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ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1998 | By Randal Kleiser
Twenty years ago this summer, Paramount released a musical by a first-time feature director that would go on to become one of the biggest box-office hits ever. "Grease," based on the smash Broadway musical, rode the appeal of its stars, John Travolta and Olivia Newton-John, as well as hit singles "You're the One That I Want," "Hopelessly Devoted to You" and "Grease," and was the last true blockbuster musical film. On March 27, Paramount will re-release the newly refurbished film.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1998 | By Randal Kleiser
Twenty years ago this summer, Paramount released a musical by a first-time feature director that would go on to become one of the biggest box-office hits ever. "Grease," based on the smash Broadway musical, rode the appeal of its stars, John Travolta and Olivia Newton-John, as well as hit singles "You're the One That I Want," "Hopelessly Devoted to You" and "Grease," and was the last true blockbuster musical film. On March 27, Paramount will re-release the newly refurbished film.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1998
In Randal Kleiser's article on "Grease," the song "Sandy" is credited solely to Louis St. Louis (" 'Grease' Is Still the Word," March 15). The song was actually co-written with Scott Simon of Sha Na Na. Screamin' Scott deserves his due. Also, Sha Na Na, which I have been a member of for 29 years, contributed six performances of songs from the original Broadway production and other rock 'n' roll classics to the enduring "Grease" soundtrack: "Blue Moon,"...
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 1991 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Return to the Blue Lagoon" (citywide) spends the first 43 of its 101 minutes pretending to be a sequel when it really wants to be a remake. A straightforward sequel would find Brooke Shields and Christopher Atkins' shipwrecked youngsters now well into adulthood and, provided they hadn't been rescued, coping with everyday existence in an isolated South Sea island paradise, which might just not be all that idyllic.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1992 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Nothing can be more galling than elephantine whimsy--and "Honey, I Blew Up the Kid" (citywide) offers up what seems like several tons of kitschy kootchie-koo. A follow-up to the 1989 Disney studio hit "Honey, I Shrunk the Kids," its plot may be an ultimate example of wretched excess: A 112-foot-high, 2-year-old boy marches on Las Vegas while his parents try desperately to save him from the local military-industrial complex. Did we say excess?
NEWS
March 9, 1992 | BETTY GOODWIN
The Scene: Launch of a Paul Schrader "mini-film festival" at the Directors Guild Thursday night. The weekend-long event, conceived by American Cinematheque, kicked off with the L. A. premiere of the director-writer's newest movie, "Light Sleeper," which explores some intriguing personalities in New York's drug world. The Buzz: Hollywood economics. The movie's distributor, Seven Arts, no longer exists, and the film's American release date has been postponed to August.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1990 | David Pecchia \f7
Highlander II (Davis-Panzer). Shooting in Argentina. Russell Mulcahy, director of the 1986 original, which stiffed here but scored big overseas, returns with Christopher Lambert and Sean Connery reprising their respective characters. Time traveling again presents the spine of the film with past, present and future all getting ample screen time. Producers Peter S. Davis and William N. Panzer. Also stars Virginia Madsen and Michael Ironside. The Invisible Maniac (Smoking Gun). Shooting in L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1987 | CONNIE BENESCH
Films by seven now-noted directors made during their student days at the USC School of Cinema-Television will screen at a benefit Tuesday at the new AMC Century 14 Theaters complex in Century City. The program, which begins with a 7:30 p.m. reception, will feature 15- to 20-minute works written and directed between 1967 and 1987 by George Lucas ("Star Wars"), Robert Zemeckis ("Back to the Future"), Randal Kleiser ("Grease") and Albert Magnoli ("Purple Rain").
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