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Randi Mayem Singer

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 1993 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
We're losing Robin Williams. Never mind that his latest film, "Mrs. Doubtfire" (citywide), has the markings of a major commercial success, an achievement due exclusively to Williams' agreeing to take on a role born in high-concept heaven: A divorced dad disguises himself as a grandmotherly British housekeeper to spend more time with the children he loves. And, of course, when Williams wants to be funny, no one can hope to keep up.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1993 | JANE GALBRAITH
When screenwriter Randi Mayem Singer was just Randi Mayem she, like a lot of other brides-to-be, went through prenuptial terror. When Leonard Goldberg, an independent producer at 20th Century Fox, took his daughter to a bachelorette party recently, he was mystified by all of the last-minute craziness.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1994 | JUDY BRENNAN
First there was a live-action movie version of the popular cartoon TV series "The Flintstones." Now there's a live-action version of a Disney animated classic in the works--"Pinocchio." But the master pulling the strings on the latest version of the fairy tale about the puppet-turned-boy is not in the Disney camp. It's Francis Ford Coppola, the maestro of "The Godfather" trilogy, "Bram Stoker's Dracula" and the upcoming Nov. 4 release "Mary Shelley's Frankenstein."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1993 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If the bond between Israel and the U.S. entertainment community has been primarily fiscal, a proposed alliance between Hollywood and the 4-year-old Jerusalem National Film and Television school is a departure from this tradition. This spring, sponsors of the program hope to send two American screenwriters to help aspiring Israeli filmmakers hone their creative skills and achieve a more universal focus.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1992 | ANDY MARX
Asking Hollywood insiders what their favorite unproduced scripts are is a lot like asking chefs to name their favorite dish--it's hard to get a consensus. One thing is certain: Around town, there's a "list" --albeit an informal one--of favorite unproduced screenplays. Like stocks and municipal bonds, the fortunes of certain unproduced scripts seem to rise and fall depending on which way the wind is blowing.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2003 | Brian Lowry, Times Staff Writer
Television writers and actors are so accustomed to stretches of unemployment that the Screen Actors Guild's Internet site features an "unemployment handbook." Yet as that group and the Writers Guild of America presented their annual awards over the weekend, it's clear that anxiety levels have been elevated due to the shadow cast by so-called reality television.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1995 | Daniel Howard Cerone, Daniel Howard Cerone is a Times staff writer.
In CBS' new comedy "Can't Hurry Love," Nancy McKeon plays a young, single employment counselor looking for love in New York City. In NBC's new comedy "Caroline in the City," Leah Thompson plays a young, single cartoonist looking for love in New York City. In NBC's new comedy "The Single Guy," Jonathan Silverman plays--you guessed it--a young, single novelist looking for love in New York City.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1993 | BLAISE SIMPSON, Blaise Simpson is a free-lance writer based in San Francisco
Chris Columbus is the Rodney Dangerfield of directors. Despite having made "Home Alone" (now the fourth-highest-grossing movie ever) and its sequel, "Home Alone 2: Lost in New York," he just can't seem to get much respect. To start with, there's that name, which even he says is funny. "If it were Vittorio Colombo or something, people might not think twice about it," he reflects, "but you see 'Chris Columbus' up there and it just makes you smile."
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