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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 2009 | Joel Rubin
The City Council's Public Safety Committee on Monday unanimously confirmed Charlie Beck's nomination to be the next Los Angeles police chief. The vote came after a hearing in which community leaders and council members praised Beck's work at the Los Angeles Police Department and called him the right man to take over the department right now. Beck made his own presentation, saying his top goal was to extend the reforms begun by former Police...
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 2010 | By Corina Knoll, Los Angeles Times
In the calm of a warm spring evening, a man in uniform stood alone at Pomona's civic center, gathering his thoughts. Police Chief Dave Keetle stared for a few moments at a plaque dedicated to his father, a former council member, before heading into a meeting. Lately, the younger Keetle has thought about his own legacy and whether he will be asked to dismantle a Police Department his late father passionately supported. At the city's request, the L.A. County Sheriff's Department has completed a preliminary study on the cost of taking over police services.
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OPINION
August 2, 2002
"Pick the Best Chief, Period" (editorial, July 29) says little about what's needed at the LAPD but speaks volumes about your animus toward the department and the 8,000-plus men and women who daily risk their lives to keep you safe. In a poll conducted in January, 93% of rank-and-file officers of the LAPD voted "no confidence" in Chief Bernard Parks. You called that--and the resulting Police Protective League campaign for a new chief--a hardball tactic. We call it democracy in action. We think that all Los Angeles residents agree that we need safe streets; we need a Police Department that operates in partnership with our community; we need to cut crime; we need to continue reform; and we need more officers to get our department up to full strength.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 2010 | By David Zahniser, Los Angeles Times
In a move that has angered police union leaders, Los Angeles Police Department officials have decided that four officers who were scheduled to attend a conference and training session in Tucson next month will not go after all. The trip to the annual Airborne Law Enforcement Assn. conference for the members of the LAPD's air unit was thrown into question last month after the Los Angeles City Council voted to suspend most travel to Arizona as part of its protest of that state's law dealing with illegal immigration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 1993 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Recent exit interviews with departing Los Angeles police officers suggest that frustration over salaries is costing the city experienced officers and also indicate that Mayor Richard Riordan's plan to pay them for working overtime and days off may not persuade many to stay. According to the exit interviews, conducted by the LAPD every time an officer leaves the force, many officers left to go to work for departments that would offer them a better overall contract--not merely overtime pay or pension benefits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2000
Re "Blame Parks for Rampart Scandal," by Stephen Yagman, Commentary, April 12: LAPD Chief Bernard Parks is responsible for the public's faith in the department. After the Christopher Commission report, LAPD senior lead officers in their community liaison positions were there to help with the healing process. Senior leads brought us together, helped return our faith in the department and gave us familiarity, continuity and trust. Since communities have lost touch with their senior leads, we've been thrown back 20 years to cops on one side and citizens on the other.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 2010 | By David Zahniser, Los Angeles Times
In a move that has angered police union leaders, Los Angeles Police Department officials have decided that four officers who were scheduled to attend a conference and training session in Tucson next month will not go after all. The trip to the annual Airborne Law Enforcement Assn. conference for the members of the LAPD's air unit was thrown into question last month after the Los Angeles City Council voted to suspend most travel to Arizona as part of its protest of that state's law dealing with illegal immigration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1995
Re "Police Chief Claims Victory; Others See Credibility in Doubt," June 22: In light of the City Council's action, it is quite apparent that the Los Angeles police chief is held to a different standard compared to the rank-and-file officers within the department. Is this leadership? From a citizen's perspective, it is not. Perhaps when Chief Willie Williams' time in office is complete, the mayor, Police Commission and City Council will look for a new chief who is capable and willing to be held to the same standard as all LAPD officers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1993 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An in-house survey of LAPD officers and civilian employees taken after the 1992 riots determined that the department is beset by complaints about supervisors and increased racial tension, according to a copy of the report sent last week to all LAPD commanding officers. "The overwhelming majority of complaints focused on the failings of the department's managers," Police Chief Willie L.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1994 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles City Council adopted the police union's contract offer Friday, sending the contentious labor dispute into its final phase--a vote by the membership of the Police Protective League. Meeting in closed session, the council voted 12 to 2 in favor of a 6% salary increase over two years, the first raise for the Police Department since 1991.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 2009 | Joel Rubin
