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Randy Scheunemann

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NATIONAL
August 17, 2008 | Bob Drogin, Times Staff Writer
Randy Scheunemann operated for years deep inside Republican foreign policy circles, a burly, bearded lobbyist with powerful patrons, neoconservative credentials and little public profile. Today, as John McCain's top foreign policy and national security advisor, Scheunemann serves as spokesman and surrogate for the probable GOP presidential nominee on issues from NATO enlargement to gun control in American cities. Scheunemann's dual roles came into sharp relief, and potential conflict, last week when McCain voiced impassioned support for Georgia after Russia's incursion into the Caucasus nation Aug. 8. Georgia, as it happened, is one of Scheunemann's former lobbying clients.
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NATIONAL
October 25, 2008 | Times Wire Reports
An acclaimed celebrity makeup artist for Republican vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin collected more money from John McCain's campaign than his foreign policy advisor. Amy Strozzi, who works on the reality show "So You Think You Can Dance" and has been Palin's traveling stylist, was paid $22,800, according to campaign finance reports for the first two weeks of October. McCain's foreign policy advisor, Randy Scheunemann, was paid $12,500, the report showed. McCain's campaign said the payment covered a portion of her work in September and a portion of October.
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NATIONAL
October 25, 2008 | Times Wire Reports
An acclaimed celebrity makeup artist for Republican vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin collected more money from John McCain's campaign than his foreign policy advisor. Amy Strozzi, who works on the reality show "So You Think You Can Dance" and has been Palin's traveling stylist, was paid $22,800, according to campaign finance reports for the first two weeks of October. McCain's foreign policy advisor, Randy Scheunemann, was paid $12,500, the report showed. McCain's campaign said the payment covered a portion of her work in September and a portion of October.
NEWS
August 24, 2008 | Andrew J. Bacevich, Andrew J. Bacevich, a professor of history and international relations at Boston University, is the author of the new book "The Limits of Power: The End of American Exceptionalism."
On inauguration day, a new U.S. president is a demigod, the embodiment of aspirations as vast as they are varied. Over the course of the years that follow, the president inevitably fails to fulfill those lofty hopes. So the cycle begins anew, and Americans look to the next occupant of the Oval Office to undo his predecessor's mistakes and usher in an era of lasting peace and sustained prosperity. This time around, expectations are, if anything, loftier than usual. The youthful and charismatic Sen. Barack Obama casts himself as the standard-bearer of those keenest to fix Washington, redeem America and save the world.
NATIONAL
August 14, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
John McCain's chief foreign policy advisor and the advisor's business partner lobbied the senator or his staff on 49 occasions in a 3 1/2 -year span while being paid hundreds of thousands of dollars by the former Soviet republic of Georgia. The payments raise questions about the intersection of Randy Scheunemann's personal financial interests and his advice to the Republican presidential candidate, who is seizing on Russian aggression in Georgia as a campaign issue. McCain warned Russian leaders Tuesday that their assault in Georgia risks "the benefits they enjoy from being part of the civilized world."
NEWS
August 24, 2008 | Andrew J. Bacevich, Andrew J. Bacevich, a professor of history and international relations at Boston University, is the author of the new book "The Limits of Power: The End of American Exceptionalism."
On inauguration day, a new U.S. president is a demigod, the embodiment of aspirations as vast as they are varied. Over the course of the years that follow, the president inevitably fails to fulfill those lofty hopes. So the cycle begins anew, and Americans look to the next occupant of the Oval Office to undo his predecessor's mistakes and usher in an era of lasting peace and sustained prosperity. This time around, expectations are, if anything, loftier than usual. The youthful and charismatic Sen. Barack Obama casts himself as the standard-bearer of those keenest to fix Washington, redeem America and save the world.
NATIONAL
September 19, 2008 | Paul Richter
Some Spaniards are wondering whether John McCain has turned cool toward their prime minister -- or maybe can't remember him -- after confusing comments by the Republican presidential candidate. McCain was asked in an interview in Miami whether as president he would meet with Spanish Prime Minister Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero, a socialist who was snubbed by President Bush after he withdrew Spain's troops from Iraq in 2004.
