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Randy Adams

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb
In a surprise move Tuesday, former Bell Police Chief Randy Adams told a Los Angeles County Superior Court judge that he plans to testify in the corruption case against the city's second-in-command, Angela Spaccia. "I will testify," said Adams, who in one brief appearance on the witness stand had invoked the 5th Amendment against self-incrimination 20 times. Adams is expected to take the stand at 9:30 a.m. Wednesday.  DOCUMENT: Deposition of Randy Adams He may help fill in some of the blanks in the scandal that rocked the small city in southeastern Los Angeles County and forced him from his job. Although he was named in a state attorney general's lawsuit against eight Bell officials, he has not been charged with a crime.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2014 | By Corina Knoll and Kate Mather
The former second-in-command in the scandal-plagued city of Bell became the first person sentenced in the city's massive public corruption case Thursday, ordered to spend 11 years and eight months in prison for misappropriating public funds from one of Los Angeles County's poorest cities. Angela Spaccia, who has been jailed since she was convicted in December on 11 corruption-related charges, has consistently denied any wrongdoing, pinning the blame on the city's strong-willed chief executive and arguing that she wasn't even at City Hall when much of the wrongdoing took place.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb and Ruben Vives
When the city of Bell approached Randy Adams to be its police chief, he doubted the small, working-class town could afford him. Adams, who had recently retired as Glendale's police chief, wanted a salary in excess of $400,000. The city agreed. "I was surprised that a little city like this could afford to hire me," Adams, 62, testified Wednesday in the corruption trial of Angela Spaccia, the former city official who hired him in 2009. In taking the stand, Adams spoke publicly for the first time about the Bell scandal, providing fresh details about the inner workings of City Hall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb
Using a slide presentation that began with a stack of $100 bills atop the city seal, the prosecutor Wednesday said that the widespread corruption in Bell was the work of the city's top administrators - Robert Rizzo and Angela Spaccia. "There wasn't a mastermind in this case," Deputy Dist. Atty. Max Huntsman said. "There was a master and a mind. Mr. Rizzo was in charge. He was the boss, he had the power… but Ms. Spaccia made what he wanted to happen, happen. " After a month of testimony, but no appearance by Rizzo, who quietly pleaded no contest to 69 felonies last month, Spaccia's trial began winding down as the prosecution began its closing argument in a case that is rooted in the 2010 Bell corruption scandal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2012 | By Jeff Gottlieb, Los Angeles Times
A judge has rejected an effort by Bell's former police chief to more than double his pension to $510,000 a year, saying that the City Council never approved his extravagant contract and that city officials tried to keep his salary secret. Randy Adams, who was fired as the city was engulfed in scandal, would have become one of the highest paid public pensioners in California had his request been approved. The cost of doubling Adams' pension would have fallen primarily on Ventura, Simi Valley and Glendale, where he spent most of his career.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2011 | By Jeff Gottlieb, Los Angeles Times
From the day authorities handcuffed and led away eight Bell administrators and politicians in a massive public corruption case, people in this small working-class town have wondered why it wasn't the Bell 9 instead. Missing in the line-up of defendants — from city administrator Robert Rizzo to the pastor who said his lavish paycheck for serving on the City Council was a gift from God — was the town's police chief. For running the city's 46-person Police Department, Randy Adams made more than the Los Angeles police chief or the Los Angeles County sheriff.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 2012 | By Jeff Gottlieb, Los Angeles Times
The police chief who was ousted after it was revealed that he and other city leaders in Bell were drawing enormous salaries has sued his former employers for severance pay. Randy Adams, who is now one of the highest-paid public pensioners in California, stopped working for the small, working-class city shortly after The Times revealed the high salaries paid to the former chief, as well as to Chief Administrative Officer Robert Rizzo and Angela Spaccia,...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb and Ruben Vives
The chain of emails that has come to symbolize the greed of Bell's top leaders was actually a joke, the city's former second-in-command testified Wednesday in her trial on felony corruption charges. The emails became infamous in the wake of the salary scandal in Bell that led to the arrests of eight city leaders, including Angela Spaccia, who has been on the witness stand in her own defense since last week. Even Harland Braun, Spaccia's attorney, referred to them Wednesday as "the emails that have become so famous.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 2012 | By Jeff Gottlieb, Los Angeles Times
Already one of California's highest paid public pensioners, former Bell Police Chief Randy Adams this week asked a state pension panel to double his retirement pay to reflect the huge salary he received during his brief stint as the top cop in the scandal-plagued city. If Adams wins his case, which is being heard in Orange County, his pension would zoom to $510,000 a year, making him the second-highest-paid public pensioner in California. On the witness stand Thursday, Adams invoked his 5th Amendment right to not incriminate himself 20 times, including when asked about his Bell salary, which was among the highest law enforcement paychecks in the nation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb
