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NEWS
April 15, 1997 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A succession of women made public for the first time Monday their accusations against the noncommissioned officer portrayed as the worst offender in the Army's widening sex scandal, but their testimony may have inflicted its heaviest damage on the reputation of the service itself. As they described rapes and assaults allegedly committed by Staff Sgt. Delmar G.
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NEWS
October 25, 1998 | AMY ARGETSINGER, WASHINGTON POST
No one even realized that Wayne and Tina were a couple until things had gotten pretty serious. Her family was upset, of course, when she told them she was pregnant. But they had grown to like Wayne, and Wayne had promised to stick by Tina. So, with her parents' blessings, they went to the county courthouse, her belly bulging at eight months, and vowed to spend the rest of their lives together.
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NEWS
April 25, 1997 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a court-martial jury began deliberating the principal case in the Army's sexual-misconduct scandal, an attorney for the accused drill sergeant warned Thursday that a rape conviction would invite a flood of unfounded sex harassment charges from women and destroy Army discipline. An attorney for Staff Sgt.
NEWS
August 15, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Army dropped rape charges against a drill sergeant, reducing to one the number of soldiers successfully prosecuted for rape in the Army's investigation of sexual misconduct at Aberdeen Proving Ground. Military prosecutors also announced that they were dismissing several other charges against Staff Sgt. Herman Gunter, 30.
NEWS
June 26, 1997 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A married Army sergeant charged Wednesday that the Army's chief enlisted man carried on a furtive relationship with her, then sexually assaulted her in his home while she was eight and a half months pregnant. Appearing before an Army pre-trial hearing, Sgt. Christine Roy described how Gene C. McKinney, the sergeant major of the Army, had befriended her at a golf tournament, then four months later committed an act that made her "feel like trash--I felt used."
NEWS
April 19, 1997 | From Associated Press
A military judge ruled Friday that drill sergeants have so much power over trainees that they don't need to use a weapon or threaten force to be found guilty of rape. In a major setback for the defense in the court-martial of Staff Sgt. Delmar Simpson, the judge further stated that the women need not resist or object. The judge, Col.
NEWS
November 14, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
A drill sergeant who had sex with three female recruits got five months in prison and a bad-conduct discharge Wednesday in the first sentencing stemming from the burgeoning Army sex scandal. Sgt. Loren B. Taylor, 29, pleaded guilty a day earlier to breaking the ban on sex between commanders and subordinates, having consensual sex with three female recruits and trying to have sex with another. Two other instructors at Ft. Leonard Wood face similar charges.
NEWS
April 30, 1997 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Army drill sergeant was found guilty Tuesday of 18 counts of rape against six women in the cornerstone case of the military's sexual-misconduct scandal. Staff Sgt. Delmar G. Simpson, 32, faces a maximum of life in prison for each rape count. His ultimate sentence is difficult to predict, however, legal experts said, because of the wide latitude military appeals courts have in reconsidering jury judgments.
NEWS
March 14, 1997 | Associated Press
The Army's inspector general will review the outcome of sexual harassment cases that touched off accusations of misconduct on the part of the Army's own investigators, the service's top civilian leader promised lawmakers Thursday. Army Secretary Togo West sought to assure members of a House National Security subcommittee that the military justice system can fairly investigate all issues in cases alleging sexual harassment.
NEWS
June 27, 1997 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Attorneys for the Army's top enlisted man Thursday began building their rebuttal to charges by a woman who has accused him of sexual misconduct, portraying her as a disappointed job seeker trying to sell a deeply flawed tale. In an Army pretrial hearing, lawyers for Sgt. Major of the Army Gene C. McKinney attempted to establish that Sgt. Christine Roy's allegations were aimed at exacting revenge for McKinney's failure to deliver a staff job that he had once promised her.
NEWS
June 26, 1997 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A married Army sergeant charged Wednesday that the Army's chief enlisted man carried on a furtive relationship with her, then sexually assaulted her in his home while she was eight and a half months pregnant. Appearing before an Army pre-trial hearing, Sgt. Christine Roy described how Gene C. McKinney, the sergeant major of the Army, had befriended her at a golf tournament, then four months later committed an act that made her "feel like trash--I felt used."
NEWS
May 28, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Army prosecutors dropped the final rape charge in a wide-ranging investigation of sexual misconduct at the Aberdeen Proving Ground. Although the charge against Staff Sgt. Vernell Robinson Jr. was dropped, the Ordnance Center and School trainer faces a court-martial on 20 other counts including indecent assault, adultery and communicating a threat.
NEWS
May 8, 1997 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Army's sexual misconduct scandal reached higher into the service Wednesday as the top-ranking enlisted soldier was formally charged with 18 violations alleging sexual misconduct with four women. Coming one day after an Army drill sergeant was sentenced to 25 years in prison for rape and other sexual misconduct with female trainees, the case against Sergeant Major of the Army Gene C. McKinney promises to be another explosive mixture of sex and race.
NEWS
May 6, 1997 | From Associated Press
A drill sergeant facing life in prison for raping six female trainees apologized to his victims and his family Monday. "After I started down this path, I became blind to my inability to live by the moral values I learned from childhood," Staff Sgt. Delmar Simpson said. Simpson apologized to his wife, Juliet, his fellow drill sergeants and his victims. "I apologize to the trainees who believe I brought them harm," he said. "I was your drill sergeant, and I failed you."
NEWS
April 30, 1997 | HEATHER KNIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twenty women who claim they were raped or sexually harassed while serving in the military joined two congresswomen Tuesday to call for a civilian commission to investigate sexual misconduct in the nation's armed forces.
SPORTS
March 1, 1991
A Maryland prosecutor said he has decided against trying former San Antonio guard David Wingate for rape because the complainant no longer wants to press charges. The Spurs said they will decide in about a week whether to re-sign Wingate.
NEWS
April 30, 1997 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Army drill sergeant was found guilty Tuesday of 18 counts of rape against six women in the cornerstone case of the military's sexual-misconduct scandal. Staff Sgt. Delmar G. Simpson, 32, faces a maximum of life in prison for each rape count. His ultimate sentence is difficult to predict, however, legal experts said, because of the wide latitude military appeals courts have in reconsidering jury judgments.
NEWS
April 26, 1997 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A court-martial jury will soon decide the fate of the central figure in the Army's Aberdeen sexual misconduct case, yet that verdict will leave unanswered a far more urgent question: Where were the officers when the military's worst sex scandal was taking shape? In eight days of testimony about accused rapist Staff Sgt. Delmar G.
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