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WORLD
February 24, 2007 | William C. Rempel, Times Staff Writer
THE official end of the notorious Cali cocaine cartel came late last year here with little more commotion than the rap of a judge's gavel. The Colombian drug lords Miguel Rodriguez Orejuela, 63, and Gilberto Rodriguez Orejuela, 67, entered guilty pleas and were ushered off to federal prison for the next 30 years -- no Miami Vice-like dramatics, no bodies riddled with gunfire in the manner of Medellin rival Pablo Escobar.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2014 | By Patrick Kevin Day
NBC News anchor Brian Williams was a guest on "The Tonight Show" on Monday, and to celebrate, Jimmy Fallon introduced yet another montage of Williams "rapping" a classic song. This time, the straight-laced newsman tackled Snoop Dogg's 1994 hit, "Gin and Juice. " The songs are actually hundreds of clips of the "NBC Nightly News" edited together with Swiss watch precision. Previous installments in this ongoing survey of the history of hip-hop through the "Nightly News" have included Williams performing "Rapper's Delight" and N.W.A.'s "Straight Outta Compton.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1989
What a sick, perverted life these rap people must lead; and what is worse is the example they set for youths. Come on, folks, let's face it: Rap is crap! MARK PAVLOVICH Long Beach
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2014 | By Deborah Vankin
On this warm Easter Sunday morning, New York street artist Jason Shelowitz (a.k.a. Jay Shells) is on the streets of Inglewood. He pulls over his rented silver Chevy at the bustling intersection of Imperial Highway and Western Avenue, hip-hop prattling on the car stereo. Then he grabs a step ladder from the back seat, adjusts his black “Rap” baseball cap and races across three lanes on foot. Now on the traffic island, cars whizzing by on both sides, he eyeballs a pole sporting a “One Way” street sign.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2012 | By Ernest Hardy and August Brown, Los Angeles Times
In 1985, Los Angeles rapper Toddy Tee released what could be considered West Coast hip-hop's opening salvo against police brutality in black neighborhoods. The electro-grooved "Batterram," named for the battering ram that then-LAPD Chief Daryl F. Gates used to smash into homes of suspected drug dealers, was a hit on local radio station KDAY-AM. The track went on to become a protest anthem in minority neighborhoods around the city where the device was often deployed against homes that were later proved drug-free: "You're mistakin' my pad for a rockhouse / Well, I know to you we all look the same / But I'm not the one slingin' caine / I work nine to five and ain't a damn thing changed …" rapped Toddy Tee. The L.A. riots of 1992 arrived with its soundtrack in place.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2010 | By Chris Lee
Call the RZA hip-hop's foremost alchemist. The self-professed former drug dealer-turned-Grammy-winning rapper-producer has defied all odds to spin not lead into gold, but démodé pop culture and arcane philosophical beliefs into platinum disc upon platinum disc. And now, after spending years under the tutelage of several high-profile filmmakers, including Quentin Tarantino, he's preparing to unleash his unique mash-up sensibility on the big screen, in a project that will be part chop-socky flick, part spaghetti western and all RZA. As founding father of the hard-core Staten Island rap collective Wu-Tang Clan, RZA (pronounced "rizza," given name: Robert Diggs)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2010 | By Scott Collins and Geoff Boucher
Grammy viewers might have wondered what the bleep happened to the music. During a medley performed near the end of Sunday's award show by rappers Lil Wayne, Eminem and Drake, CBS silenced the audio at least 10 times, presumably due to salty language. Grammy executive producer Ken Ehrlich said Monday that the hip-hop era has created a tricky situation for award shows, which must keep up with the culture but also abide by broadcast decency standards. Indeed, networks have spent years battling the Federal Communications Commission over curse words uttered during national telecasts.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2014 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
When Jhene Aiko sang the opening lines of her Drake collaboration “From Time” during her set Sunday night at Coachella in Indio, the crowd -- singing the bone-chilling lyrics back to her -- knew what was coming next. The Gobi tent was already lighted up by hundreds of smartphones when Drake emerged onstage. The deafening screams were likely heard across the festival grounds. He eased into his verse, gliding across the stage slowly to give everyone (OK, mainly the women) a lasting image.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2013 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
Here are three words we thought we'd never hear at Pop & Hiss: “Dolly Parton raps.” But there are things that we come across -- or in this case pops up in our inbox -- so outlandish, and amazing, they can't be ignored.  Parton has parodied herself for our entertainment and it's only right we share it with the world. The country legend hasn't abandoned her throne at Dollywood to try a hand at a new career. But the Grammy-winning legend made a surprise visit to “The Queen Latifah Show” to perform a freestyle she wrote in honor in Latifah, her costar in the 2012 movie “Joyful Noise.” PHOTOS: Celebrities by The Times Clad in her own version of hip-hop couture -- a blond wig, chic gold chains, chunky earrings and a sleek black dress and leggings combo -- Parton delivered a spry 16 bars and looked hot in the process (too far, or no?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2014 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