He walked into the courtroom Tuesday, dressed in a dark blue suit, and sat in the front row. Everyone was certain this would be another perfunctory appearance by former Bell Police Chief Randy Adams, who in one brief appearance on the witness stand had invoked the 5th Amendment against self-incrimination 20 times. But when Adams stood up and Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Kathleen Kennedy asked what he planned to do, the former lawman surprised everyone in the courtroom.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb and Ruben Vives
The chain of emails that has come to symbolize the greed of Bell's top leaders was actually a joke, the city's former second-in-command testified Wednesday in her trial on felony corruption charges. The emails became infamous in the wake of the salary scandal in Bell that led to the arrests of eight city leaders, including Angela Spaccia, who has been on the witness stand in her own defense since last week. Even Harland Braun, Spaccia's attorney, referred to them Wednesday as "the emails that have become so famous.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb and Ruben Vives
When the city of Bell approached Randy Adams to be its police chief, he doubted the small, working-class town could afford him. Adams, who had recently retired as Glendale's police chief, wanted a salary in excess of $400,000. He was stunned when Bell officials said they would meet his demand. “I was surprised that a little city like this could afford to hire me,” Adams testified Wednesday in the corruption trial of Angela Spaccia, the former city official who hired him in 2009.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb
In a surprise move Tuesday, former Bell Police Chief Randy Adams told a Los Angeles County Superior Court judge that he plans to testify in the corruption case against the city's second-in-command, Angela Spaccia. "I will testify," said Adams, who in one brief appearance on the witness stand had invoked the 5th Amendment against self-incrimination 20 times. Adams is expected to take the stand at 9:30 a.m. Wednesday.  DOCUMENT: Deposition of Randy Adams He may help fill in some of the blanks in the scandal that rocked the small city in southeastern Los Angeles County and forced him from his job. Although he was named in a state attorney general's lawsuit against eight Bell officials, he has not been charged with a crime.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb and Ruben Vives
The corruption trial of Bell's former assistant administrator got a jolt Wednesday when prosecutors showed the jury a photo of her smoking a cigar while wearing a white bathrobe. Prosecutors in the corruption case said Angela Spaccia - the second in command in the small city in southeast Los Angeles County city - sent the photo via text message to the city's police chief, Randy Adams. Adams, testifying for the first time in the Bell corruption trials, said the photo was a joke and that he had known Spaccia for more than 30 years, starting with when they worked together in Ventura.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb and Ruben Vives
When the city of Bell approached Randy Adams to be its police chief, he doubted the small, working-class town could afford him. Adams, who had recently retired as Glendale's police chief, wanted a salary in excess of $400,000. The city agreed. "I was surprised that a little city like this could afford to hire me," Adams, 62, testified Wednesday in the corruption trial of Angela Spaccia, the former city official who hired him in 2009. In taking the stand, Adams spoke publicly for the first time about the Bell scandal, providing fresh details about the inner workings of City Hall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb and Ruben Vives
After years of silence, the former police chief of Bell took the witness stand Wednesday and testified that he was initially “suspicious” about taking the job in the working-class town because of the long legacy of corruption in southeast Los Angeles County. Randy Adams, who was one of the highest-paid law enforcement officials in the nation when he was forced from his job, said he was stunned by the salary the city offered to pay him. “I was surprised that a little city like this could afford to hire me” Adams testified.
NEWS
September 27, 1986 | Associated Press
The 33-year-old wife of an American Protestant missionary and the couple's Filipino maid were stabbed to death in their home by two masked men, police said Friday. Police said Randy Adams of Columbus, Ohio, and 24-year-old Consuelo Alla were killed in the attack Thursday in this southern city, about 620 miles southeast of Manila. In Manila, a family friend, Larry Baldock, said Randy Adams' husband, William Charles Adams, is a missionary with Youth With a Mission, a Protestant organization.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb and Ruben Vives
After years of silence, the former police chief of Bell took the witness stand Wednesday and testified that he was initially “suspicious” about taking the job in the working-class town because of the long legacy of corruption in southeast Los Angeles County. Randy Adams, who was one of the highest-paid law enforcement officials in the nation when he was forced from his job, said he was stunned by the salary the city offered to pay him. “I was surprised that a little city like this could afford to hire me” Adams testified.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb
He walked into the courtroom Tuesday, dressed in a dark blue suit, and sat in the front row. Everyone was certain this would be another perfunctory appearance by former Bell Police Chief Randy Adams, who in one brief appearance on the witness stand had invoked the 5th Amendment against self-incrimination 20 times. But when Adams stood up and Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Kathleen Kennedy asked what he planned to do, the former lawman surprised everyone in the courtroom.
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