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Randal Lee

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BUSINESS
November 22, 2001 | Walter Hamilton
Randall R. Lee was named Wednesday as the new director of the Securities and Exchange Commission's regional office in Los Angeles. Lee, 40, succeeds Valerie Caproni, who left in July for a private law firm in New York. Lee will assume his new post next month. Since 1994, Lee has worked in the criminal division of the U.S. Attorney's Office in Los Angeles.
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BUSINESS
November 22, 2001 | Walter Hamilton
Randall R. Lee was named Wednesday as the new director of the Securities and Exchange Commission's regional office in Los Angeles. Lee, 40, succeeds Valerie Caproni, who left in July for a private law firm in New York. Lee will assume his new post next month. Since 1994, Lee has worked in the criminal division of the U.S. Attorney's Office in Los Angeles.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1999 | EVELYN LARRUBIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Lancaster skinhead who beat a homeless man to death with a board because of the color of his skin was convicted Thursday of premeditated, racially motivated murder, guaranteeing him a lifetime in prison. The verdict, which prosecutors said marked the first time in memory that a jury in Los Angeles County has convicted anyone of a racially motivated killing, came one day after a Wyoming man was convicted of beating a gay man to death.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1999 | EVELYN LARRUBIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Lancaster skinhead who beat a homeless man to death with a board because of the color of his skin was convicted Thursday of premeditated, racially motivated murder, guaranteeing him a lifetime in prison. The verdict, which prosecutors said marked the first time in memory that a jury in Los Angeles County has convicted anyone of a racially motivated killing, came one day after a Wyoming man was convicted of beating a gay man to death.
BUSINESS
January 9, 2001
Randal Lee has assumed the presidency of the Greater Los Angeles chapter of the newly renamed CCIM Institute, an organization of commercial real estate executives and professionals that was formerly known as the Commercial Investment Real Estate Institute. This year CCIM will focus on education and "establishing a common language" to clear up misunderstandings about certain terms used by commercial real estate professionals, according to Lee, who is president of Lilly Enterprises Inc.
BUSINESS
September 25, 2001 | Jesus Sanchez
A company controlled by real estate investor David Lee boosted its already sizable portfolio of mid-Wilshire-area properties last week by purchasing a 12-story Wilshire Boulevard high-rise for about $24.2 million, according to property records and people familiar with the transaction. The 308,000-square-foot Wilshire Serrano Building at 3699 Wilshire Blvd. is almost fully occupied. The previous owner was Operating Engineers Pension.
BUSINESS
March 20, 2001
* The Operating Engineers Pension Trust sold the 200,000-square-foot Wilshire Centre Building at 3055 Wilshire Blvd. in Los Angeles to 3055 Wilshire LLC for $12 million. Ron Buss of Buss-Shelger Associates represented the seller. The buyer was represented by Randal Lee of Lilly Enterprises Inc. * S.S. Rainbow II LP, a San Mateo, Calif.-based private investor, purchased the 53,484-square-foot Art Institute Building of Los Angeles/Orange County at 3601 W. Sunflower Ave.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 2000 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Cultivate perfection. . . . Never accept failure except as a growing experience. . . . Make it happen now," advised the perfume-scented cards that the attractive, elegantly dressed millionaire distributed. "The greatest deterrent to your success is yourself," she told the 200 young women attending the first West Coast Chinese American Women's Conference meeting at Cal State L.A. that day in 1982. Lilly V.
BUSINESS
October 10, 2006 | Roger Vincent, Times Staff Writer
The San Gabriel Valley, boasting strong job growth but relatively little new housing in recent years, will soon see one of its largest residential projects. Construction is expected to begin next year on a $189-million, 351-unit condominium complex in Alhambra. The units are to be priced from about $400,000 to $900,000. Los Angeles developer Ratkovich Co. said last week that it planned to build the complex at an office park called the Alhambra, which occupies the 45-acre former campus of C.F.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1997 | JOHN DART
Tensions can erupt within a church when building costs rise, the music program goes contemporary or an AIDS outreach is planned. But invite a biblical scholar to lead seminars distinguishing the historical Jesus from the Christ of church tradition--as a Van Nuys church is doing Sunday--and you are taking "spiritually risky" steps by challenging long-held beliefs, says church member Randal Lee Cummings, who teaches religion courses at Cal State Northridge.
BUSINESS
June 26, 1989 | BILL SING, Times Staff Writer
For years, many Hong Kong-owned companies have been reluctant to invest large sums in Southern California or elsewhere in the United States, seeing investment returns back home in the colony as superior and fearing being labeled as unpatriotic. But the recent violence and unrest in China is making those few Hong Kong companies that have invested large sums here feel somewhat vindicated. Take International Landmark Group. The company, which years ago began developing shopping and housing projects in Los Angeles' Chinatown and Monterey Park, is working on new residential and shopping complexes in Los Angeles and Oakland.
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