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Rapunzel

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BUSINESS
March 9, 2010 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski and Claudia Eller
Disney is wringing the pink out of its princess movies. After the less-than-fairy-tale results for its most recent animated release, "The Princess and the Frog," executives at the Burbank studio believe they know why the acclaimed movie came up short at the box office. Brace yourself: Boys didn't want to see a movie with "princess" in the title. This time, Disney is taking measures to ensure that doesn't happen again. The studio renamed its next animated film with the girl-centric name "Rapunzel" to the less gender-specific "Tangled."
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2014 | By Jevon Phillips
A new princess is introduced in "The Tower" episode of "Once Upon a Time," but singing birds and glass slippers are replaced by scary, black robe-wearing creatures as we say hello to Rapunzel. The episode starts off with a nightmare in the past (during the missing year). Prince Charming, seeing the room and the crib where he and Snow once laid baby Emma Swan to sleep, turns to see a grown up Emma dressed like a princess. She asks Charming to teach her how to dance -- it's a sweet daughter-daddy moment -- until it's not. She's violently pulled away into the cabinet that transported her to our world.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2014 | By Jevon Phillips
A new princess is introduced in "The Tower" episode of "Once Upon a Time," but singing birds and glass slippers are replaced by scary, black robe-wearing creatures as we say hello to Rapunzel. The episode starts off with a nightmare in the past (during the missing year). Prince Charming, seeing the room and the crib where he and Snow once laid baby Emma Swan to sleep, turns to see a grown up Emma dressed like a princess. She asks Charming to teach her how to dance -- it's a sweet daughter-daddy moment -- until it's not. She's violently pulled away into the cabinet that transported her to our world.
NEWS
November 2, 2012 | By Chris Erskine and Adam Tschorn
Editor's Note: True beauty knows no boundaries, so we asked staffers Adam Tschorn and Chris Erskine to try out a new product aimed at removing pesky nose hair. Nad's Nose Wax for Men & Women, recently launched in Australia and available in the U.S. online, is designed to be used once a month, unlike hair trimmers, which often must be employed more frequently. That's convenient. But waxing inside the nose? Ouch! Luckily, the guys were intrepid. And they lived to talk about it: Chris: I am struck by [developer]
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2010 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
For "Tangled," the studio's 50th feature-length cartoon, the team at Disney has taken a deep breath and tried to be all things to all animation-loving people. There are some hiccups along the way, but by the end there is success. Whether you like stirring adventure or sentimental romance, traditional fairy tales or stories of modern families, musicals or comedies, even blonds or brunets, "Tangled" has something for you. Sampling so many animation touchstones has its risks, but once "Tangled" calms down and accepts the essential sweetness of its better nature the rewards are clear.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2012 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
When Chris Colfer was just 20, he'd already been named one of GQ magazine's men of the year, having sung and acted his way into the hearts of America as Kurt, the high-pitched, openly gay brunet who is unabashedly himself on the hit TV show "Glee. " Colfer's star had risen so fast in the year he'd starred on the Fox comedy that a literary agent asked him to pen his autobiography - an endeavor Colfer had the good sense to decline because it was so premature. Instead, Colfer offered "The Land of Stories: The Wishing Spell" (Little, Brown: 448 pp., $17.99 ages 8 and up)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
There's no other way to say it: Pascal was just a party pooper. After a few early test screenings, Disney animators knew things weren't working with the chameleon character in the new animated musical "Tangled," which opens Nov. 24. "We weren't getting enough entertainment out of Pascal," admits supervising animator Lino DiSalvo. "Animation-wise, originally, he was very realistic. He moved like a real chameleon, his eyes would move independently. " And while that's fine for fans of the bug-eyed reptiles, this particular creature just wasn't giving off the right vibe for a princess movie.
