Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRandy Shilts
IN THE NEWS

Randy Shilts

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 9, 1987 | BOB SIPCHEN, Times Staff Writer
As he merged into the milling throng at the Castro Street fair in San Francisco last Sunday, Randy Shilts figured his chances were equally good of getting slugged or hugged. An openly gay reporter whose beat includes the most openly gay community in America, Shilts is used to being embroiled in the raucous fray of San Francisco politics. Last weekend, though, he thought that his presence might be particularly volatile.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1994 | STEVE WEINSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
About 6 1/2 years after NBC first began trying to turn Randy Shilts' landmark book on AIDS into a TV movie, "And the Band Played On" finally makes it to the network tonight. Only the movie isn't really NBC's at all. It's HBO's, which picked up the ball when NBC abandoned the project about four years ago. The film debuted on the pay-cable channel last September. NBC has edited about 40 minutes from the original to fit it into a two-hour time slot and make room for commercials.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 18, 1994 | JENIFER WARREN and RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Randy Shilts, a tenacious, award-winning journalist who became the nation's foremost chronicler of gay life and the AIDS epidemic, died early Thursday at his ranch in the Sonoma County redwoods. He was 42. Shilts, who learned he was infected with HIV in 1987, died of AIDS, according to a statement released by the San Francisco Chronicle, where Shilts worked as a national correspondent.
NEWS
March 27, 1994 | Howard Rosenberg
Only someone with a heart of granite would not be moved or angered on some level by HBO's ambitious, cameo-studded 1993 movie of the late Randy Shilts' chronicling of the government's public-health policy regarding the AIDS epidemic. Like the book, this newsreel-woven movie, written by Arnold Schulman and directed by Roger Spottiswoode, focuses on the band of pioneering anti-AIDS researchers and activists.
BOOKS
December 6, 1987 | Woodrow Myers Jr., Myers, state health commissioner of Indiana and currently president of the Assn. of State and Territorial Health Officials, recently resigned as vice chairman of the President's Commission on the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Epidemic
As I come to the 630th and last page of this book, it is 4:47 a.m. Even though I already know this long story well, even though in my professional life I have cared for AIDS patients and fought virtually all the public health policy battles Shilts outlines, I am left with an emptiness. There must be a 631st page, I think; there must be more.
BOOKS
May 2, 1993 | Robert Dawidoff, Dawidoff chairs the history department at the Claremont Graduate School, and is the author, with Michael Nava, of "Created Equal: Why Gay Rights Matter to America."
In 1978, several gay crew members of the Nathaniel Greene lived, as did their fellow sailors, in an apartment complex the Navy had rented for them. The gay roommates had fixed up their house in "high House & Garden style, and took turns preparing gourmet meals for one another." They got used to unannounced visits around mealtime from their unmarried, straight shipmates, who lived student-style and ate frozen dinners.
NEWS
March 9, 1993 | BETTIJANE LEVINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There are two reasons why Randy Shilts says he shouldn't be talking. First, he must conserve his strength while recovering from a collapsed lung, a complication of AIDS. Second, the publishers of his next book, "Conduct Unbecoming," threaten that "there will be no book" if the author doesn't close his mouth until late April when the volume hits stores. St. Martin's Press understandably wants interest pumped up when it will translate into sales, and not a week before.
NEWS
April 4, 1993
Re "Spelling Out Why Gays in Uniform Live in Fear (March 9): Anent the hoopla about Randy Shilts' about-to-be-published book "Conduct Unbecoming" (a lovely title), the real issue isn't should gays and lesbians be openly admitted into the armed forces. The real issue is should gays and lesbians be granted first-class citizenship, with all its protections and privileges, one of which is the privilege of being welcome to join the Armed Forces--should I be so inclined. HARRY HAY, Founder 1st Mattachine Society Los Angeles
NEWS
March 27, 1994 | Howard Rosenberg
Only someone with a heart of granite would not be moved or angered on some level by HBO's ambitious, cameo-studded 1993 movie of the late Randy Shilts' chronicling of the government's public-health policy regarding the AIDS epidemic. Like the book, this newsreel-woven movie, written by Arnold Schulman and directed by Roger Spottiswoode, focuses on the band of pioneering anti-AIDS researchers and activists.
MAGAZINE
May 23, 1993
I am completely baffled by all the uproar about gays in the military ("Conduct Unbecoming," by Randy Shilts, April 25). They've been there for hundreds of years, and by no means were Rome, the United States and England known for having wimpy armies. Julius Caesar's legions were said to have affectionately called their leader "every woman's husband and every man's wife." The leader of the Third Crusade, Richard the Lionhearted, King of England, was a documented homosexual. And those Roman legions who conquered an empire and the awesome English crusaders were certainly not a demoralized, limp-wristed lot. Yet, as our laws stand now, we would deprive our military of much talent and perhaps even genius.
