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Randy Shields

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September 20, 1992 | JULIE TAMAKI and MAYERENE BARKER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Randy Shields, a retired boxer from North Hollywood, was credited with saving the lives of customers and employees of a San Fernando Valley restaurant this weekend when he wounded two robbers in a running gun battle that spilled onto the street, police said. "When they said they were going to start killing people and that somebody was going to die, that's when I came up shooting," Shields, 36, a top welterweight contender a decade ago, said Saturday in explaining his role in the shootout.
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SPORTS
June 18, 1994 | FERNANDO DOMINGUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a scene straight out of a movie, but much more violent than the ones Randy Shields likes to write. There were no cameras rolling, no director giving instructions, no actors in a make-believe world. This was real-life drama, with loaded guns and two hardened criminals looking for an excuse to use them. And Shields, 38, a screenwriter and former top-flight boxer who grew up and still lives in North Hollywood, could see the ending was not going to play well in Peoria. Or anywhere else.
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SPORTS
June 18, 1994 | FERNANDO DOMINGUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a scene straight out of a movie, but much more violent than the ones Randy Shields likes to write. There were no cameras rolling, no director giving instructions, no actors in a make-believe world. This was real-life drama, with loaded guns and two hardened criminals looking for an excuse to use them. And Shields, 38, a screenwriter and former top-flight boxer who grew up and still lives in North Hollywood, could see the ending was not going to play well in Peoria. Or anywhere else.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1992 | JULIE TAMAKI and MAYERENE BARKER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A retired boxer from North Hollywood was credited with saving the lives of customers and employees of a Laurel Canyon Boulevard restaurant this weekend when he wounded two robbers in a running gun battle that spilled onto the street, police said. The shooting was one of five reported in northern Los Angeles County as the weekend got off to a violent start, leaving two people dead and five others wounded, authorities said Saturday.
SPORTS
September 22, 1990 | RICH TOSCHES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nineteen years ago, a tough kid from Grant High, a senior on the football team who in his 18 years had not found many other kids that he could not beat up, went looking for a fight. His quest took him all the way to North Hollywood High, where he roamed the campus and the halls for three days. Finally, Joe Goossen found his man. Well, his kid. He found Randy Shields, a 15-year-old sophomore who weighed 115 pounds. Goossen had heard the kid was tough. He wanted to see just how tough.
SPORTS
September 26, 1990 | RICH TOSCHES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When a boxer has not fought in nearly eight years and insists upon making a comeback, he looks for an opponent that closely resembles a punching bag. Randy Shields, once one of the premier welterweights in the world, thought he had found such a man in Stewart Baynes of Los Angeles. Baynes had all the credentials, most notably a 9-11 record. But Shields, whose last previous fight was in 1983, had forgotten what such a long retirement does to a boxer.
SPORTS
October 3, 1990 | RICH TOSCHES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Imagine this: A guy takes piles and piles of money out of your pockets and there is no way you can get the cash back. Your best friend then gains for you a measure of retribution by knocking the daylights out of the man. Now, be honest. Wouldn't that make you feel just a little bit better about the loss of your money? Of course it would. But brothers Dan and Joe Goossen of the Ten Goose Boxing Club in Van Nuys say no, it would not do a thing for them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1992 | JULIE TAMAKI and MAYERENE BARKER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A retired boxer from North Hollywood was credited with saving the lives of customers and employees of a Laurel Canyon Boulevard restaurant this weekend when he wounded two robbers in a running gun battle that spilled onto the street, police said. The shooting was one of five reported in northern Los Angeles County as the weekend got off to a violent start, leaving two people dead and five others wounded, authorities said Saturday.
SPORTS
September 20, 1992 | JULIE TAMAKI and MAYERENE BARKER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Randy Shields, a retired boxer from North Hollywood, was credited with saving the lives of customers and employees of a San Fernando Valley restaurant this weekend when he wounded two robbers in a running gun battle that spilled onto the street, police said. "When they said they were going to start killing people and that somebody was going to die, that's when I came up shooting," Shields, 36, a top welterweight contender a decade ago, said Saturday in explaining his role in the shootout.
SPORTS
October 3, 1990 | RICH TOSCHES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Imagine this: A guy takes piles and piles of money out of your pockets and there is no way you can get the cash back. Your best friend then gains for you a measure of retribution by knocking the daylights out of the man. Now, be honest. Wouldn't that make you feel just a little bit better about the loss of your money? Of course it would. But brothers Dan and Joe Goossen of the Ten Goose Boxing Club in Van Nuys say no, it would not do a thing for them.
SPORTS
September 26, 1990 | RICH TOSCHES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When a boxer has not fought in nearly eight years and insists upon making a comeback, he looks for an opponent that closely resembles a punching bag. Randy Shields, once one of the premier welterweights in the world, thought he had found such a man in Stewart Baynes of Los Angeles. Baynes had all the credentials, most notably a 9-11 record. But Shields, whose last previous fight was in 1983, had forgotten what such a long retirement does to a boxer.
SPORTS
September 22, 1990 | RICH TOSCHES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nineteen years ago, a tough kid from Grant High, a senior on the football team who in his 18 years had not found many other kids that he could not beat up, went looking for a fight. His quest took him all the way to North Hollywood High, where he roamed the campus and the halls for three days. Finally, Joe Goossen found his man. Well, his kid. He found Randy Shields, a 15-year-old sophomore who weighed 115 pounds. Goossen had heard the kid was tough. He wanted to see just how tough.
SPORTS
July 10, 1986 | STEVE SPRINGER, Times Staff Writer
Let's play a word game. If you see the words boxing trainer , what do you think of? An overweight, cigar-chomping, middle-aged man with food stains on his shirt, tobacco stains on his teeth and the ability to talk out of the side of his mouth in an unintelligible manner, right? Kind of like Burgess Meredith in the Rocky movies. Take a look at Joe Goossen and then think again. He is none of the above.
SPORTS
October 10, 1990
Randy Shields of North Hollywood, one of the top welterweights a decade ago, suffered a broken jaw in a Sept. 25 comeback fight and will be unable to fight or spar again until next year.
SPORTS
July 10, 1986 | STEVE SPRINGER, Times Staff Writer
Let's play a word game. If you see the words boxing trainer , what do you think of? An overweight, cigar-chomping, middle-aged man with food stains on his shirt, tobacco stains on his teeth and the ability to talk out of the side of his mouth in an unintelligible manner, right? Kind of like Burgess Meredith in the Rocky movies. Take a look at Joe Goossen and then think again. He is none of the above.
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