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Randy Terry

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NEWS
March 24, 1989 | LYNN SMITH, Times Staff Writer
Randall Terry, holding an Operation Rescue psalm book and murmuring "Holy Jesus," was carried limp to a waiting police van Thursday as those he calls his enemies happily chanted, "Justice! Justice! Justice!" Despite his protests that "25 million dead kids" and not his own image should concern his followers and detractors, the 29-year-old radical anti-abortionist occupied center stage at a Cypress clinic as he brought the movement's lawless fringe to Southern California.
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NEWS
August 5, 1992 | Associated Press
Federal prosecutors on Tuesday refused U.S. District Judge Robert Ward's request to prosecute the founder of Operation Rescue on criminal contempt charges, citing the Bush Administration's support for the anti-abortion group. Randall Terry faces arraignment today on charges he violated a civil injunction barring him from presenting an aborted fetus to presidential candidate Bill Clinton during the Democratic National Convention last month.
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NEWS
January 31, 1990 | From Associated Press
Anti-abortion activist Randy Terry, who spent more than three months in jail rather than pay what he said was an unjust fine for trespassing, was released Tuesday from a work camp after the money was paid. Terry, founder of the anti-abortion group Operation Rescue, was released from Fulton County's Alpharetta Institution after a representative paid his fine of $500 plus a $50 assessment, jail and court officials said.
NEWS
April 27, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Operation Rescue took a day off from demonstrating to regroup after a week of unsuccessful efforts to halt abortions at women's clinics. Founder Randall Terry addressed more than 500 people at the Evangel Assembly of God Church in suburban Amherst on the sixth day of the group's Buffalo-area campaign. He urged continued protest actions, which have been thwarted by police and counterdemonstrators. Nearby, about 100 abortion rights activists chanted: "Randall Terry, go home!"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1989
While I was raised a Christian and would probably not personally have an abortion, I am opposed to the tactics of the anti-abortionists. I believe that if I were to have an abortion, only I should have the right to make that choice--not the church, not another human being, and certainly not the government. I urge all intelligent people to join us in preventing the Jim Jones' wannabe, Randy Terry, from dictating what we can and can't do with our bodies. Simply because a person says God told him to do something, does not make it so. Just like Jim Jones, Charles Manson, and numerous psychotics, Terry is determined to kill innocent people by tolerating bombings of abortion clinics in the name of pro-life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1990
The founder of the militant anti-abortion group Operation Rescue and two of his deputies pleaded no contest Monday to misdemeanor charges stemming from a massive illegal blockade of a woman's clinic near downtown Los Angeles in 1989. Randall Terry, 31, of Binghamton, N.Y., who founded the group, and Michael McMonagle, 37, of Philadelphia, pleaded no contest to a single misdemeanor count of blocking access to the clinic.
NEWS
August 19, 1991 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush will not interrupt his August vacation to meet with two leaders of Operation Rescue, the militant group that has been trying for the last month to block the entrances to abortion clinics in Wichita, Kan., he said Sunday. "I'm trying to get a vacation here," the President said. The two leaders, Randall Terry, founder of the group, and the Rev. Patrick J.
NEWS
September 14, 1989 | CHARISSE JONES and CAROL McGRAW, Times Staff Writers
Anti-abortion activist Randall Terry and four followers were acquitted Wednesday of two dozen charges stemming from an Easter weekend blockade of a Los Angeles women's clinic. The 30-year-old founder of Operation Rescue called the decision a "vindication" of his anti-abortion crusade. "This was a critical trial for us," Terry said in a telephone interview from his home in New York. "I think that being acquitted by a jury of our peers will be a tremendous boost to the pro-life community.
NEWS
February 1, 1990 | JOHN KENDALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anti-abortion militant Randall Terry said Wednesday that Operation Rescue is closing its national headquarters because of debt, but he assured a press conference in Washington that 125 local affiliates will continue their efforts to close abortion clinics across the country.
NEWS
March 28, 1989 | ERIC MALNIC and TRACY WILKINSON, Times Staff Writers
More than 300 jailed Operation Rescue demonstrators jammed Los Angeles arraignment courts Monday, withholding their names for hours in their determination to go on trial to further publicize their contention that abortion is murder. The arraignment process moved with excruciating slowness--just as the arrestees intended. By late Monday night, only 17 of them had been released, and it looked as though a great number would spend another night in jail.
NEWS
August 19, 1991 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush will not interrupt his August vacation to meet with two leaders of Operation Rescue, the militant group that has been trying for the last month to block the entrances to abortion clinics in Wichita, Kan., he said Sunday. "I'm trying to get a vacation here," the President said. The two leaders, Randall Terry, founder of the group, and the Rev. Patrick J.
NEWS
November 18, 1990 | From Associated Press
Several hundred protesters were arrested Saturday in a second straight day of anti-abortion demonstrations outside abortion clinics. Randall Terry, the head of Operation Rescue, was among those detained and loaded into two police buses outside a clinic in downtown Washington, witnesses said. Police had no immediate comment on the number of people taken into custody, but a local television station, WRC, said about 300 were arrested.
NEWS
September 2, 1990 | MARK PLATTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A national anti-abortion group affiliated with Operation Rescue has targeted 17 Southern California judges and nine others statewide for picketing, rallies, protest letters and telephone calls in what they say is the first organized effort to pressure jurists who have ruled against abortion protesters. The Washington, D.C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 1990 | WENDY PAULSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his first public appearance since serving a four-month jail sentence in Atlanta for charges related to an anti-abortion demonstration, Operation Rescue founder Randall Terry implored supporters Thursday to expand their battle to the courts. Terry said his organization would start giving out work and home phone numbers of judges and district attorneys who are involved in abortion issues and would begin picketing their homes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1990
The founder of the militant anti-abortion group Operation Rescue and two of his deputies pleaded no contest Monday to misdemeanor charges stemming from a massive illegal blockade of a woman's clinic near downtown Los Angeles in 1989. Randall Terry, 31, of Binghamton, N.Y., who founded the group, and Michael McMonagle, 37, of Philadelphia, pleaded no contest to a single misdemeanor count of blocking access to the clinic.
NEWS
February 1, 1990 | JOHN KENDALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anti-abortion militant Randall Terry said Wednesday that Operation Rescue is closing its national headquarters because of debt, but he assured a press conference in Washington that 125 local affiliates will continue their efforts to close abortion clinics across the country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1990 | JOHN KENDALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anti-abortion militant Randall Terry said Wednesday that Operation Rescue is shutting its national headquarters because of debt, but he told a press conference in Washington that 125 local affiliates will continue their efforts to close abortion clinics. Terry, a born-again Christian and former car salesman who founded Operation Rescue in 1988, stopped in the nation's capital on his way home to Rochester, N.Y., after release from a Georgia prison.
NEWS
January 31, 1990 | From Associated Press
Anti-abortion activist Randy Terry, who spent more than three months in jail rather than pay what he said was an unjust fine for trespassing, was released Tuesday from a work camp after the money was paid. Terry, founder of the anti-abortion group Operation Rescue, was released from Fulton County's Alpharetta Institution after a representative paid his fine of $500 plus a $50 assessment, jail and court officials said.
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