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NEWS
December 28, 2010 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
Rep. Charles B. Rangel, whose 40 years in the House have come under a cloud because of an ethics scandal, announced Tuesday he has established a new defense fund to help pay off past legal expenses and to deal with pending and new complaints. Rangel (D-N.Y.) was censured by the House earlier this month for financial and fundraising misconduct and had to stand on the chamber’s floor to listen to Speaker Nancy Pelosi read the censure resolution, which passed 333-79. The new fund, called the Charles B. Rangel Legal Expense Trust, was approved by the House ethics committee, Rangel announced in a prepared statement.
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NEWS
June 26, 2012 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON -- Voters are heading to the polls for primary contests in key congressional races that could determine the fate of longtime incumbents -- and help define the new Congress that emerges after elections this fall. Veteran Republican Sen. Orrin Hatch is working to fend off a "tea party" challenge Tuesday in Utah, where conservative opponents have poured in money and resources in hopes of a repeat of their 2010 victory in the Beehive State that helped fuel the tea party victories nationwide that cycle.
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NATIONAL
July 30, 2010 | By James Oliphant, Tribune Washington Bureau
A House panel on Thursday accused New York Rep. Charles B. Rangel of 13 ethics violations, placing his storied 40-year political career in jeopardy and guaranteeing Democrats an election-year headache. The allegations were unveiled in a meeting that set the stage for a rare, full-blown trial that could take place as soon as September. Rangel, a Democrat from Harlem, did not attend the meeting and has maintained he will be exonerated. Until the moment House Ethics Committee members met Thursday afternoon, talk filtered through congressional corridors that Rangel's attorneys had struck an agreement to avoid the hearing.
NEWS
June 26, 2012 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON - Two congressional veterans defeated career-threatening primary challenges Tuesday night as voters weighed in on races that could help define the next Congress. Sen. Orrin G. Hatch of Utah overcame a tea party challenge to win the Republican nomination, while in New York, veteran Democratic Rep. Charles B. Rangel fended off a bevy of challengers for the right to seek a 22nd term. Neither race is considered an opportunity for the opposing party this fall. Utah is expected to elect a Republican senator in November, and New York's 13th Congressional District will almost certainly stay in the Democratic column.
NATIONAL
September 19, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
The House rejected a Republican-led bid to force Rep. Charles B. Rangel (D-N.Y.) to give up his chairmanship of the tax-writing Ways and Means Committee while the ethics committee reviews his financial and tax records. The proposal failed, 226-176. Issues include Rangel's failure to report $75,000 in rental income and his use of a rent-controlled apartment as a campaign office. Rangel, 78, denies intentional wrongdoing.
NEWS
November 17, 2010 | By Michael A. Memoli and Matea Gold, Tribune Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON ? A congressional panel has found New York Rep. Charles Rangel guilty of 11 violations of House ethics rules and now will consider sanctions of the Democrat that could range from formal reprimand to expulsion from Congress. Rangel had been charged with 13 rules violations, including failing to declare rental income from a Dominican villa, improper solicitation of donations on congressional letterhead and misuse of a rent-controlled apartment as a campaign office. Two of the violations were combined.
NATIONAL
July 23, 2010 | By Lisa Mascaro and Michael A. Memoli, Tribune Washington Bureau
Democratic Rep. Charles B. Rangel, once among the most powerful members of Congress, will face a hearing on charges of violating House ethics rules after a panel of his peers formally accused him of wrongdoing Thursday. For two years, House ethics investigators pored over records of the New York congressman's travel and record-keeping in response to complaints about corporate-paid trips, the use of several rent-stabilized apartments and other allegations. Rangel, 80, could face reprimand, censure or expulsion if the House Ethics Committee determines he violated rules.
NATIONAL
November 17, 2010 | By James Oliphant and Michael A. Memoli, Tribune Washington Bureau
A congressional panel Tuesday found Rep. Charles B. Rangel of New York guilty of violating 11 House ethics rules, but the Harlem Democrat is likely to escape the most serious punishment for his actions ? expulsion from the House. Instead, it's expected that the once-powerful chairman of the Ways and Means Committee will be reprimanded or censured by his colleagues for ethics transgressions that include his failure to declare rental income from a Dominican villa, improper solicitation of donations on congressional letterhead and misuse of a rent-controlled apartment as a campaign office.
NATIONAL
October 8, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Rep. Charles B. Rangel's Democratic colleagues blocked a move to strip him of his committee chairmanship amid numerous allegations that he violated congressional ethics rules. A Republican-sponsored resolution said that Rangel (D-N.Y.) was unfit to lead the House Ways and Means Committee, which writes tax laws, while he is under investigation by the ethics committee. But Democrats prevented debate on the resolution and, on a 246-153 vote, instead sent it to the ethics committee. Six Republicans voted with the Democrats, while two members of Rangel's party sided with the Republicans.