The City Council's Public Safety Committee on Monday unanimously confirmed Charlie Beck's nomination to be the next Los Angeles police chief. The vote came after a hearing in which community leaders and council members praised Beck's work at the Los Angeles Police Department and called him the right man to take over the department right now. Beck made his own presentation, saying his top goal was to extend the reforms begun by former Police...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2009 | Joel Rubin
For a man widely seen as the disciple of just-exited LAPD Chief William J. Bratton, Charlie Beck on Wednesday exhibited some notable contrasts in style and strategy from the man he was tapped to replace. In an interview with Times reporters, editors and editorial board members, Deputy Chief Beck portrayed himself as a leader rooted by his ties to rank-and-file officers, as opposed to Bratton, who reformed the department by focusing on its upper echelon. The 32-year veteran of the Los Angeles Police Department said he would concentrate on pushing down reforms Bratton introduced into the mind-set of the thousands of officers who are the heart of the organization.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 2009 | Jack Leonard and Richard Winton
He came to Los Angeles in 2002, a brash New Englander in a hurry to make his mark and unwilling to mince words. When a community activist attacked the department, Chief William J. Bratton went on CNN and labeled him a "nitwit." When the City Council refused his request for more officers, he bellowed: "Let them start attending some of the funerals of the victims of crime."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2009 | Andrew Blankstein
The union representing rank-and-file Los Angeles police officers filed a lawsuit against the department Wednesday, accusing it of violating its own policies and state employment safety rules when commanders allegedly told officers not to wear protective helmets during a Jan. 10 demonstration in Westwood. The suit filed in Los Angeles County Superior Court named Chief William J.
OPINION
August 2, 2002
"Pick the Best Chief, Period" (editorial, July 29) says little about what's needed at the LAPD but speaks volumes about your animus toward the department and the 8,000-plus men and women who daily risk their lives to keep you safe. In a poll conducted in January, 93% of rank-and-file officers of the LAPD voted "no confidence" in Chief Bernard Parks. You called that--and the resulting Police Protective League campaign for a new chief--a hardball tactic. We call it democracy in action. We think that all Los Angeles residents agree that we need safe streets; we need a Police Department that operates in partnership with our community; we need to cut crime; we need to continue reform; and we need more officers to get our department up to full strength.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2000
Re "Blame Parks for Rampart Scandal," by Stephen Yagman, Commentary, April 12: LAPD Chief Bernard Parks is responsible for the public's faith in the department. After the Christopher Commission report, LAPD senior lead officers in their community liaison positions were there to help with the healing process. Senior leads brought us together, helped return our faith in the department and gave us familiarity, continuity and trust. Since communities have lost touch with their senior leads, we've been thrown back 20 years to cops on one side and citizens on the other.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 2009 | Jack Leonard and Richard Winton
He came to Los Angeles in 2002, a brash New Englander in a hurry to make his mark and unwilling to mince words. When a community activist attacked the department, Chief William J. Bratton went on CNN and labeled him a "nitwit." When the City Council refused his request for more officers, he bellowed: "Let them start attending some of the funerals of the victims of crime."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2009 | Andrew Blankstein
The union representing rank-and-file Los Angeles police officers filed a lawsuit against the department Wednesday, accusing it of violating its own policies and state employment safety rules when commanders allegedly told officers not to wear protective helmets during a Jan. 10 demonstration in Westwood. The suit filed in Los Angeles County Superior Court named Chief William J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1996 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles police officers will receive a series of raises totaling 18% over four years, costing taxpayers about $130 million, under a proposed contract hammered out Friday by the City Council and leaders of the police union. The pact emerged after a marathon negotiating session behind closed doors at City Hall that stretched nearly six hours, and came just two days after the Police Protective League replaced its president with a notorious hard-liner.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1995
Re "Police Chief Claims Victory; Others See Credibility in Doubt," June 22: In light of the City Council's action, it is quite apparent that the Los Angeles police chief is held to a different standard compared to the rank-and-file officers within the department. Is this leadership? From a citizen's perspective, it is not. Perhaps when Chief Willie Williams' time in office is complete, the mayor, Police Commission and City Council will look for a new chief who is capable and willing to be held to the same standard as all LAPD officers.
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