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Randy Jacobs

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1997 | SARA SCRIBNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Guitarist Randy Jacobs can speak at length about the wonderful memories he has had working as a session player on scores of records by such celebrated artists as Bonnie Raitt and B.B. King. But, he says, none of that compares to the excitement of being in the spotlight with your own band. And that's where he is these days as the co-leader of the Boneshakers, a spirited quartet that blends smooth Detroit soul with Muscle Shoals-style R&B. "Working with Bonnie Raitt was great, working with B.B.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1997 | SARA SCRIBNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Guitarist Randy Jacobs can speak at length about the wonderful memories he has had working as a session player on scores of records by such celebrated artists as Bonnie Raitt and B.B. King. But, he says, none of that compares to the excitement of being in the spotlight with your own band. And that's where he is these days as the co-leader of the Boneshakers, a spirited quartet that blends smooth Detroit soul with Muscle Shoals-style R&B. "Working with Bonnie Raitt was great, working with B.B.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1990 | KENNETH J. GARCIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last month, Mandeville Canyon homeowner Randy Jacobs followed the morning ritual of sending his three Yorkshire terriers through a kitchen doggy door into the back yard. But awaiting their arrival was one wily coyote, who snapped one of the dogs up in its jaws and disappeared over a six-foot chain-link fence as Jacobs looked on helplessly. Neighbor Maureen Gratten watched the coyote scamper through her yard, where she plays with her month-old twins and two older children.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 1996 | SCOTT COLLINS
Though rock icon Jim Morrison died in 1971, his fame and following seem to grow each passing year. But even a hard-core Morrison fan will probably find little appealing about "Desperate Land," Rich Jacobs' one-act at Stage of Grace in Hollywood. The play is set in 1980 in Paris' famed Pere-Lachaise cemetery, where five of the Morrison faithful have camped beside the singer's grave to celebrate his birthday and indulge in some sexual and alcoholic excess. The quintet includes nerdy Tim (Rene L.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 1988 | JIM WASHBURN
Was (Not Was) is (is not) one of the greatest groups of the '80s, with a performance Thursday at the Coach House in San Juan Capistrano, showing the group leaning ever closer to the "is" category. The ungainly infant of record producer Don Fagenson and former jazz critic David Weiss (professionally known as Don and David Was), Was (Not Was) has existed for most of this decade as a loose studio aggregation.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2008 | Ann Powers, Times Staff Writer
Don Was kept it simple, pushing his bass to the side as he introduced the long-missed conglomeration onstage at the Orpheum Theatre on Thursday night. "We're Was (Not Was)," he said. "From Detroit." He spoke the truth, though several decades separated the band's original members from their funky hometown.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2000 | ZANTO PEABODY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a kid growing up in Brentwood, Alan Sides was obsessed with music. To get the perfect sound, he started building his own loudspeakers. To showcase the sound of his speakers, he started making his own recordings. The quest for perfection eventually led Sides to start his own recording studio. He began with jazz and rhythm and blues artists, but today his client roster is firmly rooted in pop music.
NEWS
December 23, 2004 | Richard Cromelin, Times Staff Writer
In the early '80s, the tranquillity of Morning in America was disrupted by a fearsome funk hybrid out of Detroit, a crazy melange of dance music and spoken collage, heavy-metal guitar and beat poetry, free jazz and Motown.
BUSINESS
July 27, 1996 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just three years ago, Subaru of America--the sometimes-quirky auto company that once prospered by catering to suburban and rural drivers in the Snowbelt--lay in a shambles. Crippled by the rising yen and strategic mistakes, Subaru sales had fallen for seven years. The company lost $750 million in the same period and was considered likely to withdraw from the U.S. market.
NEWS
September 20, 1990 | KENNETH J. GARCIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last month, Mandeville Canyon homeowner Randy Jacobs followed the morning ritual of sending his three Yorkshire terriers through a kitchen doggy door into the back yard. But awaiting their arrival was one wily coyote, who snapped one of the dogs up in its jaws and disappeared over a six-foot chain-link fence as Jacobs looked on helplessly. Neighbor Maureen Gratten watched the coyote scamper through her yard, where she plays with her month-old twins and two older children.
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