HOME & GARDEN
February 2, 2006 | Chris Erskine
IT'S A WINDY WINTER night, and the gusts send a low hum through the attic, as if Mother Nature is drawing a bass fiddle bow across the roof line. "That's a concert G," I tell my wife. "What is?" "That hum," I say. "I think it's a G. Or a G sharp." "Or an H," she says. "There is no H," I say. "Not yet," she says. We are in bed, a bunch of us -- me, my first wife, a couple of kids, a couple of dogs. A cat of questionable character. That's seven in all.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2012 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
The Hero's Guide to Saving Your Kingdom A Novel Christopher Healy HarperCollins: 432 pp., $16.99, ages 8 and up Whether it's Cinderella or Snow White, Rapunzel or Sleeping Beauty, princes play a key role in the happily ever afters of fairy tales. But what happens once these dashing young lads have swooped in to save their distressed damsels? What if, as Christopher Healy theorizes with his cheeky middle-grade debut, these princes turned out to be insufferable losers?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1987 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
"Into the Woods" opened on Broadway Thursday night. The first act of Stephen Sondheim and James Lapine's fairy-tale musical is even more dazzling than it was a year ago at San Diego's Old Globe Theater--and the second act is, alas, even more of a letdown. One big difference--and all to the good--is the hiring of Bernadette Peters to play the wicked witch. Peters is adorably maleficent, quite the most satisfactory thing in this line since Margaret Hamilton melted.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2012 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
When Chris Colfer was just 20, he'd already been named one of GQ magazine's men of the year, having sung and acted his way into the hearts of America as Kurt, the high-pitched, openly gay brunet who is unabashedly himself on the hit TV show "Glee. " Colfer's star had risen so fast in the year he'd starred on the Fox comedy that a literary agent asked him to pen his autobiography - an endeavor Colfer had the good sense to decline because it was so premature. Instead, Colfer offered "The Land of Stories: The Wishing Spell" (Little, Brown: 448 pp., $17.99 ages 8 and up)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2012 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
The Hero's Guide to Saving Your Kingdom A Novel Christopher Healy HarperCollins: 432 pp., $16.99, ages 8 and up Whether it's Cinderella or Snow White, Rapunzel or Sleeping Beauty, princes play a key role in the happily ever afters of fairy tales. But what happens once these dashing young lads have swooped in to save their distressed damsels? What if, as Christopher Healy theorizes with his cheeky middle-grade debut, these princes turned out to be insufferable losers?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2010 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
For "Tangled," the studio's 50th feature-length cartoon, the team at Disney has taken a deep breath and tried to be all things to all animation-loving people. There are some hiccups along the way, but by the end there is success. Whether you like stirring adventure or sentimental romance, traditional fairy tales or stories of modern families, musicals or comedies, even blonds or brunets, "Tangled" has something for you. Sampling so many animation touchstones has its risks, but once "Tangled" calms down and accepts the essential sweetness of its better nature the rewards are clear.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
There's no other way to say it: Pascal was just a party pooper. After a few early test screenings, Disney animators knew things weren't working with the chameleon character in the new animated musical "Tangled," which opens Nov. 24. "We weren't getting enough entertainment out of Pascal," admits supervising animator Lino DiSalvo. "Animation-wise, originally, he was very realistic. He moved like a real chameleon, his eyes would move independently. " And while that's fine for fans of the bug-eyed reptiles, this particular creature just wasn't giving off the right vibe for a princess movie.
BUSINESS
March 9, 2010 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski and Claudia Eller
Disney is wringing the pink out of its princess movies. After the less-than-fairy-tale results for its most recent animated release, "The Princess and the Frog," executives at the Burbank studio believe they know why the acclaimed movie came up short at the box office. Brace yourself: Boys didn't want to see a movie with "princess" in the title. This time, Disney is taking measures to ensure that doesn't happen again. The studio renamed its next animated film with the girl-centric name "Rapunzel" to the less gender-specific "Tangled."
HOME & GARDEN
February 2, 2006 | Chris Erskine
IT'S A WINDY WINTER night, and the gusts send a low hum through the attic, as if Mother Nature is drawing a bass fiddle bow across the roof line. "That's a concert G," I tell my wife. "What is?" "That hum," I say. "I think it's a G. Or a G sharp." "Or an H," she says. "There is no H," I say. "Not yet," she says. We are in bed, a bunch of us -- me, my first wife, a couple of kids, a couple of dogs. A cat of questionable character. That's seven in all.
NEWS
November 2, 2012 | By Chris Erskine and Adam Tschorn
Editor's Note: True beauty knows no boundaries, so we asked staffers Adam Tschorn and Chris Erskine to try out a new product aimed at removing pesky nose hair. Nad's Nose Wax for Men & Women, recently launched in Australia and available in the U.S. online, is designed to be used once a month, unlike hair trimmers, which often must be employed more frequently. That's convenient. But waxing inside the nose? Ouch! Luckily, the guys were intrepid. And they lived to talk about it: Chris: I am struck by [developer]
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1986 | DAN SULLIVAN
Stephen Sondheim writing about Little Red Riding Hood. Can you wait? Sondheim and James Lapine probably wish they could try out their new musical, "Into the Woods," in the woods, before a audience that has never heard of Stephen Sondheim. Barring that, they've chosen San Diego's Balboa Park, where "Into the Woods" will have its world premiere Thursday at the Old Globe Theatre. After that it will go to Broadway--but nobody's saying how soon.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2004 | Bernadette Murphy, Special to The Times
The Brothers Grimm got it right nearly 200 years ago in their fairy tale: Once upon a time, women were defined by their hair and captive to those who would control them by its allure. Hair was a tool a woman wielded to land a man; without radiant locks, she might well have to abandon hope of wedded bliss. What happened, after all, to Rapunzel when the sorceress cut off her famous mane? She was separated from her prince.
NEWS
August 7, 2003 | Lynne Heffley, Times Staff Writer
Occidental Children's Theater and Garry Marshall's Falcon Theatre in Burbank offer contrasting styles with their summer productions. With "Goldilocks and the Three Tenors," Occidental scores high marks for its imagination-celebrating romp at its once-a-year outdoor event in Eagle Rock. Meanwhile, the sleek, year-round professionalism of Falcon makes the most of less challenging, stereotypical "kiddie theater" fare in a comic "Rapunzel."
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