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Raoul Wallenberg

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April 17, 2012 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON -- World War II hero Raoul Wallenberg, singer Lena Horne and golfer Jack Nicklaus would be added to the list of Congressional Gold Medal recipients under measures that have cleared the House. The action comes as the House prepares to vote this week to create a Mark Twain commemorative coin to raise money for organizations dedicated to preserving the author's legacy, notwithstanding his low opinion of Congress. ("It could probably be shown by facts and figures that there is no distinctly native American criminal class except Congress," Twain wrote.)
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NATIONAL
April 17, 2012 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON -- World War II hero Raoul Wallenberg, singer Lena Horne and golfer Jack Nicklaus would be added to the list of Congressional Gold Medal recipients under measures that have cleared the House. The action comes as the House prepares to vote this week to create a Mark Twain commemorative coin to raise money for organizations dedicated to preserving the author's legacy, notwithstanding his low opinion of Congress. ("It could probably be shown by facts and figures that there is no distinctly native American criminal class except Congress," Twain wrote.)
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OPINION
January 4, 2008
Re "Lantos says he won't run in fall," Jan. 3 It is symbolic that Rep. Tom Lantos (D-Burlingame) announced his illness and his stepping-down in the same month that we commemorate the day that Raoul Wallenberg -- the man who saved Lantos and his wife more than 60 years ago -- was taken by the Soviets, never to be seen again. Lantos never forgot the man who saved his life. When elected to Congress in 1981, he was the driving force behind President Reagan awarding Wallenberg honorary U.S. citizenship.
OPINION
January 4, 2008
Re "Lantos says he won't run in fall," Jan. 3 It is symbolic that Rep. Tom Lantos (D-Burlingame) announced his illness and his stepping-down in the same month that we commemorate the day that Raoul Wallenberg -- the man who saved Lantos and his wife more than 60 years ago -- was taken by the Soviets, never to be seen again. Lantos never forgot the man who saved his life. When elected to Congress in 1981, he was the driving force behind President Reagan awarding Wallenberg honorary U.S. citizenship.
NEWS
December 26, 1985 | MATHIS CHAZANOV, Times Staff Writer
The Jewish Defense League is lobbying to have Fairfax Avenue renamed in honor of Raoul Wallenberg, a Swedish envoy who saved thousands of Hungarian Jews from Nazi death camps and vanished after falling into Soviet hands toward the end of World War II. "By this gesture, everybody will know the name of Wallenberg," said Irv Rubin, national director of the group.
NEWS
April 7, 1985 | LYNN SIMROSS, Times Staff Writer
The subject, his survival of the Holocaust, was painful for Tibor Vayda to talk about, but as the conversation turned to Raoul Wallenberg, that pain did not prevent him from speaking of "the only one real hero, the one who risked his life for us every day." For Vayda and his fellow Jews of Budapest, their roundup, from the spring of 1944 to January, 1945, was the last Nazi atrocity during World War II, the end of Hitler's "Final Solution."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1994 | WILLIAM KOREY, William Korey is director of international policy research for B'nai B'rith
It was on July 9, 1944, that Raoul Wallenberg, the 32-year-old Swedish aristocrat, arrived in Budapest on his extraordinary mission to help rescue a desperate Hungarian Jewry. Few knew then and remarkably few know today that his employer was an unusual government agency--the U.S. War Refugee Board. The board was created by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in January, 1944, shortly after he learned from Secretary of the Treasury Henry Morgenthau Jr.
NEWS
July 28, 1989 | From Associated Press
President Bush signed a resolution Thursday designating Oct. 5 as Raoul Wallenberg Recognition Day. Wallenberg was a wealthy Swedish diplomat in Hungary during World War II who is credited with rescuing thousands of Jews from Nazi roundups by issuing them fictitious Swedish credentials.
NEWS
November 21, 1991 | Reuters
The Soviet Union gave Sweden about 70 secret documents Wednesday on the case of missing Swedish diplomat Raoul Wallenberg. The documents were presented in Moscow to Ambassador Orjan Berner by outgoing Soviet Foreign Minister Boris D. Pankin. Wallenberg, who saved thousands of Hungarian Jews from Nazi death camps, disappeared after Soviet troops entered Budapest in the last days of World War II.
MAGAZINE
February 4, 1996 | Andrew Asch
When Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin was assassinated last December, Angelenos commemorated him by laying candles, roses, ficus leaves and olive branches at the base of the Raoul Wallenberg statue in the Fairfax district. Those who regularly walk by the statue were not surprised. Almost every week since the memorial was erected in 1988, elderly Jews have left offerings by the statue of the Swedish diplomat who saved tens of thousands of Hungarian Jews during World War II.
