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ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2002 | JON BURLINGAME, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If one of the recurring musical themes in NBC's coverage of the Winter Olympics seemed familiar to viewers, perhaps that's because it's been around for a while. We're not talking about "Bugler's Dream," the 1958 Leo Arnaud piece that has become the traditional Olympic fanfare, or the John Williams themes that have become a staple of Olympic coverage (particularly the 1984 fanfare, used extensively by NBC, along with his new "Call of the Champions," written for the Salt Lake City Games).
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2002 | JON BURLINGAME, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If one of the recurring musical themes in NBC's coverage of the Winter Olympics seemed familiar to viewers, perhaps that's because it's been around for a while. We're not talking about "Bugler's Dream," the 1958 Leo Arnaud piece that has become the traditional Olympic fanfare, or the John Williams themes that have become a staple of Olympic coverage (particularly the 1984 fanfare, used extensively by NBC, along with his new "Call of the Champions," written for the Salt Lake City Games).
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 1992 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Beethoven" (citywide) is a medium-level comedy about a lovable Saint Bernard, a dog-loving family and a dog-phobic dad. It's a consciously naive movie--big, bright, cartoonish and kind of empty--but it isn't the doggy dud that "Bingo" was. It isn't another slap-happy, yuppie-puppie milk-bone of a movie, sentimental and nasty by turns. There's some feeling in it, enough, for the right kind of undemanding audience, to make it a pleasant time-passer.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 1996 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the same grace and discipline that he displays in front of the camera, Jean-Claude Van Damme makes a socko directorial debut with "The Quest," a martial arts adventure odyssey that's epic in scale and high in style. In co-writing (with Frank Dux) the film's original story, Van Damme and screenwriters Steven Klein and Paul Mones have created engaging starring roles for Van Damme and his co-star, Roger Moore, in his best part since he retired from playing James Bond.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1995 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Billy Madison" looks as if it were made to fill the void left by Pee-wee Herman. We never needed Pee-wee more. Adam Sandler plays Billy Madison, a spoiled rich nudnik who stands to inherit the family business from his hotel tycoon father (Darren McGavin)--except Madison Sr. seems to think his jerky scion isn't up to it. For one thing, the only reason he graduated public school is because his father paid off the teachers.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1996 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the beginning of "Down Periscope," a routine, mildly funny service comedy, Bruce Dern, as an uptight admiral, describes Kelsey Grammer's veteran captain as "impulsive, undisciplined and even reckless at times." As a result, Grammer winds up commanding a World War II diesel-powered submarine, manned with misfits, that is to be pitted against the Navy's nuclear fleet in a war game. It's too bad for the film that the captain doesn't quite fit the admiral's description.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2000 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The hilarious, knockabout "Shanghai Noon," Jackie Chan's best American picture to date, breathes fresh life into the virtually dormant comedy-western. It also marks the relaxed and confident directorial debut of Tom Dey, working from a consistently funny, inventive and perceptive script by Alfred Gough and Miles Millar, whose previous major screen credit was "Lethal Weapon 4."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2002 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The answer to "Who Is Cletis Tout?" lies in a gem of a romantic crime comedy that turns out to be clever, amusing and unpredictable. Writer-director Chris Ver Wiel, in only his second feature, has some fresh ideas and knows just what to do with an ensemble cast headed by Christian Slater, with Tim Allen, Richard Dreyfuss, RuPaul, Billy Connolly and "Ally McBeal's" Portia de Rossi.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1991 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Was it only a few years ago that John Travolta was a '70s movie sensation, an urban youth movie sex-idol who seemed to blend Brando's brooding with Presley's swagger? In "Shout" (citywide), looking a bit fleshy and tired, Travolta is already trying to pass the torch. But there's nobody to pick it up--at least in this witless, over-pretty dud of a youth musical.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 1997 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Leave It to Beaver," the latest vintage TV series to get the big-screen treatment, is probably going to please a lot of people with its affectionate depiction of idealized small-city family life. Its makers have rounded up a good cast, headed by Cameron Finley as the adorable 8-year-old Beaver who's forever trying to do the right thing but tends to get derailed momentarily by older kids and adults. Warmth and humor abound. The trouble is that the picture is hopelessly synthetic.
BUSINESS
December 18, 1994 | RUTH RYON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
LOUIS JOURDAN, who played the romantic lead in dozens of films including "Gigi"(1958) and "Three Coins in the Fountain"(1954), and his wife, Quique, have put their Beverly Hills-area home on the market at just under $1.4 million. They plan to move back to their native France. "They miss Europe," a source said. Their home was described as "a villa with a magical garden that is breathtaking at night, the way it is lit." It has three bedrooms and a maid's quarters in 3,000 square feet.
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