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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 2002 | Anna Gorman, Times Staff Writer
Nurse practitioners at the Rape Treatment Center in Santa Monica take digital photographs of victims' injuries and analyze slides with a high-definition microscope. They use state-of-the art technology to examine sexual assault victims and then present comprehensive rape kits to police investigators. Unusual for its advanced forensic capabilities, the nonprofit facility serves more than 1,000 victims a year, offering free medical treatment, professional counseling and legal assistance.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 2004 | Andrew Blankstein, Times Staff Writer
In few areas of policing is time more important than in the investigation of sex crimes. Any hesitation can mean a change of heart by traumatized victims, the compromise of valuable DNA evidence or the failure to identify a rapist or child molester who may strike again. But too often at the Los Angeles Police Department, precious hours slipped by as detectives waited -- and waited -- for the necessary tools to secure, gather and process crime scene evidence. Police Lt.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1999
The Rape Treatment Center at Santa Monica-UCLA Medical Center opened an emergency care facility Wednesday that will provide free 24-hour medical help. Authorities said the faster medical care, and gathering of evidence, could lead to more successful prosecutions of rape cases.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 2003 | Andrew Blankstein, Times Staff Writer
When FBI Special Agent Douglas Hunt launches into his presentation to teach parents how to protect their children from Internet predators, it isn't long before polite smiles give way to audible gasps and expressions of jaw-dropping disbelief. He begins with the case of a Santa Clarita man who contacted a 13-year-old boy in an online chat room. After graduating to instant-message exchanges, the man told investigators, he began sending the boy e-mails with sexually explicit attachments.
NEWS
June 16, 1991 | CHRISTINA V. GODBEY
Nearly 20 years ago, Gail Abarbanel joined the staff at Santa Monica Hospital as a social worker. Now the director of the Rape Treatment Center for the hospital, she was recently honored by President Bush and Atty. Gen. Dick Thornburgh at a White House ceremony for her contributions in assisting victims of crime. Abarbanel said that in her early years at the hospital, there were no established programs to help treat rape victims.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1997 | ABIGAIL GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hotline phones keep ringing at the Rape Treatment Center in Santa Monica. Counseling sessions for rape survivors fill up quickly. Traumatized women, many just hours after being sexually violated, continue showing up at the hospital emergency room just down the corridor from the center. Recently released FBI crime statistics indicate that the number of forcible rapes nationally and locally has declined along with homicides and robberies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 2003 | Andrew Blankstein, Times Staff Writer
When FBI Special Agent Douglas Hunt launches into his presentation to teach parents how to protect their children from Internet predators, it isn't long before polite smiles give way to audible gasps and expressions of jaw-dropping disbelief. He begins with the case of a Santa Clarita man who contacted a 13-year-old boy in an online chat room. After graduating to instant-message exchanges, the man told investigators, he began sending the boy e-mails with sexually explicit attachments.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 2004 | Andrew Blankstein, Times Staff Writer
In few areas of policing is time more important than in the investigation of sex crimes. Any hesitation can mean a change of heart by traumatized victims, the compromise of valuable DNA evidence or the failure to identify a rapist or child molester who may strike again. But too often at the Los Angeles Police Department, precious hours slipped by as detectives waited -- and waited -- for the necessary tools to secure, gather and process crime scene evidence. Police Lt.
HEALTH
January 15, 2001 | JANE E. ALLEN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
After she was raped in her bed by a man with a knife, Patti Lancaster felt paralyzed by fear, unsure how she'd make it through each day. "I felt everything I had been was gone," she recalls. "I wanted out of my life." She found refuge a few miles away at the Rape Treatment Center at Santa Monica-UCLA Medical Center. From the moment she entered the center's private waiting room, far from the chaos of emergency patients, she felt protected. No one rushed her.
NEWS
October 9, 1994 | ROBIN ABCARIAN
She sat on the end of the riser, facing 500 people under an immense white garden party tent on the lawn of a fabulous canyon estate. She had a glamorous look about her--she wore a short creamy suit with clunky boots, and her short hair was crimped and oiled and combed straight back off a face that was luminous--angelic even. She had that Beverly Hills aura: gorgeous, privileged, pampered. A stranger, you would guess, to suffering of any magnitude greater than a broken nail.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 2002 | Anna Gorman, Times Staff Writer
Nurse practitioners at the Rape Treatment Center in Santa Monica take digital photographs of victims' injuries and analyze slides with a high-definition microscope. They use state-of-the art technology to examine sexual assault victims and then present comprehensive rape kits to police investigators. Unusual for its advanced forensic capabilities, the nonprofit facility serves more than 1,000 victims a year, offering free medical treatment, professional counseling and legal assistance.
HEALTH
January 15, 2001 | JANE E. ALLEN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
After she was raped in her bed by a man with a knife, Patti Lancaster felt paralyzed by fear, unsure how she'd make it through each day. "I felt everything I had been was gone," she recalls. "I wanted out of my life." She found refuge a few miles away at the Rape Treatment Center at Santa Monica-UCLA Medical Center. From the moment she entered the center's private waiting room, far from the chaos of emergency patients, she felt protected. No one rushed her.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1999
The Rape Treatment Center at Santa Monica-UCLA Medical Center opened an emergency care facility Wednesday that will provide free 24-hour medical help. Authorities said the faster medical care, and gathering of evidence, could lead to more successful prosecutions of rape cases.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1997 | ABIGAIL GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hotline phones keep ringing at the Rape Treatment Center in Santa Monica. Counseling sessions for rape survivors fill up quickly. Traumatized women, many just hours after being sexually violated, continue showing up at the hospital emergency room just down the corridor from the center. Recently released FBI crime statistics indicate that the number of forcible rapes nationally and locally has declined along with homicides and robberies.
NEWS
June 16, 1991 | CHRISTINA V. GODBEY
Nearly 20 years ago, Gail Abarbanel joined the staff at Santa Monica Hospital as a social worker. Now the director of the Rape Treatment Center for the hospital, she was recently honored by President Bush and Atty. Gen. Dick Thornburgh at a White House ceremony for her contributions in assisting victims of crime. Abarbanel said that in her early years at the hospital, there were no established programs to help treat rape victims.
MAGAZINE
October 26, 1997
The cast of "NYPD Blue" hosted the annual brunch benefiting the Rape Treatment Center of the Santa Monica-UCLA Medical Center and Stuart House, a program for child victims of rape. Held at the Beverly Hills home of philanthropists Ron and Janet Burkle, the event raised $450,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Rape counselors say there is a significant increase this year in the number of women being severely beaten during a rape. Most of the victims were raped and beaten by their spouses or boyfriends, said Marilyn Lewis, director of the San Francisco Rape Treatment Center at San Francisco General Hospital. During the first five months of the year, 13 people required hospitalization after being raped and beaten. There were 10 such cases in the city all of last year, Lewis said.
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