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SPORTS
March 30, 1992 | RICH ROBERTS
Randy Smyth, a silver medalist in 1984, strengthened his comeback for the Barcelona Olympics by winning the Tornado catamaran class in the three-day Olympic Classes Regatta at Alamitos Bay Yacht Club ending Sunday. Smyth, with crew Keith Notary, had a 2-3-1-2-2 string of finishes to edge Canadian David Sweeney and Pete Melvin of Westminster--the latter an '88 Olympian.
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SPORTS
April 11, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Cam Lewis of Boston moved into contention for an Olympic berth in the single-handed Finn class when he won the fifth race of the U.S. trials at Newport Beach. With winds of 5 to 9 knots, Kevin Hall of Ventura beat Lewis across the line but was disqualified for jumping the gun and failing to restart. In Tornado catamarans at Marina del Rey, Pete Melvin of Westminster, and crew Chris Steinfeld of Oyster Bay, N.Y.
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SPORTS
January 15, 1988 | RICH ROBERTS
Randy Smyth, the United States' foremost multihull sailor, has been helping Sail America design a catamaran to meet New Zealand's challenge for the America's Cup this year. "It will definitely be built," Smyth said Thursday. Smyth, of Huntington Beach, won a silver medal in the 1984 Olympics sailing a Tornado catamaran. No design plans have been revealed by Sail America, which will manage the defense for the San Diego Yacht Club.
SPORTS
April 6, 1992 | RICH ROBERTS
Fair winds of seven to nine knots along the Southern California coast carried Randy Smyth a step further in his comeback campaign Sunday when he won his second race in two tries in the U.S. Olympic sailing trials for Tornado catamarans at Marina del Rey. Smyth, who won a silver medal at Long Beach in 1984, skipped the 1988 Games while working with Dennis Conner's catamaran defense of the America's Cup against New Zealand.
SPORTS
July 7, 1988 | RICH ROBERTS, Times Staff Writer
All the Tornado catamaran sailors here for the Olympic trials miss Randy Smyth, the way the heavyweight boxers of the world would miss Mike Tyson. "I am disappointed," Gary Knapp insisted after finishing second to Pete Melvin of Long Beach in the first race Wednesday. "It's certainly in (the team's) best interests to have our best representative go from the country, and Randy would certainly be a key player.
SPORTS
April 11, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Cam Lewis of Boston moved into contention for an Olympic berth in the single-handed Finn class when he won the fifth race of the U.S. trials at Newport Beach. With winds of 5 to 9 knots, Kevin Hall of Ventura beat Lewis across the line but was disqualified for jumping the gun and failing to restart. In Tornado catamarans at Marina del Rey, Pete Melvin of Westminster, and crew Chris Steinfeld of Oyster Bay, N.Y.
SPORTS
May 10, 1989 | Special to The Times
Despite falling overboard and capsizing, Randy Smyth of Huntington Beach, with crewman Kevin Burnham, led the World 1000 1,000-mile race for small catamarans after the first of 12 legs 106 miles from Key Biscayne Wednesday. Smyth was in the lead when he fell off and grabbed the spinnaker, capsizing the boat. While Smyth and Burnham paddled to shore to right the boat, the Australian team of Bret Dryland and Rod Waterhouse passed them but then sailed 10 miles past this first checkpoint and wound up sixth for the day.
SPORTS
July 24, 1986 | From Associated Press
Randy Smyth of Huntington Beach and Jim Hill of San Francisco teamed up to open a narrow lead Wednesday after the first day of racing in the Pacific 1,000 catamaran race. Racing from Long Beach to Catalina Island, Smyth and Hill covered a 57-mile course in 4 hours 37 minutes to open a 2-minute advantage over their nearest competitor. Greg Richardson of Myrtle Beach, Calif., and Roy Seaman of Malibu were second, reaching the first of 11 checkpoints in 4:39. George Del Bianco of Madera, Calif.
SPORTS
April 10, 1989
Former America's Cup semifinalist Tom Blackaller upset Salem ProSail 40 champion Randy Smyth of Huntington Beach to win the $100,000 Carolina Cup at Wrightsville Beach, N.C. Pete Melvin of Seal Beach took the Hobie 21 class by placing first and fourth in the final two races Sunday. Blackaller, of Sausalito, Calif., went into the final two races tied with Smyth. Sailing in light winds of six to eight knots, Blackaller sailed his U.S. Video-Pecco catamaran to two third-place finishes to win the event with 11.50 points.
SPORTS
April 6, 1992 | RICH ROBERTS
Fair winds of seven to nine knots along the Southern California coast carried Randy Smyth a step further in his comeback campaign Sunday when he won his second race in two tries in the U.S. Olympic sailing trials for Tornado catamarans at Marina del Rey. Smyth, who won a silver medal at Long Beach in 1984, skipped the 1988 Games while working with Dennis Conner's catamaran defense of the America's Cup against New Zealand.
