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Rangoon

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NEWS
June 18, 1995 | DENIS D. GRAY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
With hammers and crowbars they're knocking down old, atmospheric Rangoon, one of Asia's last reminders of the past, to make way for high-rise hotels and shopping centers. The 20th Century has finally caught up with Rangoon, where high-rise once meant the soaring spires of Buddhist pagodas, and tree-lined avenues were flanked by probably the largest collection of British colonial buildings in the world. Now, big chunks of the uniform urbanscape are being ripped out of the heart of Rangoon--now officially named Yangon--and the skyline has been pierced by several buildings approaching 20 stories.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1995 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Director John Boorman has a strong personal connection to Myanmar, starting with his father's presence there during World War I, when this isolated Asian country was still known as Burma. Concerned about the current military regime's stifling of political life, he in part made "Beyond Rangoon" to expose that brutal situation to the kind of international audience motion pictures can ensure. If "Beyond Rangoon's" intentions are laudable, the film itself is not.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 1995
Re "Exiting the Burma Road," editorial, Feb. 14: You failed to mention the two American giants, Unocal and Texaco which, with Total of France, recently signed a $400 million deal with the military thugs in Rangoon to build a pipeline through the Mon tribal homeland to transport natural gas from Burma to Thailand. What is so repulsive is the use of slaves to build roads, railroads and other backbreaking projects to catch up with the 20th Century in haste. The State Law and Order Restoration Council (SLORC)
NEWS
June 18, 1995 | DENIS D. GRAY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
With hammers and crowbars they're knocking down old, atmospheric Rangoon, one of Asia's last reminders of the past, to make way for high-rise hotels and shopping centers. The 20th Century has finally caught up with Rangoon, where high-rise once meant the soaring spires of Buddhist pagodas, and tree-lined avenues were flanked by probably the largest collection of British colonial buildings in the world. Now, big chunks of the uniform urbanscape are being ripped out of the heart of Rangoon--now officially named Yangon--and the skyline has been pierced by several buildings approaching 20 stories.
NEWS
June 21, 1991
Mao Thawka, 64, a Burmese poet and speech writer serving a 20-year prison sentence for a poem critical of the military. Mao Thawka, whose real name was U Bathaw and who was a former navy captain, was arrested in 1989 after writing the poem. He also wrote speeches for Aung San Suu Kyi, Burma's leading dissident, who has been under house arrest since July, 1988. Suu Kyi is head of the opposition National League for Democracy, which swept the May, 1989, elections in Burma.
NEWS
November 30, 1987 | From Reuters
The wreckage of a missing South Korean airliner carrying 115 people was found today near a remote Thai village close to the Burmese border, a Thai air force spokesman said. Korean Air Flight 858 disappeared on Sunday as it approached Bangkok for a refueling stop on its flight from Baghdad, Iraq, to Seoul.
MAGAZINE
October 18, 1987 | SHIRLEY SLATER and HARRY BASCH, Slater and Basch are Los Angeles-based free-lance writers
Rangoon turns out to be the stuff of travel fantasy, an exotic mix of Milton's "gorgeous East" rich with "barbaric pearl and gold," Kipling's beguiling sloe-eyed, slim-hipped Burma girl "a-smokin' on a whackin' white cheroot," and the moldering remains of the old Anglo-Indian empire, all of it locked in a time capsule since 1948.
NEWS
June 21, 1988 | Associated Press
The government imposed a dusk-to-dawn curfew in the capital today after at least six people were killed, five of them police officers, in street battles between thousands of protesters and riot police. Government radio said the restrictions will begin immediately and last until Aug. 19.
NEWS
August 3, 1988 | Associated Press
The Burmese government today imposed martial law on the capital of Rangoon after thousands of masked students marched through downtown shouting slogans denouncing leader Sein Lwin, diplomats said. Burma's official Radio Rangoon announced that the city was placed under judicial control of the military at 1 p.m. "to permit those students who would like to study peacefully to do so." The decree said martial law would "cease when the Council of State so declares."
