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NEWS
August 6, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
A random bullet tore through the wall of a Harlem apartment early today, hitting a 5-month-old baby in the forehead as he slept with his grandmother in the fifth such incident in three weeks, police said. The baby, identified by a relative as Pierre Romeline, was taken to St. Luke's Hospital after the 12:35 a.m. shooting and doctors removed the bullet in a delicate operation, said police spokesman Scott Bloch.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2013 | By Robin Abcarian
The proliferation of cameras at the 117th annual Boston Marathon, one of the country's most beloved and longstanding outdoor sporting events, ensured that whether or not we want to see what happened, we will be unable to avoid images of the two explosions and their aftermath . Like an image burned onto a computer screen, those pictures will sear our retinas, then fade in time. But they will never completely go away. And we will be forced to make sense of what has happened.
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NEWS
December 9, 1993 | FRANCES HALPERN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The outrageous killings in the Oxnard unemployment office are a gut-wrenching reminder that random violence in public places is escalating. Local author Eugene Wheeler, health planner and consultant to area and foreign governments, and psychologist S. Anthony Baron, nationally known for research on workplace violence, define the problem in their just-published book "Violence in Our Schools, Hospitals & Public Places."
WORLD
January 13, 2011 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
A pair of seemingly senseless killings this week in New Delhi has highlighted the dark side of India's fast-growing economy: rising frustration, urban alienation and a coveting of the wealth many feel is passing them by. On Tuesday, in an apparent case of road rage, a restaurant manager died when an airline pilot allegedly ran over him after their vehicles grazed each other at the city's posh Khan Market. This followed an incident late Monday in which four men killed a 17-year-old boy in northeast New Delhi after he declined to give them a screwdriver, which he reportedly didn't have.
WORLD
April 18, 2010 | By Robyn Dixon
Abdul Wuraola knelt in the dust, pleading for mercy. He'd offended the men with guns. They screamed at him in fury. Nothing he said appeased them. It took one downward thrust of a rifle butt into his skull to fell him. The gunmen weren't criminals. They were the police. His crime: He'd parked carelessly on the roadside in the northern Nigerian city of Kaduna to buy oranges for his breakfast. Police and security forces in Nigeria routinely engage in random violence that results in hundreds of killings annually, according to human rights groups.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1992 | LOUIS SAHAGUN and KENNETH J. GARCIA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Before the riots or after, life hasn't changed much for some Los Angeles homicide detectives. Another round of random gunshots, another innocent victim. On Thursday, 9-year-old Ramon Sanchez died after he was struck in the head by a stray bullet fired near his parents' home in Watts. Police don't know who fired the shots or why. They only have a few grim details and a lot of questions.
NEWS
August 23, 1992 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kimberly M. Horton, 21, died because someone wanted her car. Horton, a UCLA student with an ear for foreign languages and a dream of international travel, was shot last month, pulled from her 1991 Honda Accord and left to die on an Inglewood street while the gunman drove off with her car.
NEWS
December 1, 1985 | ERIC BAILEY, Times Staff Writer
Jose (Dreamer) Gonzales was trapped on enemy turf. The Halloween night brawl between two rival Long Beach street gangs had run its brutal course, but Gonzales was stranded when his friends piled into their beat-up cars and screeched away. Frantically trying to escape, Gonzales scampered down an alley. It was a mistake; half a dozen toughs from the rival gang cornered the 20-year-old. They swarmed over him, landing blows with fists, two-by-fours and a shovel.
NEWS
March 24, 1989
Washington Mayor Marion Barry tried to restore the tarnished image of the nation's capital, saying that most victims of the city's record number of killings are drug abusers and the town is safe for tourists. His remarks came at the beginning of the lucrative spring and summer tourist season--just before the arrival of about a million people to view the city's famed cherry blossoms. Barry said the problem is not random violence that threatens visitors.
OPINION
December 12, 1993 | JOHN H. GAGNON, John H. Gagnon is a professor of sociology at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. His commentary is from Newsday.
This news story has now become routine: A man with a rapid-firing handgun or assault rifle kills and maims a group of people just going about their everyday business. The number of dead and wounded varies; sometimes only a couple, sometimes two score or more are casualties. One time it is a group of exercisers in a health club, another time folks working in an employment office, still another commuters on their way home on a train.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 2010 | Steve Lopez
The Iraqi boy, who should have been dead according to his doctor, didn't look too bad, considering. He was smiling as he lay in his bed at Childrens Hospital Los Angeles, on the mend nine months after having his skull blown open by an improvised explosive device in Baghdad. Hashim Zareef, 10, doesn't like to think about that day in January. When his mother, Zahiraa, started telling me the story, he stuck his finger in his ear and turned onto his side. "We were going to see my father-in-law to have dinner together," the boy's mother said through an interpreter.