NEWS
December 31, 1987 | Associated Press
The chairman and ranking Republican member of the House narcotics committee criticized Education Secretary William J. Bennett today for not emphasizing the drug abuse issue in his proposal for a model high school curriculum. Rep. Charles B. Rangel (D-N.Y.), the chairman, said in a statement that Bennett "buried the drug issue, which students themselves say is the biggest problem facing young people today."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 2011 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Dr. Leo Rangell, a leading psychoanalyst who argued forcefully that theoretical fads and factions threatened to erode consumer confidence in the field founded by Sigmund Freud more than 100 years ago, died Saturday at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center. He was 97. The cause was complications from surgery, said his daughter Judith Alley. A clinical professor of psychiatry at UCLA and UC San Francisco, Rangell wrote more than 450 published papers as well as several books, including "The Mind of Watergate" (1980)
NEWS
December 28, 2010 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
Rep. Charles B. Rangel, whose 40 years in the House have come under a cloud because of an ethics scandal, announced Tuesday he has established a new defense fund to help pay off past legal expenses and to deal with pending and new complaints. Rangel (D-N.Y.) was censured by the House earlier this month for financial and fundraising misconduct and had to stand on the chamber’s floor to listen to Speaker Nancy Pelosi read the censure resolution, which passed 333-79. The new fund, called the Charles B. Rangel Legal Expense Trust, was approved by the House ethics committee, Rangel announced in a prepared statement.
OPINION
December 6, 2010
Be more like Pete Wilson Re "State budget reality check," Column, Dec. 2 George Skelton blames California's economic crisis on a "devastating recession, ? the way Prop. 13 was implemented" under then-Gov. Jerry Brown and the "fiscal irresponsibility" of Gov. Gray Davis, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and the Legislature. I couldn't help but notice that Davis' immediate predecessor, Gov. Pete Wilson, doesn't appear on Skelton's list. Maybe that's because ? despite the recession of the early 1990s, Proposition 13 and the profligacy of our Legislature ?
NATIONAL
December 3, 2010 | By Richard Simon, Los Angeles Times
After high political drama and an emotional debate, the House of Representatives censured Rep. Charles B. Rangel (D-N.Y.) on Thursday for ethical misconduct, meting out its first such punishment in nearly 30 years. As the often raucous body came to a standstill, the 80-year-old former chairman of the powerful House Ways and Means Committee stood in the well of the chamber, hands clasped in front of him, while Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D- San Francisco) somberly read the censure resolution: "Resolved, that Rep. Charles B. Rangel of New York be censured; the representative will present himself in the well of the House for the pronouncement of censure ?
NATIONAL
November 19, 2010 | By James Oliphant, Tribune Washington Bureau
The bipartisan House Ethics Committee recommended Thursday that embattled New York Democrat Charles B. Rangel be censured by the full House of Representatives for ethics violations, the stiffest penalty a member can face short of expulsion. The House will probably take up the matter after Thanksgiving. Rangel would be the first congressman censured in almost 30 years. The Harlem representative had sought a lighter sanction. Before the vote, he asked the committee for leniency, pointing to his 40 years of service on Capitol Hill and saying "there was not even the suggestion of corruption" in the allegations against him. Unlike the defiant posture Rangel assumed this week, the 80-year-old former chairman of the Ways and Means Committee seemed resigned, even dispirited.
NATIONAL
November 17, 2010 | By James Oliphant and Michael A. Memoli, Tribune Washington Bureau
A congressional panel Tuesday found Rep. Charles B. Rangel of New York guilty of violating 11 House ethics rules, but the Harlem Democrat is likely to escape the most serious punishment for his actions ? expulsion from the House. Instead, it's expected that the once-powerful chairman of the Ways and Means Committee will be reprimanded or censured by his colleagues for ethics transgressions that include his failure to declare rental income from a Dominican villa, improper solicitation of donations on congressional letterhead and misuse of a rent-controlled apartment as a campaign office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1995
Your editorial, "Free Speech That's Costing Congress a Lot" (May 14), indicates that your hypocrisy is apparently unlimited. The pattern is clear. No statement by any Democratic member of Congress, no matter how vile, intemperate or unfounded, deserves even mild scolding by The Times. When Rep. Charles B. Rangel (D-N.Y.) compared the Speaker to "a Hitler," The Times was silent. When Rangel said that conservatives who wanted to cut spending were equivalent to the Ku Klux Klan, you said nothing.
OPINION
January 18, 2003
In his Jan. 13 commentary, "Talk of a Draft Is Nothing but Hot Air," former secretary of the Army Louis Caldera argues that the all-volunteer Army is more militarily effective than a conscription Army and that the 1960s draft produced just the kind of Army that Rep. Charles B. Rangel (D-N.Y.) doesn't want, one disproportionately manned by the poor and lower middle class. No one would argue with these points. However, Rangel's proposal is about the justification for war, not military efficiency or economic equity.
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