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February 28, 2001 | From Associated Press
Randolph Apperson Hearst, who inherited a newspaper that would later report the kidnapping of his daughter by terrorists, left almost all of his personal property to his wife, according to his will. Hearst died in New York on Dec. 18 at age 85 after suffering a stroke. His last will and testament estimates his personal property--for probate purposes--at $25 million.
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NEWS
February 28, 2001 | From Associated Press
Randolph Apperson Hearst, who inherited a newspaper that would later report the kidnapping of his daughter by terrorists, left almost all of his personal property to his wife, according to his will. Hearst died in New York on Dec. 18 at age 85 after suffering a stroke. His last will and testament estimates his personal property--for probate purposes--at $25 million.
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NEWS
January 1, 1999 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Catherine Campbell Hearst, a conservative member of the University of California Board of Regents for 20 years, including the riotous 1960s, has died at the age of 81. Hearst, who had moved to Beverly Hills after her divorce from Randolph A. Hearst, died Wednesday of a stroke at UCLA Medical Center. She became a nationally known figure after the Feb. 4, 1974, kidnapping of her daughter, Patricia Hearst, by the terrorist Symbionese Liberation Army.
NEWS
December 19, 2000 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Randolph Apperson Hearst, the last surviving son of the legendary newspaper magnate William Randolph Hearst and chairman of the family's media empire from 1973 to 1996, died Monday in a New York hospital. He was 85. Hearst also was editor and president of the San Francisco Examiner when his daughter Patricia was kidnapped by the radical Symbionese Liberation Army in 1974. During the long ordeal, a visibly shaken Hearst regularly faced television cameras and pleaded for his daughter's return.
NEWS
January 20, 1998 | FRANK CLIFFORD and LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Subject to a will that threatens rebellious heirs with disinheritance, descendants of William Randolph Hearst are just now daring to break a long silence over the management of their legendary holdings. The impetus for speaking out is the controversy over a proposed commercial development on the 77,000-acre Hearst ranch at San Simeon. The rare public disagreements have brought into view an underlying division between at least some members of the famous family and its hired managers.
BUSINESS
October 11, 1988 | Associated Press
Here is Forbes magazine's 1988 list of the 400 richest Americans in descending order of wealth, showing estimated fortune in millions, residence, source of wealth and age. Duplicated numbers represent ties; boldfaced entries are used to designate Californians. 1) Sam Moore Walton, $6,700, Bentonville, Ark., Wal-Mart Stores, 70. 2) John Werner Kluge, $3,200, Charlottesville, Va., Metromedia, 75. 3) Henry Ross Perot, $3,000 Dallas, Electronic Data Systems, 58.
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