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OPINION
May 5, 1991
I am writing as the president of the John Bruckman Committee, the group that supports the rare book collection at the Central Library of Los Angeles, in regard to the article published on April 17. I would like to clarify two points made in the article. First, it was not made clear that the money used to purchase the ornithology books, which consisted of both rare and common titles, is part of the $10 million that was raised to rebuild and enhance the collections lost in the disastrous fires of 1986.
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NEWS
March 13, 2014 | By Stacey Leasca
Do you spend a copious amount of time on Wikipedia? Harvard might have a job for you. Harvard's Houghton Library, home to the school's collection of rare books, is looking to fill a newly created job : Wikipedian in residence.  (And at $16 an hour, it beats what you make editing for Wikipedia, which is zero .) This individual will help populate pages on Wikipedia with some of the library's material. PHOTOS: Celebrity majors “Wikipedia is an important resource for folks at Harvard and folks all around the world,” John Overholt, Houghton's curator of early modern books and manuscripts, told the L.A. Times.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Two first-edition copies of the Book of Mormon were among a dozen rare books that could be worth more than $100,000 stolen from a Salt Lake City museum, authorities said. The theft at Pioneer Memorial Museum on Capitol Hill was discovered early Wednesday. Investigators believe someone used a hammer to shatter a glass case where the books were stored, said Lt. Tony Garcia of the Utah Department of Public Safety.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
It is hard to imagine a more gentlemanly trade than the buying and selling of old books. The very word "antiquarian" evokes tweedy, bespectacled fellows moving between dusty shelves to pull down some esoteric intellectual treasure. But as Travis McDade shows in "Thieves of Book Row," book dealing in the early 20th century was rife with scoundrels and rogues. Book prices soared in the 1920s, then plummeted in the Great Depression, "when a difficult industry was made nearly impossible," McDade writes.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
The digital era has been good for old books, an expert in rare books said earlier this week. Matthew Haley, head of rare books and manuscripts at the Bonhams auction house in London, said that news of rare books moves faster and wider than ever before and that this is driving up prices at the high end of the book market, while Internet shopping was helping the lower end. When a new treasure is discovered, "More people can find it and there is...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 2010 | By Sam Allen, Los Angeles Times
Tom Lolis, who studies English literature, was looking through volumes of religious writings at the William Andrews Clark Memorial Library last fall when he came across something unexpected. It was a manuscript by British theologian John Portage, written around 1660. Portage's work has been much studied by scholars, including Lolis. But here was a document that none of them knew existed. "I kind of lucked out," said Lolis, who is working on a post-doctoral fellowship at the library.
NEWS
December 17, 1987
UCLA purchased seven rare books at the recent auction of prized volumes from the Estelle Doheny Collection, library officials announced. The books, all printed before 1501, include a work by St. Thomas Aquinas printed in Italy in 1470 and four volumes printed in Venice, Italy, in the late 1400s. The books will become part of the UCLA Library's Ahmanson-Murphy Collection of the First Century of Italian Printing, which contains more than 1,000 volumes.
NEWS
January 23, 1994
David Kirschenbaum, 99, one of the country's foremost dealers in rare books and manuscripts. His holdings included George Washington's copy of "The Federalist" and the log of the Enola Gay, the airplane that dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima. He owned a number of bookstores over the years but much of his business was carried out at Gino's, a restaurant in New York City where he worked and ate over nearly five decades. In New York City on Wednesday.
NEWS
February 18, 1988
Honnold Library of the Claremont Colleges has received a collection of 3,000 rare books dating back to the mid-1500s, a gift from Walter Lindley and F. Haynes Lindley Jr. Their grandfather, Dr. Walter Lindley, a Los Angeles civic leader at the turn of the century, collected most of the books, including 29 scrapbooks documenting early Los Angeles history.
NEWS
June 9, 1989 | ELIZABETH VENANT, Times Staff Writer
With a divining rod instinct for investment, art collectors are eyeing books the way a Forty-Niner would have ogled a flash of gold in a pan of dirt. Consider the book bash that began at Sotheby's in New York Tuesday night--the start of a five-part, one-year sale of the library of H. Bradley Martin, one of the finest private libraries in the country. The star of Round 1, which ended Thursday and featured ornithological books, was a huge, pristine double elephant folio of Audubon's "The Birds of America," a work the auction house's assistant director of rare books and manuscripts, Jay Dillon, calls "an icon of American art."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
The digital era has been good for old books, an expert in rare books said earlier this week. Matthew Haley, head of rare books and manuscripts at the Bonhams auction house in London, said that news of rare books moves faster and wider than ever before and that this is driving up prices at the high end of the book market, while Internet shopping was helping the lower end. When a new treasure is discovered, "More people can find it and there is...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 2012 | By Matt Stevens, Los Angeles Times
The children's section offers the standard selection of Hardy Boys. Across the store, a shelf marked "Classics" carries more of the usual fare, including a range of work by Charles Dickens. But for a brick-and-mortar bookstore to survive today, the basics are not enough. So Clarey Rudd, owner of the new Bank of Books, Malibu, has learned to customize, and to cater to his clients in novel ways. On display near the front of his store is "50 Years of James Bond. " Inside are pictures of Pierce Brosnan, one of many celebrities who stop in from time to time.
