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April 28, 1994 | ROBERT LEVINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During the 1992 riots, when most Angelenos were hunkering down at home, writer and filmmaker Randy Holland was out driving around, just trying to fathom all the fury and rage behind the fires, looting and destruction that he saw. "I had to see things for myself," Holland, 46, explains during an interview in the Marina del Rey home he shares with his wife, Julia, and their two young children. "I was shocked. I was blown away. I wanted to find out why it was happening."
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NEWS
August 6, 1995 | Kevin Thomas
This 90-minute 1994 documentary by Randy Holland (pictured) has done such a thorough job of researching the roots of the 1992 L.A. riots that the event itself takes on a quality of tragic inevitability. Holland demolishes indifference in this telling, first by sketching the difficult history of African Americans in Southern California, and then by letting the people of South Central L.A. speak for themselves (Showtime Tuesday at 11 a.m.).
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NEWS
August 6, 1995 | Kevin Thomas
This 90-minute 1994 documentary by Randy Holland (pictured) has done such a thorough job of researching the roots of the 1992 L.A. riots that the event itself takes on a quality of tragic inevitability. Holland demolishes indifference in this telling, first by sketching the difficult history of African Americans in Southern California, and then by letting the people of South Central L.A. speak for themselves (Showtime Tuesday at 11 a.m.).
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1994 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In "The Fire This Time" documentarian Randy Holland has done such a thorough soul-searching job of researching the roots of the 1992 L.A. riots that the event itself takes on a quality of tragic inevitability. Most people who will see this film--and countless others who probably will not--are aware of the pervasiveness of racial inequality and injustice. Almost everyone, regardless of his or her opinions, has been inundated by images of the riots on TV or in newspapers or magazines.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1994 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In "The Fire This Time" documentarian Randy Holland has done such a thorough soul-searching job of researching the roots of the 1992 L.A. riots that the event itself takes on a quality of tragic inevitability. Most people who will see this film--and countless others who probably will not--are aware of the pervasiveness of racial inequality and injustice. Almost everyone, regardless of his or her opinions, has been inundated by images of the riots on TV or in newspapers or magazines.
SPORTS
February 4, 2013 | By Mike DiGiovanna
"Drugs had destroyed my body and my mind and my spirit. I could no longer experience happiness or surprise. I couldn't remember the last time I felt spontaneous joy. Why was I even alive?" Josh Hamilton in his autobiography, "Beyond Belief" WESTLAKE, Texas -- It was 2 a.m. when Josh Hamilton, strung out on crack cocaine, his once-robust 6-foot-4, 230-pound body withered to 180 pounds, most of his $3.96-million signing bonus squandered on booze and drugs, staggered up the steps to his grandmother's house in Raleigh, N.C. Homeless, dirty and barely coherent, Hamilton was a few days removed from a suicide attempt -- an overdose of pills -- and in the fourth year of a harrowing drug addiction that caused the former can't-miss prospect to be banned from baseball for three full seasons.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Clarence Alexander "Skip" Scarborough, 58, who shared a Grammy in songwriting for "Giving You the Best That I Got," died of cancer July 3 in Los Angeles. Scarborough lived in Owings Mills, Md., but was in the Southland to visit family and work on a songwriting project. He earned his Grammy, with co-writer Randy Holland, in 1988 for best R&B song. The single of "Giving You the Best" was recorded by Anita Baker.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Kay Ameche, 101, an artist sometimes likened to Grandma Moses because she began to paint in her 60s, died July 26 of natural causes in a Los Angeles residential facility, said her son, Randy Holland. Ameche grew up near Chicago, where she was taken out of school at age 8 to help support her large family. After they relocated to Southern California, she earned her high school diploma at night and trained to be a nurse during the day.
NEWS
June 12, 1994
In his essay "What About the Plan?" (Voices, May 22), Randy Holland states: "The city was not only neglected but sabotaged, either consciously or unconsciously, by the system. In some ways it was conscious, like the out-and-out sabotage of cultural organizations like the Watts Writers Workshop, which started in the wake of the '65 riots . . . which was infiltrated by the FBI and the LAPD." Wrong. At the age of 19, I was briefly a member of the Watts Writers Workshop. I left in an outrage because the workshop was "infiltrated" by a "system" of ignorance, bluster and silliness.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2000
ABC was the big winner among the networks during Friday night's 27th Annual Daytime Emmy Awards ceremonies in New York's Radio City Music Hall with five Emmys to add to the 12 it took home a week earlier, when the more technical categories were announced. During the evening, veteran journalist Barbara Walters received the Lifetime Achievement Award. The winners--by category and network--follow: Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series: Susan Flannery, "The Bold & the Beautiful," CBS.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1994 | ROBERT LEVINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During the 1992 riots, when most Angelenos were hunkering down at home, writer and filmmaker Randy Holland was out driving around, just trying to fathom all the fury and rage behind the fires, looting and destruction that he saw. "I had to see things for myself," Holland, 46, explains during an interview in the Marina del Rey home he shares with his wife, Julia, and their two young children. "I was shocked. I was blown away. I wanted to find out why it was happening."
NATIONAL
March 18, 2008 | From the Associated Press
A conservation group said Monday it has an agreement to protect nearly 1,500 acres of private mining claims northeast of Yellowstone National Park. The plan calls for the Trust for Public Land to use $8 million in federal money to buy the claims and convey them to the U.S. Forest Service, ending the fight over the proposed New World Mine near Cooke City. "We're hoping in the next several months . . . that we will be able to work with Congress and our partners, the Forest Service, to do everything that we can to make sure our funding request is made good on," said Alex Diekmann of the Trust for Public Land.
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