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Rapid Prototyping

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BUSINESS
July 13, 1997 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To the list of industries for which Southern California is the undisputed capital, add a new one. It's not as flashy as movies or as lucrative as bank robberies, and you've probably never heard of it. But the Southland is home to the leading companies in a new and growing field: rapid prototyping.
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NEWS
September 6, 2001 | DAVE WILSON, dave.wilson@latimes.com
The replicator is perhaps the coolest bit of technology in the "Star Trek" universe. Just tell the computer what you want, be it animal, vegetable or mineral. Then the replicator converts energy into matter, instantly producing your heart's desire. Replicators don't exist--yet--but something pretty close is in use at factories around the world. Rapid prototyping machines can produce remarkably complex and detailed objects based on computer descriptions.
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NEWS
September 6, 2001 | DAVE WILSON, dave.wilson@latimes.com
The replicator is perhaps the coolest bit of technology in the "Star Trek" universe. Just tell the computer what you want, be it animal, vegetable or mineral. Then the replicator converts energy into matter, instantly producing your heart's desire. Replicators don't exist--yet--but something pretty close is in use at factories around the world. Rapid prototyping machines can produce remarkably complex and detailed objects based on computer descriptions.
BUSINESS
July 13, 1997 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To the list of industries for which Southern California is the undisputed capital, add a new one. It's not as flashy as movies or as lucrative as bank robberies, and you've probably never heard of it. But the Southland is home to the leading companies in a new and growing field: rapid prototyping.
BUSINESS
December 27, 1994 | JENNIFER PENDLETON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In 1992, Logitech Inc., a computer peripherals maker, had a chance to win a big contract from IBM. The computer giant needed to produce a two-button computer mouse in a hurry. IBM gave Logitech a two-week deadline to come up with a working model and a price to mass produce the part. So Logitech turned to an unusual model-making machine it had purchased from 3D Systems Corp. in Valencia.
BUSINESS
September 23, 1997
3D Systems Corp. said Monday that it has completed its $3.25-million acquisition of a rapid prototyping product line from EOS GmbH of Germany, its major competitor in Europe. 3D, which is a Valencia-based supplier of solid-imaging systems, will also grant EOS exclusive licenses to its laser patents.
BUSINESS
December 28, 1993
3D Systems Corp., a Valencia-based maker of computer-imaging systems, said Texas Instruments Defense Systems & Electronics Group has agreed to buy two of 3D Systems' top-of-the-line systems valued at $940,000. 3D Systems' product, like other solid-imaging systems, uses what is called stereolithography technology to produce rapid prototyping, used by companies to design and manufacture parts.
BUSINESS
September 2, 1997
3D Systems Corp. has agreed to acquire the rapid prototyping "Stereos" product line and business from EOS GmbH of Germany, 3D's major European competitor, the Valencia-based company said. Additionally, under the terms of the agreement 3D would settle all patent infringement and unfair competition lawsuits brought in 1993 and 1994 against EOS and an EOS customer, as well as all patent office proceedings between the two companies. 3D will pay $3.
BUSINESS
April 26, 1999 | KAREN KAPLAN
A team of engineers at USC's Information Sciences Institute has built what may be the world's narrowest metal chain--as slim as about five human hairs. But the most remarkable thing about the chain is not its size, but the process used to build it. Microelectrical mechanical devices, or MEMS, like the tiny chain are usually produced in so-called clean rooms. But the USC team has devised a less expensive way to make tiny devices.
BUSINESS
June 14, 1995 | KATHLEEN WIEGNER
Purdue University foods and nutrition professor Martha Belury thinks that the time has come to give cheeseburgers some respect. Ever since researchers found a relationship between dietary fat and cancer, red meat and cheese have been cast in the role of bad guys. But Belury, working out of the West Lafayette, Ind.
BUSINESS
December 27, 1994 | JENNIFER PENDLETON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In 1992, Logitech Inc., a computer peripherals maker, had a chance to win a big contract from IBM. The computer giant needed to produce a two-button computer mouse in a hurry. IBM gave Logitech a two-week deadline to come up with a working model and a price to mass produce the part. So Logitech turned to an unusual model-making machine it had purchased from 3D Systems Corp. in Valencia.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2007 | Alex Chun
FOR more than 40 years, Robert Graham has created provocative figurative works, relying on live models as inspiration. So in describing his latest exhibition at the USC Fisher Gallery -- more than 100 paintings and sculptures of the female form, all spawned from small clay figures created by hand in a matter of seconds, then recast in bronze and silver -- he says paradoxically, "It's actually the same work I've always been doing, only it's different."
NEWS
August 11, 2012 | By Craig Nakano
When the L.A. design firm Commune shared photos of its new pop-up in Japan -- a traveling shop and cafe featuring collaborations with Heath Ceramics and"Beginners" director and artist Mike Mills, among others -- what initially caught our eye weren't Mills' limited-edition prints, which are great, but rather a series of fingerprint graphics lining one wall. It turns out the prints in question belong to the thumb of Bauhaus artist Herbert Bayer. Commune uses the thumbprint as a maker's mark, its signature "for anything we do that is handcrafted," Roman Alonso, a partner in the firm, said via email in response to our inquiry.
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