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January 4, 1990 | LEE MAY and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Federal investigators said here Wednesday that they have "no shortage" of leads in the recent mail-bomb murders of a federal judge and a lawyer in the South, but they acknowledged that the cases could remain unsolved for some time. Tom Moore, an FBI spokesman in Birmingham, Ala., noted that the 1979 murder of John Wood, a federal judge in Texas, "took almost five years to solve," but added that "we're cautiously optimistic that this won't take that long."
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NEWS
January 4, 1990 | LEE MAY and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Federal investigators said here Wednesday that they have "no shortage" of leads in the recent mail-bomb murders of a federal judge and a lawyer in the South, but they acknowledged that the cases could remain unsolved for some time. Tom Moore, an FBI spokesman in Birmingham, Ala., noted that the 1979 murder of John Wood, a federal judge in Texas, "took almost five years to solve," but added that "we're cautiously optimistic that this won't take that long."
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SPORTS
May 1, 2002 | From Staff and Wire Reports
After 15 NFL seasons, 10 Pro Bowl selections and a Super Bowl victory, safety Rod Woodson doesn't have many lifelong ambitions left. He did get one more Tuesday, joining the Oakland Raiders. Woodson, 37, was released by the Baltimore Ravens in a cost-cutting move after recording 74 tackles and three of his 61 career interceptions--tops among active players and eighth in NFL history--in 2001. "I've been a Raiders' fan forever," Woodson said.
OPINION
December 22, 2010 | By Sheldon Krimsky and Tania Simoncelli
We have seen repeatedly that DNA can shed light on wrongful convictions. To date, about 250 people who were wrongly convicted have been exonerated because of DNA evidence that was reexamined after they were pronounced guilty. But we are a long way from a system that grants fair access to DNA testing. One primary constraint on the use of DNA in response to a claim of innocence is the availability of the relevant crime scene evidence. According to the Innocence Project in New York, 22% of the cases that its team investigated from 2004 to 2008 had to be terminated because the crime scene DNA evidence was no longer available.
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