NEWS
August 17, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Last week, Larry McMurtry's career as a book dealer took center stage. McMurtry is, of course, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of "Lonesome Dove" and dozens of other novels, including "The Last Picture Show," "Texasville" and "Terms of Endearment. " He's also familiar with Hollywood -- many of his books have been successfully adapted to film and in 2006, he won an Oscar for co-writing the screenplay of "Brokeback Mountain. " All that was set aside as McMurtry, who's been selling collectible books for 55 years, put 300,000 of them up for sale.
NEWS
August 8, 2012 | by Carolyn Kellogg
Larry McMurtry is known for writing books (and screenplays), but he is also a bookseller. For many years, McMurtry has collected and sold rare books from the town of Archer City, Texas. He has bookstores filled with hundreds of thousands of rare, antiquarian and collectible books. Friday, they go on sale. Most of them, anyway: McMurtry is auctioning the contents of several stores, save one . And it's keeping 150,000 books in stock. In addition to being a significant book collector and bookseller, McMurtry has a stunning publishing record and screenwriting career.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2012 | By Mike Boehm
A first edition of a 415-year-old atlas that includes what's said to be the earliest printed map of California is back in the hands of its owner, the National Library of Sweden, from which it had been purloined along with dozens of other rare books by one of the library's own department heads. Flemish cartographer Cornelius Wytfliet compiled the atlas, which is the earliest book of maps devoted strictly to the New World. A news conference to announce its return - - and to generate attention that could produce leads to the whereabouts of the 55 other books that remain missing - - was held Wednesday at the office of a New York City law firm that's helping the Stockholm library, also known as the Royal Library, track down its missing volumes.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2012 | By Mike Boehm
A change is in store for the Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens' main display of its rare books, manuscripts, drawings, photography and other literary and historical  holdings -- including a Gutenberg Bible from the 1450s, a 1623 First Folio edition of Shakespeare's plays and a gigantic first edition copy of John James Audubon's “Birds of America.” The Huntington announced Wednesday that it will close the main exhibition...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1991
A city audit questioning the purchase of $400,000 worth of rare books for the Los Angeles Public Library was referred to the city librarian for review Thursday. At its regular meeting, the Board of Library Commissioners acknowledged it had received the audit, released last week by the City Administrative Office. Board President Sanford P. Paris said the commissioners will respond to the city librarian's recommendations concerning the report at a subsequent meeting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1986 | BILL BILLITER, Times Staff Writer
All 46 missing rare books and "irreplaceable" collector's items, including handwritten love letters by author-playwright George Bernard Shaw, returned to Cal State Fullerton's library on Monday just as mysteriously as they disappeared more than four months ago. "They came back by mail, in a package addressed to the library, on Monday morning," said Capt. Dan Byrnes, assistant director of public safety at the Fullerton campus.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2012 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
When my son Noah was little - no more than 2 years old - his favorite book was"Where the Wild Things Are"by Maurice Sendak, who died on Tuesday at age 83. We used to read it and reread it, every night before bed. The routine was always the same: Noah would stand up against the slats of his crib and stare at the fabulous lushness of Sendak's drawings, while I not so much recited as intoned the text. Often, Noah would mouth the words along with me; although he couldn't yet read, he'd heard the story so many times he had it memorized.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
By the time Charles Dickens' career hit its stride, his serialized stories drove readers to distraction in their eagerness for the next monthly installment. In 1841, Americans crowded the docks in New York waiting for ships arriving from England to find out the fate of Little Nell in "The Old Curiosity Shop. " (It was, sadly, not good news.) Dickens 200 t h birthday was celebrated around the world on Tuesday; it included a breathtaking reading by Ralph Fiennes, who stars in an upcoming film version of "Great Expectations," and a wreath-laying on his grave in Westminster Abbey in London by Prince Charles.
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