When Jhene Aiko sang the opening lines of her Drake collaboration “From Time” during her set Sunday night at Coachella in Indio, the crowd -- singing the bone-chilling lyrics back to her -- knew what was coming next. The Gobi tent was already lighted up by hundreds of smartphones when Drake emerged onstage. The deafening screams were likely heard across the festival grounds. He eased into his verse, gliding across the stage slowly to give everyone (OK, mainly the women) a lasting image.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2014 | Kate Linthicum
TEL AVIV - Tamer Nafar, a 34-year-old rapper who has been described as the Chuck D of Palestinian hip-hop, was standing on a sidewalk dressed in a skin-tight black bodysuit and wearing a silky red wig. "Can I see more duck lips?" the director prodded from behind the camera. Nafar pursed obediently. FOR THE RECORD: Tamer Nafar: A profile of Palestinian rapper Tamer Nafar in the April 13 Arts and Books section said that SodaStream, a company that manufactures beverage carbonation machines, was headquartered in an Israeli settlement in the West Bank.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2014 | By David Ng
Anne Hathaway has yet to make good on her oft-professed desire to perform in a Broadway musical. Her Oscar-winning turn as Fantine in the 2012 movie version of "Les Miserables" showed that she has the singing chops. And if we need more proof, the actress appeared on NBC's "The Tonight Show" on Tuesday to remind us that she can belt it out as good as Broadway's best. Hathaway, sporting close-cropped hair and a black pant-suit number, was accompanied on the piano by host Jimmy Fallon in a series of rap and hip-hop songs performed in a humorously over-the-top Broadway style.
OPINION
April 7, 2014 | By Charis E. Kubrin and Erik Nielson
For 16 months, Bay Area rapper Deandre Mitchell - better known as Laz Tha Boy - has been sitting in a jail cell faced with a decision no artist should have to make: whether to defend his innocence at trial, knowing his music likely will be used as evidence against him, or take a plea bargain and admit to crimes he maintains he did not commit. Mitchell's case dates to October 2012, when he was indicted for his alleged role in two gang-related shootings that occurred that year. Prosecutors didn't present a single arrest or conviction to establish Mitchell's association with a criminal gang, and with conflicting eyewitness testimony - and no physical evidence connecting him to the shootings, according to defense attorney John Hamasaki - prosecutors elected to introduce something else: Mitchell's violent gangsta rap videos and lyrics, which were presented to the grand jury as evidence of his criminal behavior.
NATIONAL
February 14, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
The Florida jury weighing the fate of Michael Dunn, accused of shooting an unarmed teenager to death during a dispute over loud music, told officials Friday that it had hit a wall in its deliberations and then broken for the night. Deliberations were to resume Saturday morning. Jurors have deliberated for more than 181/2 hours since receiving the case Wednesday afternoon. On Friday, the jury asked the judge whether it could hand in a verdict on some charges even if it could not reach a unanimous agreement on one charge.
NEWS
February 13, 2014 | By Stacey Leasca
As the snowflakes pile up from Kentucky and North Carolina up into New England, children everywhere are wishing and hoping for that magical announcement: School is canceled for the day. Can that announcement ever get old? For James Detwiler, an elementary school principal in Burlington, Ky., it did: “I was getting bored with saying the same thing over and over again.” Detwiler, principal at Stephens Elementary, told the Los Angeles Times that his Kentucky school district was on its 10th or 11th snow day. So he took as his inspiration a Broadway musical -- and then '80s rock.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2014 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
There are things that don't make sense, and then there are things so bewildering that they require visual proof. Billy Ray Cryus' remake of “Achy Breaky Heart” is both. Cyrus, for reasons unclear, decided to issue a remix to his 1992 smash. And the result is, to be generous, an absolute mess. “Achy Breaky 2,” takes the country pop tune,  which has  justly been ranked by VH1 as one of the most awesomely bad songs ever, and inexplicably reimagines it as a club rap stomper.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2014 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
The gasps, groans and expletives were abundant backstage Sunday as Macklemore & Ryan Lewis swept the rap categories during the untelevised portion of the Grammy Awards ceremony. Their massive hit “Thrift Shop” took rap performance and song, and their debut, “The Heist,” nabbed the trophy for rap album over breakout Compton rapper Kendrick Lamar's striking debut, "Good Kid, M.A.A.D City. " The controversy was immediate. The indie Seattle duo's early wins sparked a trending topic on Twitter as outraged hip-hop purists and critics admonished voters for picking the pair's work over albums from Drake, Kanye West, Jay Z and Lamar.
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