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ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2013 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Three years after the end of "Lost," Damon Lindelof is heading back to TV with a new series titled "The Leftovers. " HBO announced Monday that it had ordered a 10-episode first season of the series, to be run by Lindelof, the co-creator and co-showrunner of the classic ABC fantasy adventure series. While the series, based on the novel by Tom Perotta, has a fantasy bent to it, this one won't have the flavor of island adventure. PHOTOS: Hollywood Backlot moments The story revolves around the people left on Earth after the Rapture whisks all the true believers off to Heaven.
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NEWS
April 15, 2014 | By Paul Whitefield
Stayed up well past my bedtime Monday night to catch the “blood moon.” Wish I would've known that it was a sign of the apocalypse - I might have lingered a little longer. What's that? You didn't know either? That's OK - that's why God (or Al Gore) invented the Internet. Sarah Pulliam Bailey has the particulars over at Religion News Service in her story , “ 'Blood moon' sets off apocalyptic debate among some Christians.” Full disclosure: I mostly skipped Sunday school.
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BUSINESS
May 19, 2011 | By Abby Sewell, Los Angeles Times
Natalie Jones said the idea of paying someone to send emails to her loved ones after the "rapture" would have seemed preposterous to her a few years ago. That was before the occupational health therapist and mother of two in Surrey, Britain, became a born-again Christian. She now believes the faithful will be swept up in the skies to unite with Jesus in the rapture, while nonbelievers will be left behind to wait for Armageddon and the second coming of Christ. Eight months ago, Jones paid $14.95 to a website called You've Been Left Behind to send letters to nonbelieving loved ones in the event she is taken away in the rapture.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 2013 | Mitchell Landsberg
Harold Camping didn't live to see the end of the world. The Oakland-based radio preacher, who died Sunday, drew international attention, much of it in the form of ridicule, when he predicted - more than once - the precise date of the Rapture and then had to concede his error. He was 92. Camping died at his home in Alameda after suffering a fall last month, according to a statement from his Family Radio Network . Convinced that he had unlocked hidden clues in the Bible, Camping predicted the end of the world no fewer than 12 times, beginning in 1978, according to an aide, and was persistent in the face of his repeated failures.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2013 | By Margaret Gray
In “God's Gypsy,” now at the Lillian Theatre, playwright and performer Coco Blignaut dramatizes the life of St. Teresa of Ávila, the 16th-century Spanish nun known for her ecstatic visions (the most famous starred a handsome angel who pierced her heart with a flaming sword). Targeted by the Spanish Inquisition and accused of blasphemy, hysteria and demonic possession, she nonetheless persevered in reforming the Carmelite order and establishing monasteries around the world.  This world premiere begins with appropriately bliss-inducing original music by violinist/vocalist/composer Lili Haydn (who performed live on opening night)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2012 | By Glenn Whipp
Paul Thomas Anderson's highly anticipated “The Master” screened for the second time publicly last night in Chicago at a hastily arranged benefit for the nonprofit Film Foundation. And the immediate reactions - rapture, admiration, befuddlement - mirrored those following the film's pop-up presentation at Santa Monica's Aero Theatre on Aug. 3. Then again, as A.V. Club film critic Scott Tobias, who saw the movie at Chicago's Music Box last night, tweeted: “One more thing about 'The Master:' It's comically resistant to instant reaction.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2002 | Daniel Cariaga, Times Staff Writer
This is, indeed, a golden age of violinists. At a masterly 31, the Japanese-born Midori stands as the leader -- actually the groundbreaker -- of its younger generation. On Wednesday night, Midori began the second week of her current Los Angeles Philharmonic residency in the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, playing the once-neglected, now-ubiquitous Violin Concerto by Samuel Barber.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2013 | By Celine Wright
  Actress Amy Brenneman said that a friend who read the script for Gina Gionfriddo's play "Rapture, Blister, Burn" told her the part seemed to be written for her. Brenneman, who is recognizable from the TV shows "Private Practice" and "Judging Amy," plays Catherine Croll, a fortysomething, successful, single academic who is trying to figure out why she feels unfulfilled in her personal life. The play opens Wednesday at the Geffen Playhouse. Though the character of Catharine is an author with titles such as "Women Always Call Free: Pornography and the Corruption of American Feminism" on her resume, her personal life doesn't feel as accomplished, and she still lusts after an old boyfriend.
