Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRandom House Inc
IN THE NEWS

Random House Inc

ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2006 | From Reuters
Random House Inc. has acquired the evangelical Christian book-publishing house Multnomah Publishers, a move that reaffirms the growing mainstream popularity of religious books. "There is an enormous market and it is a growth market," Random House spokesman Stuart Applebaum said. "We believe that it is a timeless interest." Oregon-based Multnomah is Random House's second Christian imprint. The first, WaterBrook Press, was created in 1996.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 18, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Publishing giant Random House is planning a tenfold increase in the amount of recycled paper it uses in books printed in the United States. The company announced Tuesday that by 2010, about 30% of the uncoated paper used in most of its U.S. titles will be made from recycled fibers, up from less than 3% now. Random House Inc. called the change "the most substantial environmental initiative in the company's history" and said it would save the equivalent of 550,000 trees per year.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2005 | From Associated Press
Sean "P. Diddy" Combs and Random House, Inc., have settled a lawsuit in which the publisher alleged that the hip-hop mogul never paid back a $300,000 advance for a memoir he never completed. "The matter has been amicably resolved," according to a statement issued Tuesday by Random House. Citing a confidentiality agreement, Random House spokesman Stuart Applebaum would not say whether Combs had returned the money, but did say that the publisher would not be releasing a book by him.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2003 | From Associated Press
A Random House executive forced out of her job for not generating enough profits has joined a leading rival, the Penguin Group. Ann Godoff, who published such bestsellers at Random House as Caleb Carr's "The Alienist" and Zadie Smith's "White Teeth," will become president and publisher of her own imprint at Penguin.
BUSINESS
December 5, 2002 | From Associated Press
Random House Inc. has settled a lawsuit against an e-book publisher that was selling digital versions of Kurt Vonnegut's "Cat's Cradle" and seven other popular titles. RosettaBooks will continue publishing the works, which predate the rise of the Web, and will collaborate with Random House on additional books. But the settlement leaves unresolved the issue of whether authors or publishers control rights to e-books when the contract has no specific language about the electronic format.
BUSINESS
July 12, 2001 | DAVID STREITFELD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A traditional book publishing contract does not automatically cover the rights to issue the work electronically, a federal judge ruled Wednesday. In denying a request from Random House for a preliminary injunction against upstart electronic publisher RosettaBooks, U.S. District Judge Sidney Stein in New York delivered a major setback to established publishers and a modest victory to writers.
NEWS
January 19, 2001 | LYNELL GEORGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One historical marker often gets bandied about in the black-book trade: "Pre" and "Post-T.M." "T.M.," of course, for those who somehow escaped the great exhale of 1992, stands for Terry McMillan, the mega-bestselling author who proved that not only that a black reading market does exist, but that it is also long-starved and can be fiercely loyal.
BUSINESS
November 8, 2000 | Associated Press
Publishing heavyweight Random House Inc. announced it will split revenue from electronic books evenly with authors, a change that could shape a heated industry debate over digital technology. Random House, the largest English-language publisher, said it will pay authors 50% of the revenue it generates from the sale of e-books, a minuscule market but one that is expected to boom. Authors currently earn 15% of an e-book's list price.
BUSINESS
August 1, 2000 | Reuters
Random House Inc., the biggest English-language book publisher, said it has launched a unit for electronic books, called AtRandom. New York-based Random House, part of Germany's Bertelsmann media powerhouse, said it had set up a 20-book list of original electronic fiction and nonfiction. The books will be sold online as digital books or in single copies printed on demand and available at bookstores and online retailers. The titles will be published starting early next year.
NEWS
May 31, 2000 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Theodore Taylor calls it a case of David versus Goliath, with the 78-year-old Laguna Beach author casting himself as the underdog against publishing giant Random House. Taylor said he waged the extraordinary battle with the only weapon he had--words. At issue: new cover art for "The Cay," Taylor's award-winning young adult novel that has sold more than 4 million copies since it was first published by Doubleday 31 years ago.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|