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Randall Lavender

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1988 | WILLIAM WILSON
It was bound to happen. About 10 years ago I was trying to figure out what I could do that was completely unlike anything going on. I was looking for something, well, dangerous. Modern art had become so safe. You could get away with anything because there were no rules. Artists could always smirk and say they were just kidding. Irony acted as a kind of safety net. I wanted to do something without a net. Classicism attracted me because you either get it right or you don't.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1988 | WILLIAM WILSON
It was bound to happen. About 10 years ago I was trying to figure out what I could do that was completely unlike anything going on. I was looking for something, well, dangerous. Modern art had become so safe. You could get away with anything because there were no rules. Artists could always smirk and say they were just kidding. Irony acted as a kind of safety net. I wanted to do something without a net. Classicism attracted me because you either get it right or you don't.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1989 | SUVAN GEER
Jon Swihart is noted as an artist of ambiguous quasi-religious narratives in miniaturized magical detail. New work inspired by a six-month residency at Monet's estate at Giverny marks a radical departure from his usual ambiguous, quasi-religious narratives. These are small, Old World landscapes in jewel-clear colors. For a taste of another place, and a more romantically perfect world, Swihart gives us postcard-sized views of vast green fields skirting low hills under rolling clouds.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 1987 | WILLIAM WILSON
Oops, what a surprise! Randall Lavender's new work is like going to see your old hippie friend and finding him wearing a tux and brilliantined hair. It takes a minute to realize it's the same guy. Lavender is among the more promising artists trying to sort his art out of the mountains contending for attention these days.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1987 | CATHY CURTIS
What if this nasty old world could be remade into a clean, pure, noble place to gladden the heart and lift the spirit? "Contemporary Humanism: Reconfirmation of the Figure," at Cal State Fullerton's Main Art Gallery through Dec. 10, presents four California-based artists who use their figure-painting skills to put an '80s spin on the kind of story-telling, moral-pointing canvases that fill the great museums. But the work on view, guest curated by Olivia S.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 1994 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
A few days ago, in the pre-dawn dark, millions of Angelenos shared the terror of feeling they might not see the dawn. It was an experience designed--once panic subsided--to put survivors in thoughtful moods. What was it that so frightened us in the blackness and so comforted us in the light of the sun? First we were blinded, then we could see. We were suddenly grateful for mere appearance. Art, at its best, shows what is happening behind the simple look of things.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1994 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
People, it appears, respond to the waning of centuries the way they react to the twilight of individual existence. They grow reflective and uneasy, wondering if they have lived in the best way. Those who feel unfulfilled may begin to wish for some promise that assures them it's really not over when it's over. Signs of this mind-set are everywhere as this secular century winds down. There is a longing for something to believe in.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1987 | CATHY CURTIS
What if this nasty old world could be remade into a clean, pure, noble place to gladden the heart and lift the spirit? "Contemporary Humanism: Reconfirmation of the Figure," at Cal State Fullerton's Main Art Gallery through Dec. 10, presents four California-based artists who use their figure-painting skills to put an '80s spin on the kind of story-telling, moral-pointing canvases that fill the Old Masters galleries in the great museums. But the work on view, with Olivia S.
NEWS
October 17, 1985 | MARY LOU LOPER, Times Staff Writer
The President's Brunch will go forward Saturday in Town and Gown before the USC/Stanford football game in the Coliseum, but, alas, Dr. James H. Zumberge, USC's president, is recovering from surgery (he has a good prognosis and is recovering nicely), and will be absent. Ironically, the brunch focuses on health affairs. Dr. Joseph P.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1991 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
Successful artists rarely re-invent themselves. After all, why bother when one has repute and a standardized product that does well? Charles Arnoldi has been such an artist. For years he has beguiled collectors with wall reliefs made of crisscrossed branches or hewn from wood with a chain saw. He painted too and often not badly, but it was an art that pleased rather than challenged. For the past three years he's been closeted in his Venice studio.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 1991 | SHAUNA SNOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles arts community, segments of which have claimed a leadership role in the AIDS battle for years, will take a step toward further unity on the issue on Sunday with the celebration of the third annual "A Day Without Art," the art world's response to the World Health Organization's World AIDS Day. The annual Dec.
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