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Randall Dale Adams

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NEWS
April 6, 1989
Assistant Dallas County prosecutor Winfield Scott, who helped prosecute "Thin Blue Line" defendant Randall Dale Adams, was fired by Dist. Atty. John Vance because of what Vance described as disagreements over the Adams case and other matters. His firing, effective immediately, came a day after two other prosecutors involved in the case resigned for undisclosed reasons.
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NEWS
August 26, 1990 | Kevin Thomas
In his taxing, fascinating 1988 film, Errol Morris builds a powerful case against Texas-style justice while attempting to bring to the documentary form an ultra-cool, neo-film noir look. The result is an experiment in non-fiction screen narrative that yields darkly amusing observations of Americana that are so characteristic of the filmmaker.
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NEWS
February 25, 1989 | From Associated Press
A man whose conviction for the slaying of a police officer was questioned in the movie "The Thin Blue Line" was denied parole Friday. The Texas Board of Pardons and Parole voted 2 to 1 to deny parole for Randall Dale Adams because of the nature of the crime and use of a weapon in it, board spokeswoman Karin Armstrong said. Adams has maintained that he is innocent of the 1976 shooting of Dallas police officer Robert Wood.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1989 | DANIEL CERONE and SHAUNA SNOW, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Return to the Scene of the Crime: Randall Dale Adams, who was freed from prison after his case was documented in the movie "The Thin Blue Line," said it felt strange to return to the city last weekend where he was convicted of killing a policeman. Adams' first visit to Dallas since his release from state prison last March was because of a benefit dinner for an organization that investigates the cases of people who may have been wrongly convicted. "Being back here is a little strange.
NEWS
August 26, 1990 | Kevin Thomas
In his taxing, fascinating 1988 film, Errol Morris builds a powerful case against Texas-style justice while attempting to bring to the documentary form an ultra-cool, neo-film noir look. The result is an experiment in non-fiction screen narrative that yields darkly amusing observations of Americana that are so characteristic of the filmmaker.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1989 | DANIEL CERONE and SHAUNA SNOW, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Return to the Scene of the Crime: Randall Dale Adams, who was freed from prison after his case was documented in the movie "The Thin Blue Line," said it felt strange to return to the city last weekend where he was convicted of killing a policeman. Adams' first visit to Dallas since his release from state prison last March was because of a benefit dinner for an organization that investigates the cases of people who may have been wrongly convicted. "Being back here is a little strange.
NEWS
March 23, 1989 | Associated Press
Former Death Row inmate Randall Dale Adams said Wednesday that he wants to go home to Ohio and never return to Texas, the state that imprisoned him for 12 years for a crime he says he did not commit. However, Adams, who was released from a Dallas prison on Tuesday, said he is not bitter about the past and believes a new trial on charges of killing a police officer would further clear his name. Shortly after his release, Adams flew to Houston to meet with his attorney.
NEWS
August 4, 1989 | From Associated Press
Former Death Row inmate Randall Dale Adams settled his lawsuit against the man who helped free him, "The Thin Blue Line" filmmaker Errol Morris, by getting the rights to his life story, attorneys said Thursday. Adams, whose conviction of killing a Dallas police officer was questioned in Morris' film, will receive full rights to any commercial movies or books about his life, according to the settlement. Charges against Adams ultimately were dismissed.
NEWS
March 21, 1989 | from Associated Press
A judge's last-minute intervention kept Randall Dale Adams in prison Monday as he was about to walk free after serving 12 years in prison on a controversial conviction for the killing of a police officer. District Judge Ron Chapman reset Adams' bond at $100,000, superseding another judge's decision to release Adams simply on a promise to appear in court.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Randall Dale Adams, who was freed from prison after his guilt in slaying a police officer was questioned in the movie "The Thin Blue Line," is suing the film's producer to regain the rights to his life story. The lawsuit, filed in state district court in Houston, alleges that Errol Morris of Massachusetts lost the rights last December by failing to exercise an option to extend a two-year agreement.
NEWS
August 4, 1989 | From Associated Press
Former Death Row inmate Randall Dale Adams settled his lawsuit against the man who helped free him, "The Thin Blue Line" filmmaker Errol Morris, by getting the rights to his life story, attorneys said Thursday. Adams, whose conviction of killing a Dallas police officer was questioned in Morris' film, will receive full rights to any commercial movies or books about his life, according to the settlement. Charges against Adams ultimately were dismissed.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 1989 | DANIEL CERONE
After spending 13 years in a cell, waging a legal war against the Dallas County justice system that wrongly convicted him of murdering a police officer, Randall Dale Adams is still fighting for his life--or more appropriately, his life story.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Randall Dale Adams, who was freed from prison after his guilt in slaying a police officer was questioned in the movie "The Thin Blue Line," is suing the film's producer to regain the rights to his life story. The lawsuit, filed in state district court in Houston, alleges that Errol Morris of Massachusetts lost the rights last December by failing to exercise an option to extend a two-year agreement.
NEWS
April 6, 1989
Assistant Dallas County prosecutor Winfield Scott, who helped prosecute "Thin Blue Line" defendant Randall Dale Adams, was fired by Dist. Atty. John Vance because of what Vance described as disagreements over the Adams case and other matters. His firing, effective immediately, came a day after two other prosecutors involved in the case resigned for undisclosed reasons.
NEWS
March 24, 1989 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, Times Staff Writer
The man whose wrongful conviction became a celebrated case because of a movie won his unconditional freedom Thursday, but not before a series of events that cast a pall on the Dallas justice system. All charges against Randall Dale Adams, convicted in 1976 of murdering a policeman, were dropped by Dallas Dist. Atty. John Vance, who said there was not enough evidence to justify a retrial.
NEWS
March 23, 1989 | Associated Press
Former Death Row inmate Randall Dale Adams said Wednesday that he wants to go home to Ohio and never return to Texas, the state that imprisoned him for 12 years for a crime he says he did not commit. However, Adams, who was released from a Dallas prison on Tuesday, said he is not bitter about the past and believes a new trial on charges of killing a police officer would further clear his name. Shortly after his release, Adams flew to Houston to meet with his attorney.
NEWS
March 22, 1989 | from Associated Press
Randall Dale Adams, who once was three days from execution for the slaying of a police officer, was freed Tuesday under a court ruling that he didn't get a fair trial. "This is something I've dreamed about for 12 1/2 years," Adams said after the release order was cleared in some last-minute legal action. "It's here, but give me a little bit of time to think about it."
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