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Raoul Cedras

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NEWS
October 9, 1994 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Where is Raoul Cedras? One report had the Haitian army commander at the airport, leaving for exile in Spain. No, said another source, he left his house at 2 a.m. for the Dominican Republic. All wrong, went another account, the general and his wife were at their beach house. But despite the dashes from airport to border crossing by reporters, there was no credible evidence that Cedras had gone anywhere, nor that he intended to, at least for the time being.
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NEWS
October 22, 1994 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's been quite a fall for Romeo Halloun. Gone are the Uzi submachine guns, the baskets of no-questions-asked money, the $60,000 cars and the swagger that comes with being the biggest thug on the block. Halloun, a 30ish son of a wealthy trader in smuggled goods, sits in a U.S. Army detention cell here, representative of a short-lived class of Haitians notable for their audacity and, in the minds of many people, their stupidity.
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NEWS
February 2, 1992 | Reuters
Army chief Brig. Gen. Raoul Cedras, whose dismissal has been demanded by ousted President Jean-Bertrand Aristide as a condition for his return from exile, has been promoted to lieutenant general, state radio announced Saturday. Radio Nationale said the army-backed provisional government issued a decree Friday awarding Cedras, 43, the highest rank in the Haitian army.
NEWS
October 11, 1994 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
All of the inhibitions created by three years of frightening military rule evaporated instantly in the searing sun Monday as thousands of Haitians watching the resignation of Lt. Gen. Raoul Cedras took delight in taunting the hated army, its commander and its network of killers. And when Cedras delivered his farewell speech at military headquarters, the crowd simply drowned him out. "Thieves!" "Murderers!" "Put handcuffs on Cedras! Tie him up!"
NEWS
July 2, 1993 | Times Staff Writer
Exiled Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide and army commander Lt. Gen. Raoul Cedras on Thursday considered a set of proposals by U.N. mediator Dante Caputo to govern Aristide's restoration to office. According to diplomatic sources, the Caputo plan--developed after four days of talks on Governors Island in New York harbor--proposes that Aristide return by Oct.
NEWS
June 25, 1993 | Associated Press
Haiti's ousted president, Jean-Bertrand Aristide, will meet the army officer who deposed him for talks Sunday on restoring democracy in their homeland. The chief U.N. envoy to Haiti, Dante Caputo, made the announcement, saying that talks between Aristide and Lt. Gen. Raoul Cedras will begin at 9 a.m. at U.N. headquarters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1994
By threatening the use of military force in Haiti (May 4), President Clinton has begun to learn how to deal with unreasonable totalitarian dictators. Raoul Cedras will never concede without a fight, because he knows that too many people want to kill him for his crimes against humanity. Due to the black market in fuel and arms, total control of the Haitian people through terror, and no trade sanctions on food, the Haitian military has everything it needs to ride out even stepped-up economic sanctions.
NEWS
June 29, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Talks on restoring democracy to Haiti appeared in trouble on their second day Monday, and sources close to the talks said military leaders appeared intransigent and determined to retain some power. Lt. Gen. Raoul Cedras was pressing to retain control of the security forces when civilian rule is restored, said the sources, speaking on condition of anonymity. Cedras insisted on retaining his status as army commander when President Jean-Bertrand Aristide returns to the country, sources said.
NEWS
August 7, 1994 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Haitian military leader Lt. Gen. Raoul Cedras said in an interview aired Saturday that he believes a U.S. invasion of Haiti is unavoidable, and he predicted bloodshed "on both sides" because his armed forces would resist the takeover to their fullest. William H. Gray III, President Clinton's special adviser on Haiti, said he agreed that the two sides appear to be on a "collision" course.
NEWS
March 7, 1992 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joseph Nerette, the figurehead president of Haiti's military-run regime, on Friday defied an internationally arranged agreement to return ousted President Jean-Bertrand Aristide to power and end a choking economic embargo. Saying he would not resign his post, Nerette told the National Assembly that the agreement "violates" the Haitian constitution and is the result of unacceptable foreign interference in Haiti's internal affairs.
