afghanistan wars: the estimated 1.1 million civilian, volunteer caregivers tending to the needs of wounded and disabled veterans, according to recommendations contained in a Rand Corp. study released Monday. While family members and others have long cared for veterans, the veterans from two recent wars are more likely to have mental health and substance problems, making the task of providing care even more difficult, according to the study, funded by the Elizabeth Dole Foundation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1992
While drinking coffee, I gazed at the morning Times (Jan. 18) and was struck by two sections juxtaposed on the kitchen table: the editorial commenting on the RAND study discussing the failure of U.S. strategy in El Salvador, and next to it the article in the Business section describing the increase in terrorist attacks on our business people overseas. It seems apparent that the primary cause of these attacks on Americans outside the U.S. is our own foreign policy. After generations of mucking around in other countries' internal affairs, is it any wonder that they would be at least a little peeved?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1995
Re the RAND study mentioned in "Old and Broke" (editorial, July 26): I hope you'll give this subject more coverage. How many, ages 50 to 69, have had to pillage their savings, including 401(k) or 403(b) plans, in attempting to hang onto their home equity over the last five recessional years here in Southern California? How much in early withdrawal penalties has been paid out by children of those whom were less prosperous because of the 1930s Depression? How many were already in an unplanned, early retirement?
BUSINESS
September 6, 1992
I did not share the sense of outrage that employees cost more to companies because of wrongful-firing litigation expressed in the article, "How Employer Fears of Wrongful-Firing Cases Eliminate Jobs" (July 21). The story is written from the perspective of the plantation owner who finds that the uppity ideas of his "employees" are costing him money. Naturally, these people (the employees) are just harming themselves, since the result will be less hiring. It kind of makes the corporate megalomaniac in all of us pine for more arbitrary days, when discrimination was rife and considered good for business.
NEWS
April 8, 1988
A decade ago the Rand Institute came out with a similar opinion to Fingarette's. I wonder how many people read the Rand study, and buoyed by assurances that they could drink socially, continued to drink themselves into insanity or death? The Rand study was a great disservice 10 years ago, and Fingarette's opinions are a great disservice today. To suggest to me that now that I have achieved 4,110 days of continuous sobriety, I might consider having a social drink now and then is the ultimate insult.
OPINION
July 14, 1996
In Frank del Olmo's analysis of the disparity between Latino and other immigrant groups in education and later success and failure (Commentary, July 8), he neglects to mention the single largest difference between Latinos and other groups: bilingual education. Bilingual education began in the '60s and '70s as a good-hearted effort to engineer a better result for the Latino community, but resulted in an erosion of education in English language skills. Other immigrant groups, notably Asians, were placed in schools and forced to mainstream in English-only curricula.
OPINION
September 24, 2011
A Rand Corp. study this week seemed to nip the conventional wisdom about medical marijuana dispensaries in the proverbial bud, contradicting statements from law enforcement officials that these facilities are magnets for crime. On the contrary, Rand researchers said, crime actually increased in the vicinity of hundreds of L.A. dispensaries after they were ordered to shut down. Does this mean that dispensaries decrease neighborhood crime rather than increasing it? Unfortunately, despite Rand's analysis, we still don't know the answer.
BUSINESS
January 29, 2011 | Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
Many California doctors are making large profits by prescribing and directly dispensing custom-made "compounded" drugs to people with work-related injuries, according to a new Rand Corp. research report. Use of these pricey drugs ? mostly painkilling creams for patients who might need an alternative to pills ? has soared in recent years, driving up costs in California's workers' compensation system and alarming some legislators, who are now looking to rein in their use. Rand was hired to do the study after lawmakers asked the California Commission on Health and Safety and Workers' Compensation to look into the compounded-drug trend.
BUSINESS
October 6, 2009 | Jerry Hirsch
A regulation banning the establishment of new fast-food restaurants in South Los Angeles is unlikely to curb obesity rates, according to a study by researchers at Santa Monica think tank Rand Corp. Concerned about high levels of obesity, the lack of traditional grocery stores and a proliferation of fast-food eateries, the Los Angeles City Council approved a moratorium on new fast-food restaurants in one of the poorest sections of the city last year. It has extended the ban through March of next year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2008 | Steve Hymon, Times Staff Writer
More toll lanes, one-way streets, pricier parking and bus-only lanes are the best short-term fixes to keep traffic moving in the Southland, according to a study released today by the Rand Corp. There are few ideas in the study that haven't been floated before by a variety of interest groups -- "floated" being the key word. But Rand researchers say that with little room to build or expand roads in Southern California, the only real option is a coordinated effort to better manage traffic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2007 | Claire Noland, Times Staff Writer
Konrad Kellen, a political scientist and research analyst at the Rand Corp. who studied the Vietnam War and later devised anti-terrorist strategies for the federal government, died Sunday of age-related causes at his Pacific Palisades home, his family said. He was 93. Brian Jenkins, an international terrorism expert and colleague, said Kellen often took a contrarian or independent view among the intellectuals engaged in research and debate at the Santa Monica-based think tank.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 2006 | Mary Engel, Times Staff Writer
With each generation in the United States, adolescents from Asian immigrant families improved their health habits, while their Latino counterparts either showed no improvement or developed worse habits, according to a Rand Corp. study released Tuesday. The study, which looked at diet, exercise, television viewing and other practices among at least three generations of youths aged 12 to 17, could help explain rising rates of obesity and diabetes among Latinos.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1995
Your April 13 editorial, "Another Nod Toward No-Fault," continues the notion propagated by the insurance industry that no-fault will reduce auto insurance premiums. The facts tell another story. According to the National Assn. of Insurance Commissioners, states with no-fault laws saw their automobile liability rates increase an average of 30.9% between 1989 and 1992. That is an average increase of more than 10% per year. States without no-fault saw rates go up an average of just over 7% per year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 2006 | Evelyn Larrubia, Times Staff Writer
Healthcare for illegal immigrants between the ages of 18 and 64 cost American taxpayers $1.1 billion in 2000 -- or about $11 per household -- according to a study released Tuesday by the Rand Corp. The research, published in the November/December edition of the journal Health Affairs, put the cost in Los Angeles County that year at $204 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2006 | Jennifer Oldham, Times Staff Writer
Security experts released their third warning in as many years Friday that passengers in line in lobbies and on sidewalks at Los Angeles International Airport are vulnerable to luggage or car bomb attacks. They also recommended, for the second time, that airlines add ticket agents and the federal Transportation Security Administration hire more screeners to speed travelers to secure gate areas. "The crowded public areas at LAX continue to be an attractive target for terrorist bombs," Rand Corp.
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