Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRange War
IN THE NEWS

Range War

FEATURED ARTICLES
OPINION
April 15, 2014
Re "BLM relents after standoff," April 13 Relenting to the demands of the armed supporters of Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy, who has his cattle graze on public land but refuses to pay the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, sends a dangerous message: that disputes with the federal government are best resolved with threats of violence. This outcome will only inspire more radicals to take arms against the U.S. government. This is a serious setback for civil discourse and undermines the rule of law that all citizens need for safety and stability.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 23, 2014 | Times Editorial Board
Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy is being portrayed by some as a man of principle, an iconoclast who should be admired for his willingness to stand up to the federal government. But in fact he's a petty scofflaw who seems to think that he has the right to pick and choose which rules must be obeyed. Bundy is the cattleman who grazes his herd on federal land operated by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, but unlike more than 15,000 other ranchers, he refuses to pay the associated grazing fees.
Advertisement
NATIONAL
April 7, 2014 | By John M. Glionna
LAS VEGAS - Wielding signs and slogans, several hundred demonstrators rallied Monday to support beleaguered cattle rancher Cliven Bundy and his family in a turf battle against the federal government. They had responded to an alert promising a new skirmish: “Range War begins at the Bundy ranch at 9:30 a.m. We're going to get the job done!” Bundy is battling with federal officials over his cattle's grazing on 150 square miles of scrub desert overseen by the Bureau of Land Management.
OPINION
April 15, 2014
Re "BLM relents after standoff," April 13 Relenting to the demands of the armed supporters of Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy, who has his cattle graze on public land but refuses to pay the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, sends a dangerous message: that disputes with the federal government are best resolved with threats of violence. This outcome will only inspire more radicals to take arms against the U.S. government. This is a serious setback for civil discourse and undermines the rule of law that all citizens need for safety and stability.
NATIONAL
March 27, 2014 | By John M. Glionna
LAS VEGAS -- From the cab of his old pickup, Cliven Bundy watched the trucks congregate on the horizon near his ranch some 80 miles north of here. His ongoing range war with the federal government, Bundy said, has heated up yet again. Officials say Bundy is illegally running cattle in the 600,000-acre Gold Butte area, a habitat of the protected desert tortoise. Last year, a U.S. District Court judge ruled that if the 68-year-old veteran rancher did not remove his cattle, they could be seized by the Bureau of Land Management.
NATIONAL
April 7, 2014 | By John M. Glionna
LAS VEGAS - Wielding signs and slogans, several hundred demonstrators rallied Monday to support beleaguered Nevada cattle rancher Cliven Bundy after authorities began to seize his cattle from federal land. Protesters had responded to an alert that promised: "Range war begins at the Bundy ranch at 9:30 a.m. We're going to get the job done!" Federal officials say Bundy is illegally running cattle in the 600,000-acre Gold Butte area, habitat of the federally protected desert tortoise.
OPINION
April 23, 2014 | Times Editorial Board
Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy is being portrayed by some as a man of principle, an iconoclast who should be admired for his willingness to stand up to the federal government. But in fact he's a petty scofflaw who seems to think that he has the right to pick and choose which rules must be obeyed. Bundy is the cattleman who grazes his herd on federal land operated by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, but unlike more than 15,000 other ranchers, he refuses to pay the associated grazing fees.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1987 | STEVE HOCHMAN
When former local hard-core punk paragon Lee Ving emerged recently leading a country band called Range War, some people naturally assumed it was just an act. After all, the Fear founder has developed a career in movies and television over the last few years with roles in "Flashdance" and the sitcom "Who's the Boss?" So why shouldn't he play a country singer?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2001 | Cecilia Rasmussen
The great feud of the Castaic Hills was the most enduring range war in Southern California, so deadly that even a peacemaker appointed by Theodore Roosevelt--the president who won the Nobel Peace Prize--couldn't settle it. It was triggered by a land dispute, and it didn't end until it had claimed as many as 21 lives. Graves of its possible victims were unearthed as recently as three years ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1992 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The farmer and the cowman should be friends, wrote Oscar Hammerstein II. But they're far from it in Robert Hummer's "Peace in the Valley" at the Cast Theatre in Hollywood. "Peace" dramatizes an Old West range war--not one of the more familiar stage subjects. Movies have the edge in this area, as they can show us the wide expanses of the range itself. Still, Hummer can depict a home on the range--where seldom is heard an encouraging word. This particular home is in the thick of the fray.
