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Randolph Scott

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NEWS
March 2, 1987
Randolph Scott, the tall handsome cowboy in countless Hollywood Westerns, whose square-jawed countenance and poker-faced stare became the prototype for a generation of more modern Western heroes, died today at his Bel-Air home. He was 89. The actor's son-in-law, Sam Tyler, said Scott died at 6 a.m. in his sleep. He had been in ill health in recent years, suffering from a weak heart, and had several bouts with pneumonia.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Elegant and economical - with plot, action and character precisely balanced and pared down to iconic essentials - the legendary westerns directed by Budd Boetticher, produced by Harry Joe Brown and starring Randolph Scott are as good as their reputation. Which is saying a lot. If you love westerns, or wonder why others do, these five films speak loud and clear. Known collectively as the Ranown cycle (a mash-up of Randolph and Brown's names), these films are the heart, and the soul, of the splendid UCLA Film & Television Archive series "Ride Lonesome: The Films of Budd Boetticher," which opens Friday at the Hammer Museum's Billy Wilder Theater in Westwood.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1987 | PENELOPE McMILLAN, Times Staff Writer
Randolph Scott, the tall, handsome cowboy of countless Hollywood Westerns, an actor whose square-jawed countenance and poker-faced stare became prototypes for the generation of Western heroes who followed him, died Monday at his Bel-Air home. He was 89. One of the top box-office stars of the late 1940s and early '50s (and in the top 10 from 1950 to 1953), Scott had retired in 1963 after a 32-year career that produced 96 movies.
REAL ESTATE
April 30, 2006 | Ruth Ryon, Times Staff Writer
After signing a five-year contract with Paramount in 1932, English actor Archie Leach became Cary Grant. That year, the 28-year-old, destined to become one of the most celebrated movie stars of Hollywood's golden age, met actor Randolph Scott on the set of Paramount's "Hot Saturday," and the two moved into a house near Griffith Park.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Elegant and economical - with plot, action and character precisely balanced and pared down to iconic essentials - the legendary westerns directed by Budd Boetticher, produced by Harry Joe Brown and starring Randolph Scott are as good as their reputation. Which is saying a lot. If you love westerns, or wonder why others do, these five films speak loud and clear. Known collectively as the Ranown cycle (a mash-up of Randolph and Brown's names), these films are the heart, and the soul, of the splendid UCLA Film & Television Archive series "Ride Lonesome: The Films of Budd Boetticher," which opens Friday at the Hammer Museum's Billy Wilder Theater in Westwood.
NEWS
April 30, 1989
Your article, "Shadows on a Legend" (by Garry Abrams, March 24), gives undeserved publicity and recognition to two authors whose journalistic credibility has been questioned on several previous occasions. Their book is composed of false allegations, rumors and contorted interviews. Simple facts such as how my grandfather died are incorrect as are the insulting charges about my father, Randolph Scott. At least twice, the authors used anonymous sources casting doubt over the specific allegations as well as the integrity of the total book.
NEWS
October 16, 2000 | GENE SEYMOUR, NEWSDAY
"Do you think," I asked a colleague the other day, "that my 10-year-old son would appreciate being taken along to see 'Seven Men From Now'?" "Depends on whether you raised him right," was the reply coming from a wry, dry corner of the colleague's mouth. Which is the sort of answer I deserved--probably the sort of answer that I would have gotten from Randolph Scott himself. Released in 1956, "Seven Men From Now" was the first of seven "B" westerns directed by Budd Boetticher and starring Scott (1903-87)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2000 | GENE SEYMOUR, NEWSDAY
"Do you think," I asked a colleague the other day, "that my 10-year-old son would appreciate being taken along to see 'Seven Men From Now'?" "Depends on whether you raised him right," was the reply coming from a wry, dry corner of the colleague's mouth. Which is the sort of answer I deserved--probably the sort of answer that I would have gotten from Randolph Scott himself.
SPORTS
October 13, 1985 | Shav Glick
For the first time in recent golf history, two U.S. Amateur champions will compete in the same collegiate tournament when Sam Randolph of USC and Scott Verplank of Oklahoma State tee up Monday in the eighth annual Southwestern Intercollegiate meet at the North Ranch Country Club in Westlake Village. Verplank, who also made a historical impact on the game when he won the Western Open as an amateur last summer, defeated Randolph, 4 and 3, in the 1984 U.S.
NEWS
October 16, 2000 | GENE SEYMOUR, NEWSDAY
"Do you think," I asked a colleague the other day, "that my 10-year-old son would appreciate being taken along to see 'Seven Men From Now'?" "Depends on whether you raised him right," was the reply coming from a wry, dry corner of the colleague's mouth. Which is the sort of answer I deserved--probably the sort of answer that I would have gotten from Randolph Scott himself. Released in 1956, "Seven Men From Now" was the first of seven "B" westerns directed by Budd Boetticher and starring Scott (1903-87)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2000 | GENE SEYMOUR, NEWSDAY
"Do you think," I asked a colleague the other day, "that my 10-year-old son would appreciate being taken along to see 'Seven Men From Now'?" "Depends on whether you raised him right," was the reply coming from a wry, dry corner of the colleague's mouth. Which is the sort of answer I deserved--probably the sort of answer that I would have gotten from Randolph Scott himself.
NEWS
April 30, 1989
Re "Shadows on a Legend," I feel the record must be set straight (regarding) the gossipmonger's false story about Randolph Scott, whom we have known since 1936. Mr. Scott was the finest gentleman in every way, best husband and father, too. We enjoyed his friendship through his 43 years of happy marriage, therefore, positively state that Charles Higham's story is a fantasy. MRS. DENNIS O'KEEFE Beverly Hills
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1987 | PENELOPE McMILLAN, Times Staff Writer
Randolph Scott, the tall, handsome cowboy of countless Hollywood Westerns, an actor whose square-jawed countenance and poker-faced stare became prototypes for the generation of Western heroes who followed him, died Monday at his Bel-Air home. He was 89. One of the top box-office stars of the late 1940s and early '50s (and in the top 10 from 1950 to 1953), Scott had retired in 1963 after a 32-year career that produced 96 movies.
NEWS
March 2, 1987
Randolph Scott, the tall handsome cowboy in countless Hollywood Westerns, whose square-jawed countenance and poker-faced stare became the prototype for a generation of more modern Western heroes, died today at his Bel-Air home. He was 89. The actor's son-in-law, Sam Tyler, said Scott died at 6 a.m. in his sleep. He had been in ill health in recent years, suffering from a weak heart, and had several bouts with pneumonia.
REAL ESTATE
April 30, 2006 | Ruth Ryon, Times Staff Writer
After signing a five-year contract with Paramount in 1932, English actor Archie Leach became Cary Grant. That year, the 28-year-old, destined to become one of the most celebrated movie stars of Hollywood's golden age, met actor Randolph Scott on the set of Paramount's "Hot Saturday," and the two moved into a house near Griffith Park.
SPORTS
October 13, 1985 | Shav Glick
For the first time in recent golf history, two U.S. Amateur champions will compete in the same collegiate tournament when Sam Randolph of USC and Scott Verplank of Oklahoma State tee up Monday in the eighth annual Southwestern Intercollegiate meet at the North Ranch Country Club in Westlake Village. Verplank, who also made a historical impact on the game when he won the Western Open as an amateur last summer, defeated Randolph, 4 and 3, in the 1984 U.S.
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