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Randall Kennedy

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August 29, 2013 | By Erin Aubry Kaplan
Why is America so intent on killing affirmative action? Randall Kennedy's clear-eyed new book, "For Discrimination," offers many reasons, among them: As a remedy for racial injustice, albeit a modest one, affirmative action invokes slavery and, therefore, rattles the philosophical foundation of democracy and fairness upon which much of America believes the country was built. Another reason is that affirmative action is seen as increasingly incompatible with the aims of the so-called post-racial age in which a first black president would seem to argue against any more need for racial redress.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2013 | By Erin Aubry Kaplan
Why is America so intent on killing affirmative action? Randall Kennedy's clear-eyed new book, "For Discrimination," offers many reasons, among them: As a remedy for racial injustice, albeit a modest one, affirmative action invokes slavery and, therefore, rattles the philosophical foundation of democracy and fairness upon which much of America believes the country was built. Another reason is that affirmative action is seen as increasingly incompatible with the aims of the so-called post-racial age in which a first black president would seem to argue against any more need for racial redress.
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BOOKS
January 20, 2008 | Erin Aubry Kaplan, Erin Aubry Kaplan is a contributing editor to The Times' Opinion pages.
HARVARD University law professor Randall Kennedy closes his new book "Sellout: The Politics of Racial Betrayal" with a confession he should have made in the beginning: He himself has been accused of selling out. That's not surprising, given that among the many definitions of a black sellout he offers is having an Ivy League pedigree like his.
BOOKS
January 20, 2008 | Erin Aubry Kaplan, Erin Aubry Kaplan is a contributing editor to The Times' Opinion pages.
HARVARD University law professor Randall Kennedy closes his new book "Sellout: The Politics of Racial Betrayal" with a confession he should have made in the beginning: He himself has been accused of selling out. That's not surprising, given that among the many definitions of a black sellout he offers is having an Ivy League pedigree like his.
BOOKS
February 3, 2002 | ISHMAEL REED
Six years ago, Robert S. Boynton in the Atlantic Monthly nominated a group of new black intellectuals whom he hailed for going beyond race to look at the "commonality of American concern." Yet if race were placed in the background of their work, none of the writers and thinkers he mentioned would be in business. Americans are fascinated with race, and so it is inevitable that merely placing the word "nigger" on the cover of a book guarantees controversy and book sales.
NEWS
January 11, 2002 | LAUREN SANDLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
'Deep in the streets" is not how anyone would describe Randall Kennedy. Each morning he commutes from his home in suburban Boston to Harvard Law School. His office there is a cacophony of casebooks and culture. Sarah Vaughan tapes and Philip Roth novels join the clutter that surrounds his large desk. He sits behind stacks of papers in a gray tailored suit that complements the gray hairs that curl around his temples.
BOOKS
March 30, 2003 | Kate Manning, Kate Manning is the author of "Whitegirl," a novel about the marriage of a white woman and a black man.
Jungle fever. Nighttime integration. Mongrelization. Deviance. Rape. Depravity. These are some of the ways Americans in our history have described love and sex between African Americans and European Americans, harsh testimony to the fact that, until recently, intimacy across the color line was a transgression, and any discussion of it was hushed and shamed, sensationalized or fraught with danger, especially for black people.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1987
I am in agreement with the feeling of Alan Dershowitz, as seen in his article (Editorial Pages, May 19), "Let Even the Most Obnoxious and Offensive Ideas Be Heard," that no speaker, no matter what he or she represents, should be censored. Prof. Randall Kennedy has every right to be upset with apartheid, and should speak out against it. However, as Dershowitz points out, it is not right for him to advocate the disruption of certain speeches, even those given by racist representatives.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Hey, wanna buy a bookstore? Phoenix Books in San Francisco is for sale. Phoenix Books is a 1,500-square-foot storefront in San Francisco's Noe Valley. The San Francisco Chronicle writes that its "collection of used and new books is well organized, reasonably priced and eclectic, plus somewhat lopsided toward fiction and art books. " It also has a strong children's section. Sounds good. But ... does it come with the stock? That's up to negotiation, owner Kate Rosenberger says.
BOOKS
March 30, 2003 | Kate Manning, Kate Manning is the author of "Whitegirl," a novel about the marriage of a white woman and a black man.
Jungle fever. Nighttime integration. Mongrelization. Deviance. Rape. Depravity. These are some of the ways Americans in our history have described love and sex between African Americans and European Americans, harsh testimony to the fact that, until recently, intimacy across the color line was a transgression, and any discussion of it was hushed and shamed, sensationalized or fraught with danger, especially for black people.
BOOKS
February 3, 2002 | ISHMAEL REED
Six years ago, Robert S. Boynton in the Atlantic Monthly nominated a group of new black intellectuals whom he hailed for going beyond race to look at the "commonality of American concern." Yet if race were placed in the background of their work, none of the writers and thinkers he mentioned would be in business. Americans are fascinated with race, and so it is inevitable that merely placing the word "nigger" on the cover of a book guarantees controversy and book sales.
NEWS
January 11, 2002 | LAUREN SANDLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
'Deep in the streets" is not how anyone would describe Randall Kennedy. Each morning he commutes from his home in suburban Boston to Harvard Law School. His office there is a cacophony of casebooks and culture. Sarah Vaughan tapes and Philip Roth novels join the clutter that surrounds his large desk. He sits behind stacks of papers in a gray tailored suit that complements the gray hairs that curl around his temples.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1989
Randall L. Kennedy takes the Supreme Court to task over its recent decision in Patterson vs. McLean Credit Union, a workplace anti-discrimination case based on the Civil Rights Act of 1866 (Opinion, June 25). Incensed over his perception that the decision, while holding that the act prohibits an employer from refusing to hire someone on the basis of race, does not prohibit that employer from later subjecting the employee to discriminatory conditions, Kennedy suggests that the court is "still a white man's forum."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 2006 | Valerie Reitman, Times Staff Writer
Comic Paul Mooney used to joke in his routine that he uttered the "N-word" 100 times every morning. "Well, white folks, you shouldn't have ever made up the word," Mooney, who is black, says in promotional material. "... I say nigga 100 times every morning; it makes my teeth white."
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