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Random House Inc

NEWS
May 27, 1998 | MARK EHRMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Norman Mailer slipped into town Wednesday night without fanfare. The 75-year-old master of American prose appeared at the Writers Guild Theater in Beverly Hills as one speaker in the nonprofit Writers Bloc author / lecture series. According to guild President Andrea Grossman, the program "is dedicated to bringing great writers to Los Angeles. We were thrilled to get him."
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BUSINESS
April 24, 1998 | Reuters
Two influential publishing groups said they will seek to block Bertelsmann's planned purchase of New York-based Random House Inc., saying the German company would control 36% of the U.S. adult book market. The Authors Guild, which represents 7,200 published authors, and the Assn. of Authors' Representatives, an organization of literary and dramatic agents, said they were filing a formal objection with the Federal Trade Commission.
NEWS
April 9, 1998 | PAUL D. COLFORD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Carol Felsenthal distinguished herself as a digger not easily intimidated by a mighty subject when she wrote "Power, Privilege and the Post," a biography of Washington Post owner Katharine Graham. Published by G.P. Putnam's Sons in 1993, over the expressed concerns of Graham's attorney, the 500-page book still managed to earn the respect of the Post's appointed reviewer. Ronald Steel said the book was "unlikely to please its subject" but that it painted "a persuasive portrait of a gutsy woman."
BUSINESS
March 24, 1998 | From Bloomberg News
German media company Bertelsmann said it will buy the U.S. publisher Random House Inc. to become the world's largest publisher of English-language general books in a transaction estimated to be worth at least $1.1 billion. Bertelsmann, which owns U.S. publisher Bantam Doubleday Dell, bought the company from Advance Publications Inc., controlled by the Newhouse family. The purchase will give Bertelsmann English-language sales of $1.1 billion to $1.
BUSINESS
November 26, 1997 | Washington Post
After seven years as the most high-profile book publisher in the country, Harold Evans announced he is stepping down from his post at Random House to be editorial director of Mortimer Zuckerman's media properties. Zuckerman, a real estate developer, owns the New York Daily News, U.S. News & World Report, Atlantic Monthly and Fast Co. Random House has named Ann Godoff, who had risen to become No. 2 to Evans, to assume Evans' post. Random House is one of the flagship imprints of Random House Inc.
BUSINESS
August 16, 1997 | James Bates
Random House said that the much-anticipated book from Walt Disney Co. Chief Executive Michael Eisner won't be released this fall as originally planned, but at a later, unspecified date. Despite the delay, Random House Chief Executive Harold Evans insisted that "the writing of the book is on track, and so far it fulfills all of our expectations."
NEWS
December 30, 1996 | ELEANOR RANDOLPH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this city's contentious world of letters, they are known simply as Tina and Harry. Or "Teenanarry," which is how their names sound when they are whispered in awe or horror by the city's literati. Tina Brown, 43, has been editor of one of the nation's most revered magazines, the New Yorker, since 1992. Her husband, Harry Evans, 68, has been running one of the country's largest publishing houses, Random House, since 1990. Separately, each would command Manhattan's attention.
NEWS
August 15, 1996 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A campaign book published under the name of President Clinton will be released next week outlining Clinton's vision of a hoped-for second term and the nation's future. Random House Inc. will print a very large initial run of 400,000 copies of the 192-page hardcover volume, titled "Between Hope and History: Meeting America's Challenges for the 21st Century."
NEWS
February 14, 1996 | From Associated Press
The court fight over Joan Collins' two steamy novels ended in a split decision Tuesday. A jury found she had finished one book for publisher Random House but failed to deliver the second. The ruling means the former "Dynasty" star should receive more money from the two-book, $4-million deal she signed in 1990. Random House had rejected two of her manuscripts and sued for return of a $1.3-million advance. Collins countersued for the rest of the $4 million.
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