WORLD
April 18, 2010 | By Robyn Dixon
Abdul Wuraola knelt in the dust, pleading for mercy. He'd offended the men with guns. They screamed at him in fury. Nothing he said appeased them. It took one downward thrust of a rifle butt into his skull to fell him. The gunmen weren't criminals. They were the police. His crime: He'd parked carelessly on the roadside in the northern Nigerian city of Kaduna to buy oranges for his breakfast. Police and security forces in Nigeria routinely engage in random violence that results in hundreds of killings annually, according to human rights groups.
HEALTH
November 23, 2009 | By Francis V. Adams
I expected to see more gunshot wounds when I became a police surgeon for the NYPD three years ago. I had seen my first one as an intern decades earlier -- a suspect injured during a robbery had been brought into the emergency room -- and I still recalled the jagged, deep crater left by the bullet. The image had left its mark on me, not only by its appearance but also because it had been inflicted by another human being. I was braced for the sight of other such disturbing wounds, but I was surprised to find that many injuries resulted from trips, stumbles and mishaps that occurred off duty.
WORLD
October 5, 2008 | Tina Susman, Times Staff Writer
Naqi Shakir sits on a sagging mattress pushed against a wall. His wife and two daughters perch on tattered sofas and chairs crowded into the one room of the house with signs of family life: personal photographs tacked to the wall, a TV, books, and knickknacks on dusty shelves. Except for a folding table and chairs in the kitchen, nearly everything has been sold so the family can bolt as soon as someone rents the two-story home in a relatively safe Baghdad neighborhood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2008 | Jill Leovy, Times Staff Writer
Late Saturday night, a passerby noticed Troy Green's body lying on the sidewalk at the intersection of Parmelee Avenue and 75th Street in Florence. The 23-year-old had been shot, and had died alone, on the pavement. A few hours later, in St. Petersburg, Fla., a police officer went to the home of Green's sister Lillian. The officer got out only two words -- "your brother" -- and she broke down and cried. She didn't need to hear more, because for three long years Lillian Green had been expecting news of this sort about her troubled younger brother.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2008 | Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Times Staff Writer
The day he died, Christopher O'Leary, 34, awoke as usual, prepared to save lives. It is difficult to find meaning in death, particularly when the victim is young and responsible, as O'Leary was, cut down in the middle of the day at the height of a selfless career. Since his death, O'Leary's loved ones and colleagues have been retracing his final hours, compelled to look for an explanation, a pattern.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1990
"Two Killed as Gangs Turn Party Into Battleground" (Part B, Sept. 10) is an unusual headline only in that it understates the carnage, with four other citizens also slain by random shootings by gangs that weekend relegated to short paragraphs at the end of the article. Have we become that inured to murder on our streets? Are we that indifferent to having our citizens executed on the streets merely because they are on the street? Where are those bleeding hearts who oppose capital punishment for those who inflict it on the innocent?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1993
The past 2 1/2 years have presented a very sorry spectacle of this country to the world. Los Angeles has played a starring role, with bit parts for other areas of Southern California. I am referring to events that began with the arrest and beating of Rodney King, the riots of April, 1992, leading to the latest unflattering episode of the trial and almost total acquittal of Damian Williams and Henry Watson for one of the most vicious and violent series of attacks on other human beings at Florence and Normandie.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2006 | Reed Johnson, Times Staff Writer
LAST month, the mutilated bodies of two policemen were found in the streets of Acapulco. To make a grim story even more gruesome, the cops' severed heads were discovered some distance away in the Pacific resort city once fabled for its glamorous Hollywood visitors but now better known for toxic beaches and a vicious turf war between rival drug cartels. A sign accompanying the remains read: "So that you learn to respect."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2003 | Jill Leovy, Times Staff Writer
In the moments before he was shot, 13-year-old Joseph Arthur Swift "was so scared," his mother said a day after he became one of two boys to die within moments of each other on Los Angeles streets. Swift was in a crowd of young people leaving church when shots were fired from both sides of a passing car. His mother, Lorri Arbuckle, arrived just in time to hear him speak for the last time.
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