NEWS
February 18, 1994 | JENIFER WARREN and RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Randy Shilts, a tenacious, award-winning journalist who became the nation's foremost chronicler of gay life and the AIDS epidemic, died early Thursday at his ranch in the Sonoma County redwoods. He was 42. Shilts, who learned he was infected with HIV in 1987, died of AIDS, according to a statement released by the San Francisco Chronicle, where Shilts worked as a national correspondent.
OPINION
July 25, 1993 | Danica Kirka, Danica Kirka was an articles editor for Opinion. She interviewed Randy Shilts at the author's home
Walking from the front door to his back yard can be an exhausting experience for author Randy Shilts. The jaunt makes him breathless. But even as he collapses into a lawn chair, Shilts' thoughts and words seem to spill out at a pace out of sync with his frail form. Diagnosed as being HIV positive before he plunged into the research for his best-selling book "Conduct Unbecoming: Gays & Lesbians in the U.S. Military," Shilts seems an unlikely firebrand in the raging debate.
MAGAZINE
May 23, 1993
I am completely baffled by all the uproar about gays in the military ("Conduct Unbecoming," by Randy Shilts, April 25). They've been there for hundreds of years, and by no means were Rome, the United States and England known for having wimpy armies. Julius Caesar's legions were said to have affectionately called their leader "every woman's husband and every man's wife." The leader of the Third Crusade, Richard the Lionhearted, King of England, was a documented homosexual. And those Roman legions who conquered an empire and the awesome English crusaders were certainly not a demoralized, limp-wristed lot. Yet, as our laws stand now, we would deprive our military of much talent and perhaps even genius.
BOOKS
May 2, 1993 | Robert Dawidoff, Dawidoff chairs the history department at the Claremont Graduate School, and is the author, with Michael Nava, of "Created Equal: Why Gay Rights Matter to America."
In 1978, several gay crew members of the Nathaniel Greene lived, as did their fellow sailors, in an apartment complex the Navy had rented for them. The gay roommates had fixed up their house in "high House & Garden style, and took turns preparing gourmet meals for one another." They got used to unannounced visits around mealtime from their unmarried, straight shipmates, who lived student-style and ate frozen dinners.
NEWS
April 4, 1993
Re "Spelling Out Why Gays in Uniform Live in Fear (March 9): Anent the hoopla about Randy Shilts' about-to-be-published book "Conduct Unbecoming" (a lovely title), the real issue isn't should gays and lesbians be openly admitted into the armed forces. The real issue is should gays and lesbians be granted first-class citizenship, with all its protections and privileges, one of which is the privilege of being welcome to join the Armed Forces--should I be so inclined. HARRY HAY, Founder 1st Mattachine Society Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1993 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, Judith Michaelson is a Times staff writer
The worlds of the real and the unreal, of the near sublime and the almost ridiculous, intersect at random on the set of "And the Band Played On," HBO's long-awaited television movie based on journalist Randy Shilts' landmark 1987 book about the first five years of AIDS in America.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1991 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"And the Band Played On," Randy Shilts' 1987 book about the history of AIDS, has hit another snag on the way to television. Director Joel Schumacher and HBO Pictures jointly announced Monday that Schumacher will not direct the TV movie, which until recently had been scheduled to go into production in Atlanta this month. Robert Cooper, senior vice president for HBO Pictures, said in a prepared statement that the pay-cable channel is still committed to turning the book into a film.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1988 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Compiled by Terry Atkinson
**** "And the Band Played On" by Randy Shilts. Read by Willem Dafoe, with an afterword by Shilts. Two cassettes, abridged. Simon & Schuster. Shilts' account, based on his articles for the San Francisco Chronicle, is the fullest yet on the identification of the AIDS epidemic (which was a long time even getting a name that scientists could agree on) and of the infuriatingly laggard official steps to cope with it.
NEWS
March 9, 1993 | BETTIJANE LEVINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There are two reasons why Randy Shilts says he shouldn't be talking. First, he must conserve his strength while recovering from a collapsed lung, a complication of AIDS. Second, the publishers of his next book, "Conduct Unbecoming," threaten that "there will be no book" if the author doesn't close his mouth until late April when the volume hits stores. St. Martin's Press understandably wants interest pumped up when it will translate into sales, and not a week before.
NEWS
February 17, 1993 | BETTIJANE LEVINE
Reporter Randy Shilts, author of an acclaimed history of the AIDS crisis, said in Tuesday's San Francisco Chronicle that he is infected with the AIDS virus. The news comes just as he has completed an important new book and two of his other books--"The Mayor of Castro Street" (about San Francisco's slain gay supervisor, Harvey Milk) and "And the Band Played On," (a history of the AIDS epidemic)--were pegged for release as major films.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|