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Random Acts Of Kindness Foundation

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1997 | KIMBERLY BROWER
Whether it's a thank-you card to a favorite teacher, a smile for a stranger or a poem to cheer up a friend, some South County youngsters are doing good deeds to celebrate Random Acts of Kindness Week, which continues through Sunday. At Santiago Elementary School in Lake Forest, students painted posters that parents helped them post across town. Classes have planned activities that include adopting charitable organizations, passing out kindness cards and sending notes to senior citizens.
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NEWS
December 25, 2001 | From Associated Press
Molly Stuart's Christmas wish list is longer than most, even though it lacks the usual electronic gadgets, jewelry or other gifts. Stuart is president of the Random Acts of Kindness Foundation, and her goal is to make kindness habit-forming. "We're a clearinghouse for kindness. We are grass-roots, and don't initiate projects. We provide support materials, all free," she said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 2000 | STEVE CHAWKINS
She sat alone in the midafternoon torpor of an all-but-empty Ventura cafe. An older woman, she was reading a romance novel over a cup of coffee. Nothing about her looked particularly needy, but an air of melancholy hung over her table, and you never know when someone can use a little bucking up. So I did what anyone who has read the current agenda of the Port Hueneme City Council would have done. I hailed the waitress and said, "I want to buy a tapioca pudding for that lady in the booth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 2006 | Glenn F. Bunting, Times Staff Writer
On a warm summer evening in 2004, Philip Anschutz greeted British Deputy Prime Minister John Prescott at the $150-million soccer palace Anschutz had created in Carson. After settling into a luxury suite to watch the Los Angeles Galaxy battle the San Jose Earthquakes, Prescott asked Anschutz which side he was rooting for. "He said it didn't matter because he owned the two teams," Prescott recalled in an interview in London.
NATIONAL
July 22, 2002 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The money in the white envelopes bought one cancer patient a beautiful ham. It bought nine disabled children an afternoon of golf and giggles. True, some money may have been squandered on an addict's high. But it did buy an exhausted mother a massage. In $50 increments, the money in the white envelopes spread hope. And it left some folks thinking they could make a difference in the world.
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