OPINION
August 20, 2008
Re "Who got Georgia into this?," Opinion, Aug. 14 Rosa Brooks' excellent column points out the connection between Randy Scheunemann, John McCain's foreign policy advisor, and the current hostilities between Russia and Georgia. Scheunemann's lobbying firm is being paid handsomely by Georgia, which obviously expected the U.S. to rescue it when it picked a fight with Russia. I see another, more sinister connection. The U.S. has nothing to gain in Georgia. Our cozying up to Georgia, and McCain's supporting their claim to South Ossetia, are only aimed at provoking Russia.
WORLD
July 17, 2008 | Paul Richter, Times Staff Writer
The Bush administration's decision to abandon a long-held policy and meet with a top Iranian official on Tehran's nuclear program has intensified the political debate in Washington about how best to deal with America's adversaries. The White House decision was hailed Wednesday by Barack Obama, the presumed Democratic presidential nominee, who has criticized Republican rival John McCain and President Bush for spurning high-level talks with Iran in the past. Obama said the United States should "stay involved with the full strength of our diplomacy.
OPINION
August 14, 2008 | ROSA BROOKS
The Georgians have now been punished enough, declared Russian President Dmitry Medvedev on Tuesday. Or maybe not. At press time, Russian tanks were reportedly rolling through the Georgian city of Gori, in violation of a cease-fire agreement. So there could be more punishment in store for the Georgians, who were stupid enough to imagine that if they picked a fight with Russia over the disputed region of South Ossetia, Uncle Sam would come riding to their rescue. Puh-lease.
NATIONAL
August 17, 2008 | Bob Drogin, Times Staff Writer
Randy Scheunemann operated for years deep inside Republican foreign policy circles, a burly, bearded lobbyist with powerful patrons, neoconservative credentials and little public profile. Today, as John McCain's top foreign policy and national security advisor, Scheunemann serves as spokesman and surrogate for the probable GOP presidential nominee on issues from NATO enlargement to gun control in American cities. Scheunemann's dual roles came into sharp relief, and potential conflict, last week when McCain voiced impassioned support for Georgia after Russia's incursion into the Caucasus nation Aug. 8. Georgia, as it happened, is one of Scheunemann's former lobbying clients.
NATIONAL
August 14, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
John McCain's chief foreign policy advisor and the advisor's business partner lobbied the senator or his staff on 49 occasions in a 3 1/2 -year span while being paid hundreds of thousands of dollars by the former Soviet republic of Georgia. The payments raise questions about the intersection of Randy Scheunemann's personal financial interests and his advice to the Republican presidential candidate, who is seizing on Russian aggression in Georgia as a campaign issue. McCain warned Russian leaders Tuesday that their assault in Georgia risks "the benefits they enjoy from being part of the civilized world."
OPINION
June 19, 2008 | ROSA BROOKS
No one wants to be the first candidate to invoke Sept. 11. As a campaign tactic, 9/11 chest-thumping has become both predictable and tacky. So this week, John McCain's campaign hit on a creative solution: Invoke Sept. 10. Sept. 10? Yup. Barack Obama has "a Sept. 10 mind-set," McCain foreign policy advisor Randy Scheunemann informed reporters Tuesday. The idea, as Scheunemann explained for those too thick to grasp the implied insult, is that a "naive" Obama just doesn't get it about terrorism.
WORLD
September 17, 2004 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
Secretary-General Kofi Annan said that he thought the invasion of Iraq was illegal, prompting quick rebuttals from the United States and its allies in the war. Pressed repeatedly in a Wednesday interview with the BBC on whether the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq was illegal, Annan finally said, "Yes, if you wish." He added, "I have indicated it is not in conformity with the U.N. Charter. From our point of view and from the charter point of view it was illegal."
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