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Randy Komisar

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BUSINESS
November 23, 1994 | GINA SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There's a lot of talk these days about the so-called convergence of Silicon Valley and Hollywood, but the topic is old hat for San Rafael-based LucasArts Entertainment Co., one of three George Lucas-owned and operated entertainment firms. Unlike the other two--Lucasfilm Ltd. and Lucas Digital Ltd., which is the parent of Industrial Light & Magic and Skywalker Sound--LucasArts is dedicated solely to creating digital interactive entertainment.
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BUSINESS
November 23, 1994 | GINA SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There's a lot of talk these days about the so-called convergence of Silicon Valley and Hollywood, but the topic is old hat for San Rafael-based LucasArts Entertainment Co., one of three George Lucas-owned and operated entertainment firms. Unlike the other two--Lucasfilm Ltd. and Lucas Digital Ltd., which is the parent of Industrial Light & Magic and Skywalker Sound--LucasArts is dedicated solely to creating digital interactive entertainment.
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BUSINESS
November 2, 1993
Randy Komisar has been named president and chief executive of Lucasarts Entertainment Co., the multimedia division of filmmaker George Lucas' San Rafael, Calif.-based entertainment firm. Previously, Komisar was vice president of business operations at GO Corp., a pioneer in pen-operated computer technology. His appointment fills a key position in Lucas' year-old restructuring plan, aimed at positioning the company to compete in an accelerating digital age.
BUSINESS
November 2, 1993
Randy Komisar has been named president and chief executive of Lucasarts Entertainment Co., the multimedia division of filmmaker George Lucas' San Rafael, Calif.-based entertainment firm. Previously, Komisar was vice president of business operations at GO Corp., a pioneer in pen-operated computer technology. His appointment fills a key position in Lucas' year-old restructuring plan, aimed at positioning the company to compete in an accelerating digital age.
BUSINESS
June 2, 2000
Your Weekend Viewing/Listening Some highlights of business programming. (All times are Pacific time.) Today * Noon: "Noon Business Hour." (KFWB-AM [980]) * 1 p.m.: 'Business Hour With Bob McCormick.' (KNX-AM [1070]) * 3:30 p.m., 7 p.m., 8:30 p.m.: 'Moneyline.' (CNN) * 4 p.m.: 'Market Week With Maria Bartiromo.' Bob Pittman, president of America Online. (CNBC; also airs at 4 p.m. and 11 p.m. Saturday and Sunday) * 5:30 p.m.: 'Nightly Business Report.' Peter Green, editor, Green on Money.
BUSINESS
May 20, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
Microsoft Corp. has been asked by Justice Department antitrust investigators to provide more information about its proposed $425-million acquisition of WebTV Networks Inc. The Justice Department move signals that federal antitrust officials are taking a close look at the transaction, and it extends the legal deadline for a required federal pre-merger review until at least 20 days after Microsoft and WebTV provide the requested information.
NEWS
June 5, 2003 | Susan Carpenter, Times Staff Writer
Go to med school. Get an MBA. Take the GRE. Find a job. When students finish college, they're bombarded with advice. But advice, well intentioned as it may be, isn't always what a fresh grad needs. It's just "noise," according to Mike Marriner and Nathan Gebhard, authors of the book "Road Trip Nation: A Guide to Discovering Your Path in Life." It's the noise of "society trying to push, pull and tug you," they write in the book's introduction.
BUSINESS
May 22, 2000 | GARY CHAPMAN
Are we closing in on another era of business scandals and suspect ethics? Will the "new economy" wind up repeating the behavior of the notorious "Me Decade," the 1980s? Fortune magazine, in a March cover story on business ethics in the new economy, said, "Questionable behavior is Silicon Valley's next big thing." The money to be made in the new economy is not only creating great temptations, it is also creating some new ways of doing business that may skirt the edges of ethical behavior.
BUSINESS
February 17, 2001 | ALEX PHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For more than 20 years, Microsoft Corp. has had a presence in Silicon Valley. In the early days, its small outposts served as little more than brief stopping-off points for company executives before they flew home to headquarters in Redmond, Wash. But as the technology world shifts its focus away from the personal computers upon which Microsoft built its fortunes to the Internet, Palms and other wireless devices, the software behemoth needs new friends to conquer new markets.
BUSINESS
December 23, 2002 | David Streitfeld, Times Staff Writer
In the heyday of the technology boom, any analyst, venture capitalist, investment banker or entrepreneur who didn't become filthy rich just wasn't trying. Greed wasn't merely good; it was the fuel that powered the system. Last week's agreement between regulators and 10 top Wall Street firms aims to stamp out the things that greed inspired: conflicts of interest, sweetheart transactions, chicanery, lying and fraud.
BUSINESS
May 4, 2004 | Walter Hamilton and Thomas S. Mulligan, Times Staff Writers
Frank Quattrone, the former Silicon Valley investment banker who brought some of the nation's hottest technology companies to Wall Street, was convicted Monday of trying to obstruct government probes into new stock offerings. Quattrone sat stone-faced as U.S. District Judge Richard Owen read the verdict pronouncing him guilty of two counts of obstruction of justice and one count of witness tampering in a case that stemmed from a brief e-mail he wrote to his staff 3 1/2 years ago.
BUSINESS
February 4, 2008 | Michelle Quinn, Joseph Menn and Jessica Guynn, Times Staff Writers
. -- It was a tenet of faith: If you worked in Silicon Valley, Microsoft Corp. was evil. During the 1990s, Microsoft used its monopoly in computer operating systems to bully so many Silicon Valley companies that some people called it the Beast from Redmond, a reference to its headquarters in Redmond, Wash. Smaller tech players did everything they could to stay out of its way. Microsoft's current main competitor on the Web, Google Inc., still doesn't look kindly on the software giant.
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