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Randy Weaver

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1995
Re "Both Sides Still Wrestling With Horrors of Ruby Ridge," Aug. 20: Randy Weaver decides not to show up for court and levels a threat to any would-be pursuer to stay off of his mountain. He and his family are heavily armed. Any idiot could tell you that if you don't show up for court they are going to come get you. Weaver most likely orchestrated his Armageddon- confronting plan around this. Guess who shows up? The FBI, the marshals--who cares! How does Weaver respond? He sends his wife and his 14-year-old son out to get killed.
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NEWS
June 6, 2001 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
An FBI sharpshooter can be prosecuted by the state of Idaho for the killing of white separatist Randy Weaver's wife during the 1992 siege at Ruby Ridge, a sharply divided federal appeals court in San Francisco ruled Tuesday. The 6-5 decision by the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals reversed two earlier rulings and held that sharpshooter Lon T. Horiuchi's status as a federal agent did not protect him from prosecution because he has not demonstrated that his actions were objectively reasonable.
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NEWS
September 13, 1995 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The FBI sniper who killed the wife of a white separatist in the siege at Ruby Ridge, Ida., in 1992 invoked his Fifth Amendment privilege Tuesday and refused to describe to a Senate subcommittee the circumstances of the crucial event. Sniper Lon Horiuchi took the Fifth Amendment after the Senate Judiciary subcommittee on terrorism refused to give him limited immunity from prosecution. Immunity for Horiuchi could have complicated criminal inquiries being conducted by the Boundary County, Ida.
NEWS
September 30, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
A federal appeals court agreed to rehear arguments on whether the FBI sharpshooter who killed Randy Weaver's wife during the 1992 standoff at Ruby Ridge, Idaho, can be prosecuted on manslaughter charges. In June, a three-judge panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that Idaho prosecutors could not hold Lon T. Horiuchi responsible for actions taken as a federal lawman. On a request from prosecutors, however, the 11-member court will rehear the case at an undetermined time.
NEWS
March 31, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The FBI is considering whether to accept an offer from Randy Weaver, the man whose wife they killed four years ago in a bloody standoff near Ruby Ridge, Idaho, to mediate an end to the nearly week-old siege with antigovernment "freemen" holed up on a remote ranch near Jordan, officials said. Meanwhile, Freeman member Richard E. Clark turned himself in to authorities at a residence near Grass Range in central Montana.
NEWS
September 7, 1995 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
White separatist Randy Weaver, in emotion-charged testimony before a Senate subcommittee, admitted Wednesday that he had made mistakes but demanded that federal agents be held accountable for their actions during the 1992 confrontation at Ruby Ridge, Ida., that claimed the lives of Weaver's wife, his 14-year old son and a deputy U.S. marshal.
NEWS
August 28, 1992 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the dark and brooding mountains covering the long panhandle of northern Idaho, Randy Weaver--survivalist, racist and fugitive from the law--chose his fortress well. For decades, a variety of radicals, survivalists, criminals, white supremacists and religious zealots on the furthest fringe of society have sought refuge in the isolated cabins deep in the Douglas fir forests.
NEWS
September 16, 1995 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two deputy U.S. marshals who survived the 1992 shootout at Ruby Ridge, Ida., testified Friday that they believe white separatist Randy Weaver--and not one of the marshals--accidentally shot and killed his own son. Under questioning by members of the Senate Judiciary subcommittee on terrorism, Larry T. Cooper denied that he had fired the fatal bullet that went through 14-year-old Sammy Weaver's back. Fellow Deputy Marshal Arthur D.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 2000
Re "Elian Isn't the Only Child Traumatized," Commentary, May 5: In her excellent piece on police brutality and the feigned outrage by Washington's establishment, Arianna Huffington forgot to mention the Branch Davidians and Randy Weaver, episodes in which children were not simply traumatized--they were killed. Randy Weaver's son was shot in cold blood. His wife was also murdered in front of their remaining children. The Branch Davidian children were burned alive with their parents. Elian Gonzalez should consider himself lucky.
