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Raoul Peck

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2001 | EMORY HOLMES II
Haitian-born filmmaker Raoul Peck, 48, sits in a back booth at a restaurant in Los Angeles, hands clasped on the table before him. He is balding, circumspect, and his oval, copper-brown face is etched at the chin with a slight Vandyke beard. Dressed in a featureless black suit with his shirt collar open at the neck, Peck exudes the refinement and poise of a foreign minister, which he once was.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2001 | EMORY HOLMES II
Haitian-born filmmaker Raoul Peck, 48, sits in a back booth at a restaurant in Los Angeles, hands clasped on the table before him. He is balding, circumspect, and his oval, copper-brown face is etched at the chin with a slight Vandyke beard. Dressed in a featureless black suit with his shirt collar open at the neck, Peck exudes the refinement and poise of a foreign minister, which he once was.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2002 | From Associated Press
Zanzibar's annual film festival opened Friday, bringing together filmmakers and musicians from Africa and other parts of the world to show their movies and perform their music in historic venues across this Indian Ocean archipelago. The fifth annual Festival of the Dhow Countries focuses on the culture of countries that influenced Zanzibar over the last millennium, influences carried from India to the Arabian Sea and down Africa's eastern coast by dhows, wooden ships with triangular sails.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2001 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"Lumumba" is potent stuff. Complex, powerful, intensely dramatic, its compelling depiction of an African political tragedy echoes Woodrow Wilson's apocryphal remark about the couldn't-be-more-different "Birth of a Nation": "It is like writing history with lightning." The tragedy is not only that of Patrice Lumumba, a man whose career had the trajectory of a skyrocket.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2005 | Robert Lloyd, Times Staff Writer
"Sometimes in April," which premieres Saturday on HBO, is the second movie in the space of a year to concern the 1994 Rwandan genocide, in which Hutu extremists and those under their influence murdered more than 800,000 Tutsis (and moderate Hutus) within 100 days. "Hotel Rwanda" is its illustrious Oscar-nominated predecessor, and both will before long be joined by two more films on the subject, "Shooting Dogs" from BBC Films and the French-Canadian "Sunday at the Pool in Kigali."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 1994 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the third annual Pan African Film Festival running tonight through Oct. 26 at the Sunset 5, its director Ayuko Babu says, "We feel good about where we are. Hard economic realities have made us more realistic. We get a tremendous response--there's a hunger in the black community for this festival, and we're getting a lot of white voices on the phone asking for a screening schedule."
NEWS
June 2, 2005 | Nancy Ramsey, Special to The Times
"I missed the Rwandan genocide, I'm embarrassed to say," filmmaker Peter Raymont readily admits. "Like many people in journalism and filmmaking. I remember vague reports of tribal warfare in some obscure African country."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2001 | KENNETH TURAN, Kenneth Turan is The Times' film critic.
Talk to filmgoers and they say the year just ending has been a particularly disappointing one. Talk to Oscar prognosticators and they say it's hard to come up with a list of five potential best picture nominees. Talk to critics putting together year-end lists and they say it's much harder to fill the top spot than Nos. 2 through 10. Put all that together and you have a picture of 2001 as the year the studio system let us down. Big time.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2004 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
The evil that men do not only lives after them, it often dwarfs our puny attempts to do good in the world, mocking the very notion of a shared humanity. Who has not felt as Kurtz did in "Heart of Darkness," whispering "The horror, the horror" when confronted with yet another unimaginable nightmare man has perpetrated on man. Africa was the setting for Joseph Conrad's novella, and Africa has had more than its share of these horrors inflicted upon it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1994 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
People remember the little orange boxes. Since the 1950s, American children have carried them door-to-door on Halloween night, collecting donations for UNICEF instead of candy. The box was a bridge, linking children of the world's most wealthy nation, with needy children in foreign countries.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2001
MAY 11 BREAD AND ROSES Drama Lions Gate With: Pilar Padilla, Elpidia Carrillo, Adrien Brody. The idea: L.A. janitors organize against corporate employers. Writer: Paul Laverty. Director: Ken Loach. So? Ripped from L.A. headlines, acclaimed at Cannes. CALLE 54 Documentary Miramax With: Tito Puente, Eliane Elias, Chucho Valdes, Cachao. The idea: Studio performances by genre leaders illuminate music's role in Latino culture. Director: Fernando Trueba. So? Remember "The Buena Vista Social Club'?
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