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Randy Borman

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March 21, 1993 | JACK EPSTEIN, Jack Epstein, a free-lance writer based in Rio de Janeiro, is a contributor to the Pacific News Service and the San Francisco Chronicle.
TWO DOZEN OIL PROSPECTORS WERE HACKING a trail through the deep Ecuadorean jungle just off the shores of the Aguarico River when they found themselves surrounded by a group of Cofan Indians. Gripping their machetes, the Ecuadoreans prepared for the worst. During the previous five years, various tribes of Amazon Indians had beaten or killed several prospectors trespassing on their land, and these oilmen had not bothered to get permission from the Cofans to carry out seismic studies.
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MAGAZINE
April 25, 1993
Thanks for Jack Epstein's "Rain Forest Man" (March 21). Too many times, missionaries get blamed for destroying native cultures. Often, the truth is that the natives' first contact with civilization has been with traders, oil companies, gold seekers, etc.--none of whom have the natives' interest at heart. Randy Borman's parents not only translated the Bible into the Cofan language, but they also preserved the Cofan legends by translating them into Spanish and English. MERILYN WALKER Glendale
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MAGAZINE
April 25, 1993
Thanks for Jack Epstein's "Rain Forest Man" (March 21). Too many times, missionaries get blamed for destroying native cultures. Often, the truth is that the natives' first contact with civilization has been with traders, oil companies, gold seekers, etc.--none of whom have the natives' interest at heart. Randy Borman's parents not only translated the Bible into the Cofan language, but they also preserved the Cofan legends by translating them into Spanish and English. MERILYN WALKER Glendale
MAGAZINE
March 21, 1993 | JACK EPSTEIN, Jack Epstein, a free-lance writer based in Rio de Janeiro, is a contributor to the Pacific News Service and the San Francisco Chronicle.
TWO DOZEN OIL PROSPECTORS WERE HACKING a trail through the deep Ecuadorean jungle just off the shores of the Aguarico River when they found themselves surrounded by a group of Cofan Indians. Gripping their machetes, the Ecuadoreans prepared for the worst. During the previous five years, various tribes of Amazon Indians had beaten or killed several prospectors trespassing on their land, and these oilmen had not bothered to get permission from the Cofans to carry out seismic studies.
BOOKS
June 16, 1996 | CHRIS GOODRICH
AMAZON STRANGER A Rainforest Chief Battles Big Oil by Mike Tidwell (Lyons & Burford: $22.95; 216 pp.). Years from now some researcher's jaw will drop upon noticing the enormous number of books on the Amazon rain forest published during the 1990s.
NEWS
July 27, 1989 | BOB SIPCHEN, Times Staff Writer
The Stones and the Who do warm-up appearances of sorts, but it's Axl Rose, the new bad boy of hard rock who made the cover of the Aug. 10 issue of Rolling Stone. This passing of the mantle to the next generation of self-styled degenerate is a smooth one. Like the Who, Rose has a penchant for smashing up rooms; like some of the Stones, he has done his dance with illegal drugs.
TRAVEL
March 6, 1988 | CATHERINE HEALY, Healy writes books and articles about Latin America. She is associate editor of Americas magazine. and
Latin America is my passion, and so I went south again recently to discover other curiosities that I had to see in order to fulfill a search for contentment. My list is set forth to entice you if you haven't yet looped around South America. And if you have, to remind you that once is not enough. Consider, then, these prizes: Natal, Brazil: Miles of tremendous dunes sweep down to the Atlantic Ocean on this easternmost tip of the continent.
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