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Randy Kraft

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 1989 | Compiled by Times staff writer Jerry Hicks
Randy Steven Kraft, charged with murdering 16 men, is on trial in Orange County Superior Court in what some legal experts say will be the biggest and costliest case in California history. LAST WEEK Kraft's sister and cousin, the first family members to testify, said Kraft was planning and attending his father's birthday party on the weekend that he allegedly killed two men. The trial halted after two days because of illness and scheduling problems among jurors.
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NEWS
July 20, 1998 | GEOFF BOUCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an unmarked graveyard for the cars of killers and dead men, every rusting heap tells a tale of past horrors. The van used by serial killer William G. Bonin to cruise for victims is here, filled with plastic tarps and puddles, but chunks remain from the carpet that linked him to several victims. In another corner of the lot, a knife murderer's keys dangle from the ignition of his rotting car, as if he might return some day and drive off.
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NEWS
May 3, 1991 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
S uperior Court Judge Donald A. McCartin's eighth-floor courtroom in downtown Santa Ana has a peculiar notoriety: Two of the nation's most sensational trials played out there with shocking, oftentimes gruesome, revelations. In 1989, McCartin sentenced Long Beach serial killer Randy Kraft to death for the mutilation murders of 16 young men.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1997 | JERRY HICKS
Every time I drive north on Interstate 5 near the Oso Parkway exit in Mission Viejo, my mind wanders back to that spring night almost 15 years ago when Randy Kraft was stopped there by two California Highway Patrol officers. Kraft's auto had weaved across the lanes, so the officers stopped him for a sobriety test. What they discovered was a dead hitchhiker--a Camp Pendleton Marine--in the front seat next to him.
NEWS
August 11, 1989 | From Times wire services
"Score card killer" Randy Kraft should die in the gas chamber for his two-decade spree of sexual violence and mutilation that left at least 16 young men and boys dead, a jury decided today. The jury had convicted Kraft of 16 murders May 12. They began deliberations Wednesday on the penalty. Orange County Superior Court Judge Donald A. McCartin will sentence Kraft on Oct 27. He can reduce the punishment to life imprisonment. A death sentence will automatically be appealed.
NEWS
March 8, 1987 | JERRY HICKS, Times Staff Writer
It began with a routine traffic stop. At 1:10 a.m. on May 14, 1983, two California Highway Patrol officers pulled over a brown Toyota Celica that had been weaving on the San Diego Freeway in Mission Viejo. Behind the wheel was Randy Steven Kraft; next to him was a Marine in his mid-20s, apparently asleep. Within minutes, after a rough shake failed to rouse the Marine and they could find no pulse, the officers suspected that they had a homicide on their hands.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1989 | JERRY HICKS, Times Staff Writer
Arvetta and Denver Sayre of Santa Ana know that no one will ever be tried for the murder of their teen-age son 10 years ago. But Arvetta Sayre took vacation this week to see Randy Steven Kraft receive a jury's verdict. It's the closest thing to justice they expect to get. Fifteen-year-old Jeffre Sayre is one of 21 young men in Southern California whose deaths are linked to Kraft by prosecutors, but not included in his trial. Deputy Dist. Atty. Bryan F.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1989 | JERRY HICKS, Times Staff Writer
When C. Thomas McDonald agreed to help defend Randy Steven Kraft, the attorney was prepared for an ordeal. But the enormity of it all escaped him at the time. "I thought it might take 2 years out of my life at most." It may end up more like 5. Since 1984, McDonald and his colleague James G. Merwin have represented Kraft, who is charged with the murders of 16 young men in Orange County.
BOOKS
May 19, 1991 | Chris Goodrich
ANGEL OF DARKNESS: The True Story of Randy Kraft and the Most Heinous Murder Spree of the Century by Dennis McDougal (Warner Books: $19.95; 330 pp.). On May 14, 1983, while cruising Interstate 5, two highway patrolmen pulled over a man in Mission Viejo on suspicion of drunk driving. It was a routine stop--until a patrolman discovered that the Toyota's front-seat passenger was dead, strangled with his own belt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1992 | JERRY HICKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bryan F. Brown, Orange County's celebrated homicide prosecutor who won convictions of two of the state's most notorious serial killers, announced his resignation Wednesday from the district attorney's office, where he has spent his entire career. Brown, who recently turned 50, will go into private practice with Newport Beach civil attorney Richard R. Farnell, a former prosecutor who was close to Brown when they were colleagues.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 1992 | JESS BRAVIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Throughout six years in jail, a 13-month trial and two years on Death Row, only one motive has officially been attributed to Randy Kraft, convicted of the sex murders of 16 young men and suspected of killing more than 60. Kraft, a close friend told police, had once said he had heard that "the ultimate orgasm is in death."
BOOKS
May 19, 1991 | Chris Goodrich
ANGEL OF DARKNESS: The True Story of Randy Kraft and the Most Heinous Murder Spree of the Century by Dennis McDougal (Warner Books: $19.95; 330 pp.). On May 14, 1983, while cruising Interstate 5, two highway patrolmen pulled over a man in Mission Viejo on suspicion of drunk driving. It was a routine stop--until a patrolman discovered that the Toyota's front-seat passenger was dead, strangled with his own belt.
NEWS
May 3, 1991 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
S uperior Court Judge Donald A. McCartin's eighth-floor courtroom in downtown Santa Ana has a peculiar notoriety: Two of the nation's most sensational trials played out there with shocking, oftentimes gruesome, revelations. In 1989, McCartin sentenced Long Beach serial killer Randy Kraft to death for the mutilation murders of 16 young men.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1990
I am very disappointed that you think I would be interested in what Randy Kraft does while on Death Row (Newswatch, Oct. 16). Why you would take up valuable space to report on something so insignificant boggles my mind when there are so many worthwhile subjects that need publicity and are not getting it. For example, how about reporting on the needs of the handicapped, the fact that baby food and diapers are needed at the Tustin Air Station, or...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1988
An Orange County Superior Court judge has set July 21 to begin jury selection in the trial of accused serial killer Randy Kraft, whose case has been mired in the courts for about five years. Judge Donald A. McCartin set the date after refusing to hear defense arguments that the case was being unnecessarily rushed to trial. About 5,000 prospective jurors are expected to be considered before 12 are finally selected. The trial is expected to last two years.
NEWS
November 30, 1989 | MARY LOU FULTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Darwin Hall traveled all the way from Idaho to watch Randy Steven Kraft's face as he was sentenced to die for the savage sex murder of Hall's son and 15 other young men in Orange County. And Hall wasn't about to leave without getting the last word. As the audience struggled to its feet after court was dismissed Wednesday morning, the heavy-set Hall stood up and shouted, "Burn in hell, Kraft! Turn around and look!"
NEWS
August 12, 1989 | JERRY HICKS, Times Staff Writer
Randy Steven Kraft, a 44-year-old computer genius portrayed by prosecutors as perhaps the most prolific serial killer in the country, was condemned to death by a jury Friday for the gruesome murders of 16 young men in Orange County. Kraft sat with his hands folded, tapping his thumbs together, as he heard the death verdict. He whispered to one of his attorneys to have the 10 women and two men on the jury polled individually about their verdict.
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