NEWS
December 31, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Thirty-six students who fled Burma's military crackdown flew home Friday, and authorities allowed a one-month extension until Jan. 31 for thousands of others to return from the Thai border region. A Burmese air force plane brought back the second group of students since the government announced that all students who fled after the Sept. 18 military coup and had sought haven could return without retribution.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 1995
Re "Exiting the Burma Road," editorial, Feb. 14: You failed to mention the two American giants, Unocal and Texaco which, with Total of France, recently signed a $400 million deal with the military thugs in Rangoon to build a pipeline through the Mon tribal homeland to transport natural gas from Burma to Thailand. What is so repulsive is the use of slaves to build roads, railroads and other backbreaking projects to catch up with the 20th Century in haste. The State Law and Order Restoration Council (SLORC)
MAGAZINE
October 4, 1992 | Charles Perry
It's quiet in the Racquet Club. Make that very quiet. Of course, the evening is young and the place will get louder as the hours pass. But rest assured--whatever the noise level, the Rangoon Racquet Club will remain . . . clubby. This is a restaurant that doesn't bother to put up a sign outside (or to be precise, any sign you could read from a questing automobile) apart from the letters RRC on an awning over the door. Inside, the RRC looks like a refuge from a tropical climate.
NEWS
June 21, 1991
Mao Thawka, 64, a Burmese poet and speech writer serving a 20-year prison sentence for a poem critical of the military. Mao Thawka, whose real name was U Bathaw and who was a former navy captain, was arrested in 1989 after writing the poem. He also wrote speeches for Aung San Suu Kyi, Burma's leading dissident, who has been under house arrest since July, 1988. Suu Kyi is head of the opposition National League for Democracy, which swept the May, 1989, elections in Burma.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1990 | COLMAN ANDREWS
If Ralph Lauren ever does a Burmese collection, he ought to shoot the ads at Beverly Hills' Rangoon Racquet Club. The place is said to be modeled after the original Rangoon Racquet Club in the capital of Myanmar (formerly known as Burma), and its owner, Emanuel Zwaaf, served in Burma during World War II. The stylistic conceit of the place is of a comfortable colonial gentlemen's club in Southeast Asia. Latticework frames the room, which is cooled by slow-rotating ceiling fans.
NEWS
July 10, 1989 | From Times wire services
An explosion ripped through the first floor of City Hall today, killing three people and wounding four, official radio said. The bombing came hours after up to 15,000 people staged a nearby rally to protest military rule, Western diplomats said. The bomb exploded when a 50-year-old city employee opened a cupboard in a recreation room near the main entrance of the building, Rangoon Radio reported. The employee, a co-worker and a 12-year-old youth were killed in the blast.
NEWS
December 31, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Thirty-six students who fled Burma's military crackdown flew home Friday, and authorities allowed a one-month extension until Jan. 31 for thousands of others to return from the Thai border region. A Burmese air force plane brought back the second group of students since the government announced that all students who fled after the Sept. 18 military coup and had sought haven could return without retribution.
NEWS
September 13, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Thousands of anti-government demonstrators marched through Rangoon on Monday, and opposition leaders demanded that an interim government be appointed to supervise multi-party elections. In other developments, more than 1,000 schoolchildren fasted in support of the protesters, and the military said it will shoot demonstrators spreading a report that two armed forces commanders had threatened to join the protest. Gen.
NEWS
September 15, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
Burmese students, workers and Buddhist monks resumed their general strike Wednesday, trying to force a stubborn regime to give way to an interim government. Hundreds of thousands marched through Rangoon, their pro-democracy chants of past demonstrations replaced by militant threats. "If they don't fall, make them fall," some of them shouted. "No one's at work," a Rangoon-based Western diplomat said when contacted by telephone from Bangkok. Life in Rangoon, a city of 3.
NEWS
September 19, 1988 | Times Wire Services
Soldiers of the new Burmese military government fired on Buddhist monks, students and thousands of other peaceful demonstrators, reportedly killing about 150 since Sunday night. In Washington, the Reagan Administration said it was reviewing assistance programs to Burma that total $14 million annually to determine whether aid should be cut off in light of the coup and violence.
NEWS
September 15, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
Burmese students, workers and Buddhist monks resumed their general strike Wednesday, trying to force a stubborn regime to give way to an interim government. Hundreds of thousands marched through Rangoon, their pro-democracy chants of past demonstrations replaced by militant threats. "If they don't fall, make them fall," some of them shouted. "No one's at work," a Rangoon-based Western diplomat said when contacted by telephone from Bangkok. Life in Rangoon, a city of 3.
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