SPORTS
March 30, 1992 | RICH ROBERTS
Randy Smyth, a silver medalist in 1984, strengthened his comeback for the Barcelona Olympics by winning the Tornado catamaran class in the three-day Olympic Classes Regatta at Alamitos Bay Yacht Club ending Sunday. Smyth, with crew Keith Notary, had a 2-3-1-2-2 string of finishes to edge Canadian David Sweeney and Pete Melvin of Westminster--the latter an '88 Olympian.
SPORTS
August 11, 1990 | RICH ROBERTS
It was like old times when Randy Smyth blew back into town this week to claim the Alter Cup, one of the few catamaran sailing titles he hadn't won. The cup represents the United States Yacht Racing Union's national multihull championship, and Smyth, with crewman Glen Purcell, wrapped it up Friday at Long Beach, winning for the sixth time in nine races and allowing them to sit out the 10th. Ten regional qualifiers sailed new Prindle 18-2s. Winds were a fresh 15-18 knots most of the week.
SPORTS
September 18, 1989 | RICH ROBERTS, Times Staff Writer
Cam Lewis said he had the feeling all week that "somebody's looking over my shoulder," but Sunday the specter of Tom Blackaller must have been kicking him in the backside. "I can't fill Tom's sea boots, but Tom's a competitive guy," Lewis said. "I think he'd be proud of us for what we did." If it wasn't quite enough to prevent Randy Smyth of Huntington Beach from winning his second Salem ProSail championship for 40-foot catamarans, few could fault Lewis and his six-man crew for their effort.
SPORTS
June 5, 1989 | Rich Roberts
Randy Smyth maintains that, in sailing, it's harder to win a world championship than it is the Olympics, and last month America's top catamaran sailor won two other events that seemed like the toughest of all: a ProSail 40 event at Charlotte, N.C., and the World 1000 (miles) up the coast of the southeast United States. At Charlotte, he lost a crew member overboard in one of the 10 races and draped rival Tom Blackaller with his spinnaker in the last race before almost capsizing seconds prior to reaching the finish line.
NEWS
May 19, 1989 | JOHN O'DELL, Times Staff Writer
If they ran a jealousy sweepstakes among small-business owners, Randy and Terri Smyth would be likely candidates to win in the "people to envy" category. Their business not only enables them to support their avocation--it is a big part of it. The company, Sails by Smyth, is a small Huntington Beach firm specializing in custom sails for catamarans. The avocation is catamaran racing. Terri Smyth said she and her husband spend about 6 months of each year at home in Huntington Beach, tending to the business of sail making and marketing.
SPORTS
May 10, 1989 | Special to The Times
Despite falling overboard and capsizing, Randy Smyth of Huntington Beach, with crewman Kevin Burnham, led the World 1000 1,000-mile race for small catamarans after the first of 12 legs 106 miles from Key Biscayne Wednesday. Smyth was in the lead when he fell off and grabbed the spinnaker, capsizing the boat. While Smyth and Burnham paddled to shore to right the boat, the Australian team of Bret Dryland and Rod Waterhouse passed them but then sailed 10 miles past this first checkpoint and wound up sixth for the day.
SPORTS
June 14, 1986 | ALMON LOCKABEY
Hobie Alter Jr. of Capistrano Beach and Randy Smyth of Huntington Beach battled down to the wire in the final race of the Hobie-17 nationals Friday. The winner was Alter, finishing the final race less than a boat length ahead of Smyth but with the same score, 6.25 points, after six races in the finals. The outcome was decided on the basis of the throwout race for each skipper. Alter threw out a third place, Smyth a 36th place in a race from which he withdrew.
SPORTS
April 10, 1989
Former America's Cup semifinalist Tom Blackaller upset Salem ProSail 40 champion Randy Smyth of Huntington Beach to win the $100,000 Carolina Cup at Wrightsville Beach, N.C. Pete Melvin of Seal Beach took the Hobie 21 class by placing first and fourth in the final two races Sunday. Blackaller, of Sausalito, Calif., went into the final two races tied with Smyth. Sailing in light winds of six to eight knots, Blackaller sailed his U.S. Video-Pecco catamaran to two third-place finishes to win the event with 11.50 points.
SPORTS
October 13, 1988 | Rich Roberts
The man acknowledged as America's best catamaran sailor sailed in the America's Cup races instead of the Olympics last month. Randy Smyth was unable to do both, has no regrets about choosing the Cup races, but allows that both events might have seen the last of the 34-year-old sail maker from Huntington Beach. "It was a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity in the sense of the technology and to learn and be a part of it and contribute to a catamaran effort," he said of the Cup experience.
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