TRAVEL
July 20, 2003
I enjoyed "Budapest, in Living Color" (July 13). Too bad [author] Robert Strauss and I don't know each other. I could recommend names of restaurants where the "fare is not only hearty but has much flair." The comment he makes about the Hungarians' defiance of the Nazis was not correct. I and the other 20,000 Jews left in Hungary after the war can only give thanks to Raoul Wallenberg and a few other courageous individuals for saving our lives. Katherine Kurschner Los Angeles Reading Robert Strauss' wonderful article about Budapest and seeing the color photo of the stained-glass-covered thermal pool at the Hotel Gellert brought back fond memories.
NEWS
August 26, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Less than 24 hours after it was inaugurated by Sweden's king and foreign dignitaries, a monument to Raoul Wallenberg was defaced with spray paint. White paint was sprayed on three of the 12 knee-high figures of dark bronze that look like faceless people or gnarled logs. There were no words or claim of responsibility. "I feel humiliated," Romuald Wroblewski, the son of a Holocaust survivor, was quoted as saying by a Swedish newspaper's Web site.
NEWS
January 13, 2001 | Associated Press
Investigators studying the fate of Raoul Wallenberg left open the possibility Friday that the prominent diplomat did not die in a Soviet prison in 1947, and they implied that Swedish officials did not do enough to save him. A 362-page report by a Swedish-Russian panel set up in 1991 left many unanswered questions about the Swedish diplomat revered for helping tens of thousands of Jews escape Nazi-occupied Hungary.
NEWS
January 4, 2001 | Reuters
The Soviet Union was willing to trade captured Swedish diplomat Raoul Wallenberg after World War II for Soviet citizens who had defected to Sweden, but Stockholm turned down the offer, a Swedish newspaper said Wednesday. Wallenberg, credited with saving thousands of Jews in Hungary from Nazi death camps by granting them protection under the neutral Swedish flag or by issuing false passports, was last seen when he was arrested in 1945 by Soviet troops in Budapest, the capital.
NEWS
December 23, 2000 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the first time, Russia admitted Friday that Raoul Wallenberg, the Swedish diplomat who saved tens of thousands of Jews from the Nazis, was illegally arrested by Soviet troops and died in KGB custody. The statement by Russia's prosecutor general is the first official acknowledgment of wrongdoing by Soviet authorities and a public admission that Wallenberg was a victim of cynical Soviet suspicion and Stalin's police state.
NEWS
November 28, 2000 | From Associated Press
Raoul Wallenberg, the Swedish diplomat who disappeared after helping tens of thousands of Jews escape Nazi-occupied Hungary, undoubtedly was shot and killed by the Soviets, the head of a Russian presidential commission said Monday. The statement by Alexander Yakovlev, chairman of the presidential commission on rehabilitation of victims of political repression, indicates that Russia may be on the verge of confirming allegations that Soviet authorities denied for nearly half a century.
NEWS
August 26, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Less than 24 hours after it was inaugurated by Sweden's king and foreign dignitaries, a monument to Raoul Wallenberg was defaced with spray paint. White paint was sprayed on three of the 12 knee-high figures of dark bronze that look like faceless people or gnarled logs. There were no words or claim of responsibility. "I feel humiliated," Romuald Wroblewski, the son of a Holocaust survivor, was quoted as saying by a Swedish newspaper's Web site.
NEWS
January 4, 2001 | Reuters
The Soviet Union was willing to trade captured Swedish diplomat Raoul Wallenberg after World War II for Soviet citizens who had defected to Sweden, but Stockholm turned down the offer, a Swedish newspaper said Wednesday. Wallenberg, credited with saving thousands of Jews in Hungary from Nazi death camps by granting them protection under the neutral Swedish flag or by issuing false passports, was last seen when he was arrested in 1945 by Soviet troops in Budapest, the capital.
NEWS
May 5, 1996 | From Associated Press
World War II hero Raoul Wallenberg spied for an agency that was a predecessor of the CIA, U.S. News & World Report reported Saturday. A U.S. News investigation of recently declassified CIA documents revealed that while the Swedish diplomat worked to save Hungarian Jews from the Nazis, he also was helping the Office of Strategic Services make contact with anti-Nazi resistance leaders in Hungary, the magazine said.
MAGAZINE
February 4, 1996 | Andrew Asch
When Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin was assassinated last December, Angelenos commemorated him by laying candles, roses, ficus leaves and olive branches at the base of the Raoul Wallenberg statue in the Fairfax district. Those who regularly walk by the statue were not surprised. Almost every week since the memorial was erected in 1988, elderly Jews have left offerings by the statue of the Swedish diplomat who saved tens of thousands of Hungarian Jews during World War II.
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