NEWS
May 20, 2011 | By Catharine Hamm, Los Angeles Times Travel editor
I don’t know what you can take with you for the "rapture ," which some people believe will happen Saturday, but I do know there are things you can’t take with you on an airplane (and one thing I didn’t know about). And now, the owners of these objects know that too. In recent, separate incidents at John Wayne Airport (SNA) in Orange County,  would-be passengers were found to be carrying a loaded Smith & Wesson .38 Special; a round of .22-caliber ammunition; some throwing stars; and a shotgun barrel, the Transportation Security Administration said.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2011 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
THE LEFTOVERS A Novel Tom Perrotta St. Martin's Press: 356 pp., $25.99 The two most moving scenes in Tom Perrotta's sixth novel, "The Leftovers," come late in the book. In the first, Kevin Garvey - abandoned husband, distracted father, mayor of the affluent suburb of Mapleton - tells a woman he's been dating that he's just heard from his college-age son for the first time in months. "Were you close?" she asks, herself a bit distracted. "He was my little boy, I was always so proud of him," Kevin answers and bursts into tears.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2013 | By Margaret Gray
In “God's Gypsy,” now at the Lillian Theatre, playwright and performer Coco Blignaut dramatizes the life of St. Teresa of Ávila, the 16th-century Spanish nun known for her ecstatic visions (the most famous starred a handsome angel who pierced her heart with a flaming sword). Targeted by the Spanish Inquisition and accused of blasphemy, hysteria and demonic possession, she nonetheless persevered in reforming the Carmelite order and establishing monasteries around the world.  This world premiere begins with appropriately bliss-inducing original music by violinist/vocalist/composer Lili Haydn (who performed live on opening night)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
There is an anecdote about Einstein from when he taught at Caltech in the early 1930s. One day, pianist and Beethoven specialist Artur Schnabel came to visit the famed physicist, who was an avid amateur violinist, and they read through a Beethoven violin sonata. It didn't go well. Fumbling a tricky rhythm, Einstein got lost, and Schnabel exclaimed in frustration, "Albert, you can't count!" I have no idea how true this is (there are variants of the story), but what matters is that 80 years later, Einstein counted at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, and it was a momentous event.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2013 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Three years after the end of "Lost," Damon Lindelof is heading back to TV with a new series titled "The Leftovers. " HBO announced Monday that it had ordered a 10-episode first season of the series, to be run by Lindelof, the co-creator and co-showrunner of the classic ABC fantasy adventure series. While the series, based on the novel by Tom Perotta, has a fantasy bent to it, this one won't have the flavor of island adventure. PHOTOS: Hollywood Backlot moments The story revolves around the people left on Earth after the Rapture whisks all the true believers off to Heaven.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2013 | By Celine Wright
  Actress Amy Brenneman said that a friend who read the script for Gina Gionfriddo's play "Rapture, Blister, Burn" told her the part seemed to be written for her. Brenneman, who is recognizable from the TV shows "Private Practice" and "Judging Amy," plays Catherine Croll, a fortysomething, successful, single academic who is trying to figure out why she feels unfulfilled in her personal life. The play opens Wednesday at the Geffen Playhouse. Though the character of Catharine is an author with titles such as "Women Always Call Free: Pornography and the Corruption of American Feminism" on her resume, her personal life doesn't feel as accomplished, and she still lusts after an old boyfriend.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2013 | By Amy Nicholson
Don't believe the based-on-a-true-story opening disclaimer of Paul Middleditch's comedy "Rapture-Palooza. " The Apocalypse hasn't happened - yet. But mankind could do worse than being lorded over by Craig Robinson's Antichrist, a swaggering sex fiend, Vin Diesel fan and former mayoral candidate of Boise, Idaho, who dresses like the second coming of Arsenio Hall. With the plot already spoiled by the Book of Revelations, Chris Matheson's script focuses its energy on small, wickedly funny gags, half of which Robinson seems to have sputtered out as improv.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2013 | By David Ng
New and recent plays by Donald Margulies and Gina Gionfriddo will highlight the 2013-14 season at the Geffen Playhouse. The season also will include performances by actors Amy Brenneman and William Petersen, as well as a Harold Pinter play directed by Oscar-winning director William Friedkin. The Geffen will present nine productions for the season, one more than the current season. Randall Arney, the company's artistic director, said in an interview that he wanted to achieve "a balance between new plays, recent plays and classic works.
NEWS
August 13, 1992
Re "Is The End Near?" (July 30, 1992): Drivers may disappear at any time? Give me a break! The freeways are dangerous enough already! Christians who really believe in the Rapture should have a "designated sinner" in the car with them at all times! CHRISTINE A. LEHMAN Los Angeles
BOOKS
January 17, 1993
I have never read a more pompous, condescending review of a book than Tolkin's. Tolkin clearly is on the defensive. What is he afraid of? It would behoove Tolkin to refrain from reviewing a review (of his movie "The Rapture") and to cohere to the object of his review. JOSEPH G. SMITH WHITTIER
NEWS
November 6, 2012 | By James Rainey
Every presidential campaign leaves a few indelible moments. Some can be game changers. Others go down as nothing more than odd non sequiturs. The Politics Now crew brings you nine moments we won't soon forget: YOU DIDN'T BUILD THAT :  One of President Obama's most inartful, or misinterpreted, moments came July 13 at a rally in Virginia. In full context, fact checkers said, the president made clear he was talking about how America could accomplish some big goals only through collective action.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2012 | By Glenn Whipp
Paul Thomas Anderson's highly anticipated “The Master” screened for the second time publicly last night in Chicago at a hastily arranged benefit for the nonprofit Film Foundation. And the immediate reactions - rapture, admiration, befuddlement - mirrored those following the film's pop-up presentation at Santa Monica's Aero Theatre on Aug. 3. Then again, as A.V. Club film critic Scott Tobias, who saw the movie at Chicago's Music Box last night, tweeted: “One more thing about 'The Master:' It's comically resistant to instant reaction.
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