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Randy Steven Kraft

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 1989 | JERRY HICKS, Times Staff Writer
Attorneys for Randy Steven Kraft told the jury Wednesday that they had a right to be suspicious of Kraft's involvement in several of the 16 murders he is charged with committing. But they urged jurors not to confuse suspicion with proof beyond a reasonable doubt. "If you put up enough different charges, you could come up with a scenario that could convict a Pope," Kraft attorney James G. Merwin warned them. The defense has so far spent 1 1/2 days on closing arguments at Kraft's trial in Santa Ana, which is now in its ninth month.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2000 | RICHARD MAROSI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eleven years after an Orange County jury convicted Randy Kraft of murdering 16 people, the California Supreme Court on Thursday upheld his death sentence in what officials described as an important advance in the effort to execute the notorious serial killer. The justices unanimously rejected Kraft's claims that he received an unfair trial, saying he should die for the decadelong murder spree.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1988 | Staff Writer Jerry Hicks
Prosecutors in the Randy Steven Kraft murder trial say a paper with 61 entries, found in his car trunk when he was arrested May 14, 1983, is a death list--Kraft's own score card of how many young men he had killed dating back to late 1971. Kraft's attorneys deny it is a death list, and call it meaningless information that will only inflame his jury. Kraft himself, in a 1983 interview, called the list nothing more than references to friends of his and his roommate at the time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1995 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
County officials on Friday hailed the work of a diligent deputy coroner in identifying one of convicted serial killer Randy Kraft's anonymous victims, nearly 22 years after the murder. Kraft was suspected of kidnaping, killing and sexually mutilating more than 60 young men, many of whom were drugged before they were attacked.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1988
In regard to the Randy Steven Kraft complaints (July 15): It looks like Kraft's conditions aren't so bad. After all, he is alive. Oh yes, one more thing, about the last complaint of not being allowed hobbies; maybe this is for the best; his hobbies seem to be deadly. JAN AKEYSON San Clemente
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 1988 | Compiled by Times staff writer Laura Kurtzman
Randy Steven Kraft, charged with murdering 16 men, is on trial in Orange County Superior Court in what some legal experts say will be the biggest and costliest case in California history. LAST WEEK: The prosecution showed jurors a portion of Kraft's alleged death list. THE DEFENSE: 'We are prepared to stipulate that the handwriting in Exhibit 165 (the alleged death list) is in Mr. Kraft's handwriting. ' --C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1987
The biggest problem contributing to the paper chase that clutters the system with injustice is the defense attorneys ("Fear Stalks Death Row as the Inevitable Nears," Nov. 8). William J. Kopeny, one of the attorneys representing Randy Steven Kraft, feels that the first execution in the state will be hard on him as an attorney and that it will make him think that "we aren't doing nearly enough." I would imagine that it would be hard on him if his client is executed; there will be no more of the taxpayers' money being allocated to him for his client's defense.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1989
Jurors in the Randy Steven Kraft murder trial in Santa Ana completed their first full day of deliberations Wednesday and are scheduled to continue today. The 10 women and two men on the jury convicted Kraft three months ago of first-degree murder in the deaths of 16 young men in Orange County. After a two-month penalty hearing, they now must decide whether to return a verdict of death or life in prison without parole.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1989
Superior Court Judge Donald A. McCartin agreed Friday, over prosecution objections, to postpone sentencing for convicted serial killer Randy Steven Kraft to Nov. 29 at the request of defense lawyers. Kraft, whose jury returned a death verdict in August, had been scheduled for sentencing Oct. 27. But his lawyers told the court they simply were not ready with a variety of motions they expect to present, primarily in an attempt to win Kraft a new trial. Deputy Dist. Atty. Bryan F.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1993 | From Associated Press
Convicted serial killer Randy Kraft, on Death Row for the sexual torture murders of 16 men, claims in a $60-million libel lawsuit that a book about his grisly crime spree defames his good name. Superior Court Judge Richard Montes, who is weighing whether to dismiss the suit, may hear arguments today over the telephone from Kraft, who is in San Quentin State Prison.
NEWS
October 16, 1990 | JOHN NEEDHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Randy Steven Kraft, the "score-card killer" who was convicted in Santa Ana last year of murdering 16 men, had someone waiting for him when he reached Death Row at San Quentin State Prison. The acolyte was William Bonin, a fellow serial killer who anticipated Kraft's arrival last fall "like the student awaiting his master," according to one inmate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1989
In "If Prop. 13 Goes, We've Got to Have a Plan" (Op-Ed Page, Dec. 3), Assemblyman Johan Klehs (D-San Leandro) details the threat that three impending court challenges may result in Prop. 13 being declared in violation of the 14th Amendment to the Constitution, and calls for a careful evaluation of the legal criticisms involved. Such a careful evaluation would show that these equal protection arguments rest on faulty economic analysis, that, once corrected, would destroy their argument.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1989 | JERRY HICKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Serial killer Randy Steven Kraft's lawyers reportedly spent $5.5 million on investigators and other expenses during his six-year defense, but the attorneys Saturday blamed the high costs on prosecutors for including so many murders in his case. "If you are dealing with a single murder, yes, that's a high figure," said Kraft attorney James G. Merwin. "But we had to investigate 37 murders. We had to do things you wouldn't have to do in the average homicide trial." The $5.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1989
A solemn Randy Steven Kraft, convicted of killing 16 young men in Orange County, was delivered Thursday by Orange County sheriff's deputies to Death Row at San Quentin state prison. A day after being sentenced to die in the gas chamber, Kraft was flown from Orange County to the Northern California facility in a private aircraft owned by a reserve Sheriff's Department aero-squadron member. During the hourlong flight, Kraft was "quiet and subdued," Orange County Sheriff's Lt. Richard Olson said.
NEWS
November 30, 1989 | JERRY HICKS
Randy Steven Kraft has been sentenced to death, but that hasn't changed Orange County Superior Court Judge Luis A. Cardenas' mind about not releasing the defense costs in the case. Cardenas said Wednesday that until he hears to the contrary from an appellate court, he is not willing to unseal details of the six-plus years of defense spending on the Kraft case until all of Kraft's appeals are exhausted.
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