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Raphael Cordero

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NEWS
January 23, 1992 | MICHAEL QUINTANILLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Raphael Cordero points to walls filled with blown-up photographs--faces of people 100 years old and older. He was a teacher, a giver and a helper to these aged friends. Every day, for seven years, he visited their homes and convalescent centers, taking them flowers or clothing. He played the piano for them. He carried their fragile bodies out of wheelchairs and into bed. He took them on joy rides across Los Angeles and to birthday dinners at fancy hotels.
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NEWS
December 31, 1992 | MICHAEL QUINTANILLA
It's her California friends--her "new family"--Carmen Marsach misses most now that she is home in Puerto Rico. "Those people made many dreams come true for my son," says Marsach, whose son, Raphael Cordero, 40, died of AIDS last June after a two-year battle (View, July 5). Marsach had left Dorado, Puerto Rico, for Burbank to care for her son, founder of the American Centenarian Committee that befriends 100-year-olds throughout Southern California. Cordero often played the piano for his friends and made their birthday wishes come true.
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NEWS
August 7, 1992
I have been wandering around all day trying to find words to express how deeply your article about Raphael Cordero touched me. I haven't had much luck. I sat at the table and wept for 10 minutes after I finished it. I called several friends and told them to read it. Two of them called me back when they'd finished, both of them in tears. I've had two friends die of AIDS and I have another friend afraid to be tested, who lives his days now in constant terror. I have thought for a long time now that I wanted to become actively involved in the fight against AIDS and for greater acceptance in general of gays and lesbians.
NEWS
August 7, 1992
I have been wandering around all day trying to find words to express how deeply your article about Raphael Cordero touched me. I haven't had much luck. I sat at the table and wept for 10 minutes after I finished it. I called several friends and told them to read it. Two of them called me back when they'd finished, both of them in tears. I've had two friends die of AIDS and I have another friend afraid to be tested, who lives his days now in constant terror. I have thought for a long time now that I wanted to become actively involved in the fight against AIDS and for greater acceptance in general of gays and lesbians.
NEWS
December 31, 1992 | MICHAEL QUINTANILLA
It's her California friends--her "new family"--Carmen Marsach misses most now that she is home in Puerto Rico. "Those people made many dreams come true for my son," says Marsach, whose son, Raphael Cordero, 40, died of AIDS last June after a two-year battle (View, July 5). Marsach had left Dorado, Puerto Rico, for Burbank to care for her son, founder of the American Centenarian Committee that befriends 100-year-olds throughout Southern California. Cordero often played the piano for his friends and made their birthday wishes come true.
NEWS
June 25, 1992
Raphael O. Cordero II, co-founder and executive director of the American Centenarian Committee, an organization that honors the aged, died Monday of AIDS complications. For the last seven years, Cordero, 40, worked as a full-time volunteer for the Burbank-based ACC, visiting senior citizens at nursing homes and convalescent centers. He started an annual American Centenarian Day luncheon that honors the aged and worked to dispel stereotypes associated with the elderly.
NEWS
March 2, 1992
The piece on Raphael Cordero touched my heart. My own grandpa lived to the age of 102. Grandpa taught me many things, but the most important was probably: Don't sweat the small stuff. If I can spend $10 on a football pool, certainly I can match that amount on Cordero's effort to organize the luncheon planned for May 20th for the centenarians. Where do I send a check? MARY FANNIEN NOWAK, Los Angeles Raphael Cordero reports that enough money has been raised for the centenarian luncheon . He says cards and letters have lifted his spirits and he would appreciate hearing from readers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1987
Computers, presumably, are no mystery to Raphael Cordero either. The 36-year-old former programmer who says he once was known as "Computer Whiz Kid to the Stars," heads the Burbank-based American Centenarian Committee, a nonprofit organization to help people 100 or older "interface with the community." By that, Cordero said, he means to get them outside the convalescent hospitals once in a while and let them be part of the real world again through the Adopt a Centenarian Program.
NEWS
June 1, 1995 | MICHAEL QUINTANILLA
In 1992, after three years of choreographing his dream dance piece--to the strains of Gustav Mahler's Symphony No. 3 --Francisco Martinez still had no title for his work and that was holding him back. Then he read about Raphael Cordero, a man with AIDS who had developed a friendship with Times reporter Michael Quintanilla. Quintanilla chronicled Cordero's last six months of life in a diary that was later published in The Times ("I Took a Look at My Soul the Other Day," View, July 5, 1992).
NEWS
June 25, 1992
Raphael O. Cordero II, co-founder and executive director of the American Centenarian Committee, an organization that honors the aged, died Monday of AIDS complications. For the last seven years, Cordero, 40, worked as a full-time volunteer for the Burbank-based ACC, visiting senior citizens at nursing homes and convalescent centers. He started an annual American Centenarian Day luncheon that honors the aged and worked to dispel stereotypes associated with the elderly.
NEWS
January 23, 1992 | MICHAEL QUINTANILLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Raphael Cordero points to walls filled with blown-up photographs--faces of people 100 years old and older. He was a teacher, a giver and a helper to these aged friends. Every day, for seven years, he visited their homes and convalescent centers, taking them flowers or clothing. He played the piano for them. He carried their fragile bodies out of wheelchairs and into bed. He took them on joy rides across Los Angeles and to birthday dinners at fancy hotels.
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