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Rape Kuwait

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October 11, 1990 | SUE ELLEN CHRISTIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Speaking softly in a voice that often broke, an American-born woman who fled Kuwait after the Aug. 2 Iraqi invasion told members of Congress about the scene at a hospital there: "We took our cousin, who was in labor, to Sabah Maternity Hospital. Upon our arrival, we saw a Kuwaiti woman at the front door--in hysterics, because she was in labor and they (Iraqi troops) would not allow her to enter," said Deborah Hadi, pausing to fight back a sob.
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NEWS
October 11, 1990 | SUE ELLEN CHRISTIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Speaking softly in a voice that often broke, an American-born woman who fled Kuwait after the Aug. 2 Iraqi invasion told members of Congress about the scene at a hospital there: "We took our cousin, who was in labor, to Sabah Maternity Hospital. Upon our arrival, we saw a Kuwaiti woman at the front door--in hysterics, because she was in labor and they (Iraqi troops) would not allow her to enter," said Deborah Hadi, pausing to fight back a sob.
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NEWS
August 14, 1990 | Reuters
An airline flight attendant who reached Jordan on Monday said Iraqi troops stormed into a hostel in Kuwait city and raped five Kuwait Airlines flight attendants--two Britons, two Egyptians and a Filipina. Nawal Bel Hadj, 24, of Tunisia, said in an interview that she witnessed the attacks Aug. 7, five days after Iraq invaded Kuwait. "Eight Iraqi soldiers holding machine guns stormed our hostel," she said. "First, they asked our Indian servant for water.
NEWS
August 16, 1990 | Reuters
Two British airline flight attendants have denied a Tunisian colleague's assertion that they were raped by Iraqi soldiers in Kuwait, a Foreign Office spokesman said Wednesday. "They told us they were not raped or assaulted and they said they were safe and well," the spokesman said. Nawal Bel Hadj, 24, said Monday in Amman, Jordan, that she had seen Iraqi troops rape five Kuwaiti Airlines stewardesses--two Britons, two Egyptians and a Filipina--in a hostel in Kuwait city on Aug.
NEWS
August 12, 1990 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
With communications blacked out, the anguish of occupied Kuwait seeps out only in small bits of diplomatic intelligence, refugee accounts and rare press reports. The assembled portrait is grim. Iraq's military machine, a force estimated at 120,000 in Kuwait, has the country in an iron grip. But wild ill-discipline among the ranks has terrorized the populace and washed Saddam Hussein's vaunted army with a dark stain.
NEWS
August 16, 1990 | Reuters
Two British airline flight attendants have denied a Tunisian colleague's assertion that they were raped by Iraqi soldiers in Kuwait, a Foreign Office spokesman said Wednesday. "They told us they were not raped or assaulted and they said they were safe and well," the spokesman said. Nawal Bel Hadj, 24, said Monday in Amman, Jordan, that she had seen Iraqi troops rape five Kuwaiti Airlines stewardesses--two Britons, two Egyptians and a Filipina--in a hostel in Kuwait city on Aug.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1991
McCarthy's article was close to treason for giving Iraq ammunition in the propaganda war. Calling U.S. pilot cowards, as he sits behind a typewriter while the pilots are risking their lives, he is writing untruths, not substantiated propaganda. Never once did he mention the rape of Kuwait, the gassing of Kurds, the Scud missiles fired into populated places like Israel and Saudi Arabia. McCarthy is giving aid and comfort to the enemy and should be held responsible for his acts.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1991
In response to several letters to the editor (Jan. 22), I would like to say that many of us who oppose this war have been protesting for peace and justice in many other situations. I question why George Bush is not doing the same. Many of us who protest this war have become angry at the lack of concern he shows toward the vast numbers of social problems plaguing our society.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1990
The bloodless way out of the Persian Gulf crisis is not to pay Arab nations to send troops to Saudi Arabia or to exhort Saudi Arabia to pay for troops, but to refuse to defend Saudi Arabian oil unless the Saudis and other Arab oil-producing nations, excluding Iraq, pledge to lower the price per barrel of oil, until Iraq can no longer finance its military complex. If the oil-producing states in the Mideast want defense, let them subsidize it with reduced oil prices. The threat of war increases with each rise in prices; the rise in oil prices results when the oil industry fears the outbreak of war. This creates a negative spiral towards war. We must break it by demanding lower oil prices.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1990
For many Israelis, the United Nations is little more than a house of cards, with the cards invariably stacked against them. Nothing that happened this past week will soften that dismissive view. Start with the Security Council resolution that condemned Israel for its police action against Arabs at the Temple Mount that left at least 19 Palestinians dead. Move on to the effort to force an on-site investigatory team down Israel's throat. Israelis don't expect to get a fair shake from the U.N.
NEWS
August 14, 1990 | Reuters
An airline flight attendant who reached Jordan on Monday said Iraqi troops stormed into a hostel in Kuwait city and raped five Kuwait Airlines flight attendants--two Britons, two Egyptians and a Filipina. Nawal Bel Hadj, 24, of Tunisia, said in an interview that she witnessed the attacks Aug. 7, five days after Iraq invaded Kuwait. "Eight Iraqi soldiers holding machine guns stormed our hostel," she said. "First, they asked our Indian servant for water.
NEWS
August 12, 1990 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
With communications blacked out, the anguish of occupied Kuwait seeps out only in small bits of diplomatic intelligence, refugee accounts and rare press reports. The assembled portrait is grim. Iraq's military machine, a force estimated at 120,000 in Kuwait, has the country in an iron grip. But wild ill-discipline among the ranks has terrorized the populace and washed Saddam Hussein's vaunted army with a dark stain.
NEWS
October 30, 1990 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a hint that the Bush Administration may be considering some new action soon against Iraq, Secretary of State James A. Baker III warned Monday that "Saddam Hussein must realize there is a limit to the international community's patience." Baker, in a toughly worded speech to the Los Angeles World Affairs Council, repeatedly emphasized that the United States may have to resort to military action in the Persian Gulf. "All options are being considered," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1990 | EDWIN M. YODER JR., Edwin M. Yoder Jr. writes a syndicated column in Washington. and
At slamming barn doors behind escaped horses--and imputing blame for the escape to the wrong parties--the Congress of the United States knows few peers, now as in years long past. Witness the emergence of the "Who lost Kuwait?" inquisition. A week or so ago, the Iraqi government mischievously leaked a bugged transcript of Saddam Hussein's parting interview of July 25 with April Glaspie, U.S. ambassador to Baghdad.
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