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Randolph Bourne

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NEWS
July 5, 2001 | ALLAN JALON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"The Body of Bourne," a play at the Mark Taper Forum, is about a tragic essayist named Randolph Bourne. We all know about tragic poets. The muse sets them on fire, a horrible disease strikes them when they're young, they speak a beautiful last sentence and die. But a tragic essayist? The news of any essayist as hero would surprise no less a master than E.B. White, who said he suffered from a "second-class citizen" status compared with novelists, playwrights and poets.
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NEWS
July 5, 2001 | ALLAN JALON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"The Body of Bourne," a play at the Mark Taper Forum, is about a tragic essayist named Randolph Bourne. We all know about tragic poets. The muse sets them on fire, a horrible disease strikes them when they're young, they speak a beautiful last sentence and die. But a tragic essayist? The news of any essayist as hero would surprise no less a master than E.B. White, who said he suffered from a "second-class citizen" status compared with novelists, playwrights and poets.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2001 | BEN MATTLIN, Ben Mattlin is a freelance writer who lives in Los Angeles
As a father, husband, Harvard graduate and lifelong wheelchair-user due to a congenital neuromuscular weakness similar to muscular dystrophy, I read Michael Phillips review of the new play "The Body of Bourne" at the Mark Taper Forum ("Not Letting Others' Words Define Him," June 8) with much eagerness. But after seeing the play myself, I'm saddened and disturbed by how badly Phillips missed the point and, more seriously, misled countless potential theatergoers.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2001 | BEN MATTLIN, Ben Mattlin is a freelance writer who lives in Los Angeles
As a father, husband, Harvard graduate and lifelong wheelchair-user due to a congenital neuromuscular weakness similar to muscular dystrophy, I read Michael Phillips review of the new play "The Body of Bourne" at the Mark Taper Forum ("Not Letting Others' Words Define Him," June 8) with much eagerness. But after seeing the play myself, I'm saddened and disturbed by how badly Phillips missed the point and, more seriously, misled countless potential theatergoers.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2001 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
The true Puritan, said essayist and cultural critic Randolph Bourne (1886-1918), "loves virtue not so much for its own sake as for its being an instrument of terror." Bourne was no Puritan, though a lesser spirit in his circumstances might have become one. The writer endured what was termed a "messy" birth and grew up stunted, disfigured, often mercilessly taunted.
NEWS
November 26, 1992
Santa Monica Acting City Atty. Joseph Lawrence keeps writing wonderful, compassionate justifications for his office's continuing refusal to enforce the city's anti-encampment law concerning the homeless (Times, Nov. 1). Lawrence's words remind me of those of an eloquent early 20th-Century liberal essayist, Randolph Bourne. In a 1917 essay, Bourne stated, "The true Puritan is at once the most unselfish and the most self-righteous of men. To the true Puritan the beauty of unselfishness lies in his being able to enforce it on others.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2001
* The traveling survey "Winslow Homer and the Critics: Forging a National Art in the 1870s," runs June 10-Sept. 9 at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 5905 Wilshire Blvd., L.A. $5-$15. (323) 857-6000. * "The Body of Bourne," the world premiere of John Belluso's play about influential intellectual Randolph Bourne, plays June 7-July 15 at the Mark Taper Forum, 135 N. Grand Ave., downtown L.A. $30-$44. (213) 628-2772.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2001
Brutally driven covert operative John Travolta, above, and his assistant, Halle Berry, lure computer hacker Hugh Jackman into a scheme to steal $9 billion in "Swordfish," the latest explosive thriller from producer Joel Silver. Don Cheadle, Vinnie Jones and Sam Shepard co-star in the film directed by Dominic Sena and opening Friday. Also: A young cartographer fulfills his grandfather's dream of finding "Atlantis: The Lost Empire." The animated adventure, with the voices of Michael J.
OPINION
June 25, 2008
Re "War claims its 500th Californian" and "Boy, 16, fatally shot at bus stop," June 21 I read with deep compassion The Times' account of Joy and Steve Retmier's loss of their son, Marc, in Afghanistan. My thoughts and prayers go out to them and all the other families that have suffered this ultimate loss. I could not help but also notice the story of a 16-year-old boy killed in a drive-by shooting in Hyde Park. This teenager must be about the 1,500th gang-related murder in Los Angeles since the start of the Afghanistan war. Whenever we read a tragic personal story, we also need a broader perspective that allows us to understand the challenges we face in our everyday lives.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2001
Former Bill Monroe sideman Del McCoury went on to form the group that dominated bluegrass in the '90s, and now the eclectic, award-winning, family-close (it also includes two of the leader's sons) Del McCoury Band warms up for the new decade with a new album, "Del & the Boys." Two Southland shows set the stage for the July release.* The Del McCoury Band, with Mercy Miles and Hired Guns, at the Coach House, 33157 Camino Capistrano, San Juan Capistrano. 8 p.m. $17.50. (949) 496-8927.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2001 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
The true Puritan, said essayist and cultural critic Randolph Bourne (1886-1918), "loves virtue not so much for its own sake as for its being an instrument of terror." Bourne was no Puritan, though a lesser spirit in his circumstances might have become one. The writer endured what was termed a "messy" birth and grew up stunted, disfigured, often mercilessly taunted.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2000 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
The Mark Taper Forum has announced a 2000-01 season that will feature a wide range of contemporary work. August Wilson's latest play, "King Hedley II" (Sept. 14-Oct. 22), will follow in the wake of his first play, "Jitney," which closed at the Taper last weekend. Part of Wilson's series of plays set in different decades, "King Hedley II" is set in 1985 in the same Pittsburgh neighborhood where "Jitney" took place.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2001
10 am Art The California State Parks will present "Images of Crystal Cove," an exhibit of original art work created by members of the Laguna Plein Air Painters Assn. The artists will compete in a "paint-off" at the Historic District within Crystal Cove State Park for a total of $10,000 in prizes from Joan Irvine Smith Fine Arts. The public is invited to meet the artists and watch them paint.
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