NATIONAL
April 7, 2014 | By John M. Glionna
LAS VEGAS - Wielding signs and slogans, several hundred demonstrators rallied Monday to support beleaguered cattle rancher Cliven Bundy and his family in a turf battle against the federal government. They had responded to an alert promising a new skirmish: “Range War begins at the Bundy ranch at 9:30 a.m. We're going to get the job done!” Bundy is battling with federal officials over his cattle's grazing on 150 square miles of scrub desert overseen by the Bureau of Land Management.
NATIONAL
April 7, 2014 | By John M. Glionna
LAS VEGAS - Wielding signs and slogans, several hundred demonstrators rallied Monday to support beleaguered Nevada cattle rancher Cliven Bundy after authorities began to seize his cattle from federal land. Protesters had responded to an alert that promised: "Range war begins at the Bundy ranch at 9:30 a.m. We're going to get the job done!" Federal officials say Bundy is illegally running cattle in the 600,000-acre Gold Butte area, habitat of the federally protected desert tortoise.
NATIONAL
March 27, 2014 | By John M. Glionna
LAS VEGAS -- From the cab of his old pickup, Cliven Bundy watched the trucks congregate on the horizon near his ranch some 80 miles north of here. His ongoing range war with the federal government, Bundy said, has heated up yet again. Officials say Bundy is illegally running cattle in the 600,000-acre Gold Butte area, a habitat of the protected desert tortoise. Last year, a U.S. District Court judge ruled that if the 68-year-old veteran rancher did not remove his cattle, they could be seized by the Bureau of Land Management.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2004 | Bob Pool, Times Staff Writer
Accusations are flying along with golf balls at the Los Angeles City College driving range, whose construction has become the focus of a state inquiry. Court papers and interviews paint a picture of a project jinxed from the start. It was built from plans that failed to show a child-care center that was located in the midst of the range site.
MAGAZINE
February 2, 2003 | Jim Robbins
Nothing is simple about mineral rights in Wyoming. While some ranchers own the rights to the treasure beneath their feet, in most cases they do not. The Stock Raising Homestead Act of 1916 granted land to ranchers, but in most cases kept the mineral rights in federal hands. In other cases, those rights are owned by the state, or even other private owners.
NATIONAL
August 19, 2002 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The drive to Telluride is a journey through beauty. The long snaking road climbs through a crack in the angular San Juan Mountains and finally issues out to the valley floor, a 3-mile-long swath of green where cattle graze amid wildflowers. This is the frontyard to Telluride, a storied mining settlement where ascending tiers of violet-and green-painted Victorian homes cling precariously to the mountainside and the entire town backs into a box canyon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1989 | STEVE PADILLA, Times Staff Writer
The "Jenkins-Chormicle Affair" is all but forgotten these days, but, in its time, the great range war of Castaic was as bitter and savage as the legendary Hatfield-McCoy feud. The killing started in 1890 when a crusty rancher known as "Old Man" Chormicle pierced one man's heart and another's liver with a few well-placed rifle blasts. By some accounts, the ensuing feud took 22 lives by the time that the last gunshots rang through the Castaic hills 26 years later.
NEWS
April 2, 1997 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Columns of smoke spiraling over the land in this region of arid ranches and stark volcanic mountains were a nagging signal to cattlemen that Wayne Shifflett was at it again. As manager of the embattled Buenos Aires National Wildlife Refuge, Shifflett has spent a decade ripping out miles of fences and dozens of corrals, and setting fire to thousands of acres of shimmering grasslands that once provided excellent pasture for cattle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2001 | Cecilia Rasmussen
The great feud of the Castaic Hills was the most enduring range war in Southern California, so deadly that even a peacemaker appointed by Theodore Roosevelt--the president who won the Nobel Peace Prize--couldn't settle it. It was triggered by a land dispute, and it didn't end until it had claimed as many as 21 lives. Graves of its possible victims were unearthed as recently as three years ago.
NEWS
December 26, 2000 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument sprawls over 1.9 million acres, its slick rock canyons and spectacular red and white benches and cliffs rising nearly a mile from the desert floor. This vast range, like the rugged people who attempt to make their living off of it, can be stubborn, unyielding and difficult to manage. In the midst of a drought, the federal government has restricted cattle grazing here, saying the region's fragile land needs time to heal.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|