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BUSINESS
August 1, 2003 | Chuck Philips, Times Staff Writer
Someone is gunning for Marion "Suge" Knight. The head of Death Row Records grew famous glamorizing gang violence. He called his artists "inmates." His company logo depicted a hooded convict strapped into an electric chair. His producers grafted violent lyrics onto driving rhythms, punctuated by shotgun blasts and wailing sirens. That was make-believe mayhem. Now, Knight is being stalked by the real thing.
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BUSINESS
September 6, 2002 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The city's neon lights vibrated in the polished hood of the black BMW as it cruised up Las Vegas Boulevard. The man in the passenger seat was instantly recognizable. Fans lined the streets, waving, snapping photos, begging Tupac Shakur for his autograph. Cops were everywhere, smiling. The BMW 750 sedan, with rap magnate Marion "Suge" Knight at the wheel, was leading a procession of luxury vehicles past the MGM Grand Hotel and Caesars Palace, on their way to a hot new nightclub.
NEWS
November 25, 1990 | SUE MARTIN
THE SHOW: "Fresh Prince of Bel-Air"(NBC, Mondays, 8 p.m.) THE SETUP: Will Smith plays "the Fresh Prince" (also his real-life rap moniker), a kid from a tough Philly neighborhood whose parents send him to live with his well-to-do uncle Philip Banks (James Avery) and his family in Bel-Air. The frequent clashes between the young rapper and the upper-crust set provide sparks. And also some smooth dance steps.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1994
Years ago Woody Guthrie used the traditional format of the "Talking Blues" to create "Talking Dust," "Talking Merchant Marine," "Talking Constitution" to express his anti-Establishment views. Later, Vern Partlow wrote "Old Man Atom," which ended with ". . . peace on the Earth or the Earth in pieces." Since then, many folk singers have used the format to express their own critiques of society--the Vietnam War, the population explosion--with great effect. Notably, these songs have been absent from the airwaves as "subversive" and "radical."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1995 | CHUCK PHILIPS and FRANK B. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Even before AIDS-stricken rap star Eric (Eazy-E) Wright was laid to rest earlier this month, Wright's former lovers and business associates were haggling in Los Angeles Superior Court for control over his dwindling fortune. "It's sad and it's shocking," said the rapper's 26-year-old widow, Tomica Woods Wright, who has a year-old child by Wright and is pregnant with another, due in September. "A lot of people who claim to know (Wright) really didn't.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1995 | JERRY CROWE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The D.O.C. was riding high, literally and figuratively, as he drove his brand-new sports car west on the Ventura Freeway toward his Calabasas home late one November night in 1989. Only a day before, the promising rapper with a seemingly limitless future had completed work on a video for his just-released debut album, a work that would eventually sell more than 1 million copies. Celebrating, he had spent the night partying with a girlfriend. "I was the [best]," the D.O.C. says.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 2009 | Sam Quinones, Rong-Gong Lin II and Andrew Blankstein
An Atlanta-based rapper was fatally shot in the valet waiting area of the Beverly Center mall Monday by a suspect who fled in a silver Mercedes SUV, according to police. Officers later detained a "person of interest" as he approached the ticketing area at Los Angeles International Airport armed with a gun. The shooting occurred about 3:10 p.m. in the parking garage of the popular Westside mall, sending diners in nearby restaurants diving for cover.
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