NEWS
August 23, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
A friend of white separatist Randy Weaver posted $10,000 cash bond and was released from jail in Bonners Ferry to await his murder trial in the 1992 standoff at Ruby Ridge. Family members of Kevin Harris put up the money. Harris, 29, was charged with first-degree murder in the killing of an FBI agent and aggravated assault during an August 1992 standoff with authorities at Weaver's rural Idaho cabin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 2000
Re "Elian Isn't the Only Child Traumatized," Commentary, May 5: In her excellent piece on police brutality and the feigned outrage by Washington's establishment, Arianna Huffington forgot to mention the Branch Davidians and Randy Weaver, episodes in which children were not simply traumatized--they were killed. Randy Weaver's son was shot in cold blood. His wife was also murdered in front of their remaining children. The Branch Davidian children were burned alive with their parents. Elian Gonzalez should consider himself lucky.
NEWS
March 14, 1998 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Top law enforcement officials stepped up in defense of FBI sharpshooter Lon Horiuchi, arguing Friday that criminal manslaughter charges he faces in connection with the siege at Ruby Ridge threaten to undermine federal law enforcement efforts across the country. "It is impossible to imagine a more chilling circumstance than the one presented by the instant effort to prosecute," a coalition of former U.S. attorneys general, joining the Department of Justice and the International Assn.
NEWS
February 10, 1998 | Associated Press
The federal government on Monday sought the dismissal of a state involuntary manslaughter charge against the FBI sharpshooter who killed Randy Weaver's wife in a shootout at Ruby Ridge six years ago. The Justice Department petition filed in federal court argued that Lon Horiuchi was protected by the supremacy clause of the U.S. Constitution and should not be subject to state prosecution for actions in the line of duty.
NEWS
November 1, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The FBI sharpshooter who killed Vicki Weaver during a standoff at a mountain cabin in Ruby Ridge, Idaho, five years ago sought to have the state's involuntary manslaughter case against him moved to federal court. The Justice Department supported Lon Horiuchi's bid in a separate filing to the U.S. District Court in Idaho. The 13-year FBI veteran is accused of criminal negligence for firing into the cabin, killing Weaver as she stood behind the door in August 1992.
NEWS
October 29, 1997 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Atty. Gen. Janet Reno is considering whether to take the side of the FBI sharpshooter accused of involuntary manslaughter in the 1992 clash between federal agents and anti-government separatists in Ruby Ridge, Ida.
NEWS
August 23, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
A friend of white separatist Randy Weaver posted $10,000 cash bond and was released from jail in Bonners Ferry to await his murder trial in the 1992 standoff at Ruby Ridge. Family members of Kevin Harris put up the money. Harris, 29, was charged with first-degree murder in the killing of an FBI agent and aggravated assault during an August 1992 standoff with authorities at Weaver's rural Idaho cabin.
NEWS
September 30, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
A federal appeals court agreed to rehear arguments on whether the FBI sharpshooter who killed Randy Weaver's wife during the 1992 standoff at Ruby Ridge, Idaho, can be prosecuted on manslaughter charges. In June, a three-judge panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that Idaho prosecutors could not hold Lon T. Horiuchi responsible for actions taken as a federal lawman. On a request from prosecutors, however, the 11-member court will rehear the case at an undetermined time.
NEWS
February 10, 1998 | Associated Press
The federal government on Monday sought the dismissal of a state involuntary manslaughter charge against the FBI sharpshooter who killed Randy Weaver's wife in a shootout at Ruby Ridge six years ago. The Justice Department petition filed in federal court argued that Lon Horiuchi was protected by the supremacy clause of the U.S. Constitution and should not be subject to state prosecution for actions in the line of duty.
NEWS
May 19, 1996 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's almost impossible not to be aware of the anti-government militia movement in the United States. The "freemen" standoff in Montana and the Oklahoma City bombing trial have been in newspaper and TV headlines for months. And now one of the government's most controversial encounters with separatists is the subject of the four-hour CBS drama "Ruby Ridge: An American Tragedy."
NEWS
April 30, 1996 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal authorities have repeatedly rejected recommendations from former Army Col. James "Bo" Gritz to end the standoff with anti-government "freemen" here, a posture that has prolonged the six-week-old confrontation, former militant Randy Weaver said Monday.
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