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Randol Schoenberg

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2004 | Anne-Marie O'Connor, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles attorney Randol Schoenberg has invested an inordinate amount of his career on a case that, until now, many legal experts considered impossible to win. For six years, Schoenberg has represented Maria Altmann, an 88-year-old Cheviot Hills woman who is trying to reclaim six valuable Gustav Klimt paintings seized by the Nazis from her uncle in Vienna and now in the possession of the Austrian national museum. The legal saga has taken him from Vienna to the U.S.
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OPINION
March 17, 2012 | Patt Morrison
The riches and treasures of Europe vacuumed up by Hitler's Third Reich are still turning up, including some paintings Hitler bought for himself that were just found in a Czech monastery. But most of the Fuhrer's loot was just that: looted. Once in a while, it gets returned to its rightful owners. Los Angeles lawyer E. Randol Schoenberg joined forces with Maria Altmann in a legal battle to reclaim her family's collection of paintings, seized by the Nazis in 1938. The artworks, by Gustav Klimt, included a famous portrait of Altmann's aunt, Adele Bloch-Bauer, that was hanging in plain sight in an Austrian state museum.
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OPINION
March 17, 2012 | Patt Morrison
The riches and treasures of Europe vacuumed up by Hitler's Third Reich are still turning up, including some paintings Hitler bought for himself that were just found in a Czech monastery. But most of the Fuhrer's loot was just that: looted. Once in a while, it gets returned to its rightful owners. Los Angeles lawyer E. Randol Schoenberg joined forces with Maria Altmann in a legal battle to reclaim her family's collection of paintings, seized by the Nazis in 1938. The artworks, by Gustav Klimt, included a famous portrait of Altmann's aunt, Adele Bloch-Bauer, that was hanging in plain sight in an Austrian state museum.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2006 | Anne-Marie O'Connor, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles attorney Randol Schoenberg was just a boy when he first saw Vienna, the hometown of his grandfather Arnold, the composer. At the national art museum in baroque Belvedere Castle, his mother stood in a roomful of paintings by Gustav Klimt and pointed to the shimmering portrait of a sultry, enigmatic beauty suspended in gold. Schoenberg never forgot the portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer, which was seized by the Nazis in 1938 and delivered to the museum with the salutation "Heil Hitler."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2006 | Anne-Marie O'Connor, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles attorney Randol Schoenberg was just a boy when he first saw Vienna, the hometown of his grandfather Arnold, the composer. At the national art museum in baroque Belvedere Castle, his mother stood in a roomful of paintings by Gustav Klimt and pointed to the shimmering portrait of a sultry, enigmatic beauty suspended in gold. Schoenberg never forgot the portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer, which was seized by the Nazis in 1938 and delivered to the museum with the salutation "Heil Hitler."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2003 | Diane Haithman
A Los Angeles Superior Court judge has ruled that a legal battle over the ownership of a $10-million Picasso painting looted by the Nazis should be waged in Chicago, rather than Los Angeles, where the lawsuit in the case was filed.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2006
E. Randol Schoenberg, the attorney who engineered the return of five Nazi-looted Gustav Klimt paintings for Los Angeles resident Maria Altmann, will be honored by the Beverly Hills Bar Assn. on May 31. The event will be held at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and includes a viewing of the paintings and a screening of the documentary "Klimt: Adele's Last Will."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2003 | Scott Timberg
A judge has ruled that the case of a looted $10-million Picasso painting, taken by the Nazis in World War II, should move from California to Illinois jurisdiction. In December, UC Berkeley law student Thomas Bennigson sued in L.A. to regain control of "Woman in White" from its current owner, Chicago philanthropist Marilynn Alsdorf. According to Bennigson's attorney, E. Randol Schoenberg, the venue change is a stalling tactic: "It could add a year to the case." Schoenberg is appealing the ruling.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 2003 | Anne-Marie O'Connor
Austria has petitioned the U.S. Supreme Court to stay a federal appellate decision that would allow a Nazi art theft case to go forward in U.S. court. Maria Altmann of West Los Angeles is suing Austria to reclaim paintings by Gustav Klimt valued at $150 million and now owned by the Austrian National Museum. Altmann claims that the paintings, stolen by the Nazis, belonged to her uncle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1993
Apparently, Ruben Martinez finds it somehow symbolic that UCLA's Schoenberg Plaza has been appropriated and renamed "Plaza Aztlan" by Chicano activists ("The Emergence of L.A.'s True Identity," Commentary, June 9). The transformation is supposed to symbolize the reawakening of L.A.'s Mexican past. Schoenberg Plaza is not named after merely another "dead European composer," but after my grandfather, Arnold Schoenberg, a Jew born in Vienna who fled Nazi persecution in Europe in 1933 and spent the last 17 years of his life right here in Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2004 | Anne-Marie O'Connor, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles attorney Randol Schoenberg has invested an inordinate amount of his career on a case that, until now, many legal experts considered impossible to win. For six years, Schoenberg has represented Maria Altmann, an 88-year-old Cheviot Hills woman who is trying to reclaim six valuable Gustav Klimt paintings seized by the Nazis from her uncle in Vienna and now in the possession of the Austrian national museum. The legal saga has taken him from Vienna to the U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2013 | By David Ng
The Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust said on Monday that it has named Samara Hutman as its new executive director. Hutman -- who comes from Remember Us, a Holocaust education organization -- will report to museum President E. Randol Schoenberg. Hutman served as executive director of Remember Us since 2011. Remember Us works with middle and high schools to promote Holocaust awareness. She will officially begin her new job at the L.A. Museum of the Holocaust on Tuesday. CRITICS' PICKS: What to watch, where to go, what to eat At the museum, Hutman will take on the executive director role that Schoenberg had filled on a temporary basis.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2005 | Diane Haithman, Times Staff Writer
As the result of an out-of-court settlement, Bay Area resident Thomas Bennigson will receive $6.5 million from Marilynn Alsdorf of Chicago for a Pablo Picasso painting reportedly stolen by the Nazis from Bennigson's grandmother years before Alsdorf acquired it in 1975. Additionally, as part of a prior agreement contingent on the settlement, Bennigson will receive a lesser sum from Stephen Hahn -- the art dealer who sold the painting to Alsdorf and her late husband, James.
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