NEWS
October 9, 1994 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Where is Raoul Cedras? One report had the Haitian army commander at the airport, leaving for exile in Spain. No, said another source, he left his house at 2 a.m. for the Dominican Republic. All wrong, went another account, the general and his wife were at their beach house. But despite the dashes from airport to border crossing by reporters, there was no credible evidence that Cedras had gone anywhere, nor that he intended to, at least for the time being.
NEWS
September 25, 1994 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a long, frustrating day of negotiations with Haiti's military rulers last Saturday night, former President Jimmy Carter abruptly excused himself from a dinner with Haitian businessmen, closeted himself in his suite in Port-au-Prince's Villa Creole Hotel and typed for an hour on his laptop computer. The page that he produced--and handed to Lt. Gen. Raoul Cedras a few hours later--became the first draft of what soon evolved into the American agreement with Haiti's military regime.
NEWS
September 24, 1994 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Exiled Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide, apparently holding out an olive branch to his political foes, agreed Friday to call a special session of the island nation's Parliament to vote on amnesty for the leaders of the bloody coup that deposed him three years ago. With about 15,000 U.S. troops poised to referee, Aristide and Lt. Gen. Raoul Cedras, the chief coup plotter, jockeyed for position in advance of Oct.
NEWS
September 23, 1994 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a narrow, new interpretation of the agreement that averted an American invasion of Haiti, the Clinton Administration said Thursday that it is very unlikely that Lt. Gen. Raoul Cedras and other Haitian military leaders will get the amnesty from prosecution they are counting on to remain in the Caribbean nation.
NEWS
September 21, 1994 | KENNETH FREED and ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The new outbreaks of violence against citizens by the Haitian military on Tuesday expose a potential flaw in the Clinton Administration's Haitian peace accord--that it may have no effective plan for quelling the human rights violations that were a major reason for U.S. intervention. Indeed, U.S.
NEWS
September 21, 1994 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Less than a week ago, President Clinton described Haitian military leader Raoul Cedras as the head of a band of "armed thugs" responsible for murder, rape and other atrocities. Now, the U.S. government is treating Cedras with the deference due an allied commander. The sudden rehabilitation of Cedras, as a direct consequence of the deal that headed off a planned American invasion of Haiti, raises serious questions about the ultimate direction of U.S.
NEWS
June 28, 1993 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Deposed Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide and his nemesis, army commander Raoul Cedras, shared a small island off Manhattan but did not meet Sunday as formal and intricate negotiations began for a transfer of power back to Aristide. Special U.N. mediator Dante Caputo, the French-educated former Argentine foreign minister, served as the intermediary between Aristide and the general who ousted him.
NEWS
November 23, 1991 | STAN YARBRO and KENNETH FREED, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide and members of the military-supported regime that deposed him launched their first face-to-face negotiations here on Friday to try to solve Haiti's political crisis. Neither side appeared to have budged from its uncompromising position. But after their initial, one-hour meeting Friday evening, one negotiator described the talk as "positive." (The discussions are scheduled to resume early today and last until Sunday.
NEWS
September 20, 1994 | JACK NELSON, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
Former President Jimmy Carter said Monday that his Haiti mission twice teetered on the edge of failure and the military leaders in Port-au-Prince were on the verge of deciding to fight to the bitter end--only to be turned around by emotion-charged appeals from American negotiators. The first crisis came Sunday, when American negotiators confronted Yannick Cedras, the wife of Haitian military chief Raoul Cedras--a strong-willed woman little known in America.
NEWS
September 19, 1994 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former President Jimmy Carter was ushered into early retirement by the American voters because they saw him as ineffective at home and weak abroad, but he has shown again this weekend that he retains two surpassing virtues: a preternatural patience and an unshakable faith in his fellow man.
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