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BUSINESS
December 28, 2010 | Reuters
China announced Tuesday that it will cut its export quotas for rare earth minerals by more than 11% in the first half of 2011, further shrinking supplies of metals needed to make a range of high-tech products after Beijing slashed quotas for 2010. China produces about 97% of rare earth elements, used worldwide in high technology, clean energy and other products that exploit their special properties for magnetism, luminescence and strength. The rare earth issue may further strain relations between China and the United States, which have been battered this year by arguments over everything from Tibet and Taiwan to the value of the Chinese currency.
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BUSINESS
March 26, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez
The World Trade Organization on Wednesday said that China's restrictions on the exports of rare earths -- raw materials commonly used in the manufacturing of electronics -- violate trade rules. China had argued that the restrictions, which included export duties and quotas, were in place to conserve exhaustible natural resources, but other countries disagreed. The United States two years ago complained to the World Trade Organization about the restrictions, arguing that they artificially raised the prices of rare earths for other countries and gave preferable pricing to Chinese manufacturers.
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BUSINESS
February 20, 2011 | Tiffany Hsu
In the Mojave Desert just off Interstate 15 on the way to Las Vegas, workers are digging for dirt that may be worth far more than a casino full of chips. The massive hole is about to get even bigger. Molycorp Inc., which owns the open mine, plans to dig out about 40,000 tons of dirt a year by 2014, up 1,200% from the current rate of about 3,000 tons. The Colorado company is boosting production to meet an insatiable global appetite for rare earth elements ? minerals that have become a hot commodity because they're used in all kinds of electronics, including smart phone touch screens, wind turbines and fuel cells.
BUSINESS
January 22, 2013 | By Frank Shyong, Los Angeles Times
A group of private entrepreneurs is raising $20 million to fund the first stage of a mission to identify asteroids close to Earth and mine them for valuable materials. Deep Space Industries plans to launch three small crafts armed with cameras, called Fireflies, on an asteroid discovery mission as early as 2015. Three more spacecrafts, called Dragonflies, are expected to launch in 2016 to collect samples to be evaluated for mining potential. Planetary Resources, a Seattle company that launched its asteroid-mining operation last year, is developing a space telescope for spaceflight soon.
BUSINESS
October 20, 2010 | By David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
China on Wednesday denied reports it would slash exports of rare-earth elements next year, saying it was still formulating a plan to protect its supply of the valuable material needed in advanced industrial products. The Chinese Ministry of Commerce was responding to an article published in the state-owned China Daily that reported Beijing would tighten its virtual monopoly on rare earths by cutting exports 30% in 2011. Despite the denial, the ministry defended China's right to restrict sales of rare earths overseas, a years-old policy that has unnerved foreign countries that rely on the material to make wind turbines, electric cars and state-of-the-art weaponry.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1995 | DENNIS HUNT
With its unique blend of Motown-style soul and rock, this band, which thrived in the early, early '70s, made some tracks that can still give funk fans goose bumps. The heart of this two-disc set is covers of Motown oldies, like "Get Ready," and tracks from its 1974 album, "Ma"--considered a classic in funk-rock circles.
BUSINESS
October 14, 2009 | Martin Zimmerman
Fear of a shortage of rare-earth metals used in high-tech military and industrial products has spawned global efforts to reopen abandoned mines, including the formidable Mountain Pass Mine in California's Mojave Desert. Discovered in the 1940s by uranium prospectors, Mountain Pass contains an array of rare earths, including cerium and lanthanum, in concentrations almost double those found at the world's biggest rare-earth mine, China's Bayan Obo. "You're looking at the greatest rare-earth deposit in the world," says operations manager John Benfield as he ushers a visitor around the 2,200-acre site 60 miles southwest of Las Vegas.
WORLD
September 23, 2010 | By John M. Glionna and David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
A day after China's premier warned that his nation would punish Japan if it did not release a detained Chinese fishing boat captain, Beijing on Thursday cut off exports of minerals to Japan that are used in such products as hybrid cars, according to a media report that was later denied by Chinese officials. In recent days, Chinese officials have raised continuing alarm over Japan's holding of the trawler captain, whose boat collided two weeks ago with Japanese coast guard vessels near a chain of islands in the East China Sea that are claimed by both nations.
NEWS
March 13, 2012 | By Christi Parsons
President Obama on Tuesday morning launched a challenge to China's export restrictions on rare earth and other raw materials as part of a broader effort to free up supply lines to global high-tech industries. The U.S. will join with the European Union and Japan in pressing the case with the World Trade Organization, in hopes that it can pressure Chinese officials to relax restrictions during preliminary consultations over the next two months. "We've got to take control of our energy future and we cannot let that energy industry take root in some other country because they were allowed to break the rules," Obama told reporters in the White House Rose Garden.
OPINION
October 6, 2010 | By Eric J. Weiner
Can anyone talk to China anymore? It's an increasingly important question for the United States and the rest of the world to ponder as the emerging giant asserts itself globally. The House voted overwhelmingly last week to give President Obama sweeping authority to impose steep tariffs on Chinese imports. The move was aimed at retaliating against Beijing's monetary policy, which essentially keeps the value of the nation's currency artificially low so Chinese manufacturers can dump cheap exports on developed economies.
BUSINESS
April 24, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan and Scott Gold, Los Angeles Times
A group of 21st-century private space entrepreneurs is expected to unveil an ambitious new venture to mine the surface of near-Earth asteroids in search of precious metals and rare metallic elements. The plan may seem like it was torn from a science fiction novel, and critics say the idea may be far-fetched and difficult for a small company to accomplish. But the company, Planetary Resources Inc., has already drawn an A-list of investors and advisors. The backers include Google Inc. Chief Executive Larry Page and Chairman Eric Schmidt, "Avatar" director James Cameron and Microsoft Corp.'s former chief software architect Charles Simonyi.
BUSINESS
March 14, 2012 | By Don Lee and Christi Parsons, Los Angeles Times
Stepping up trade pressure on China in an election year, the Obama administration took the first step with the World Trade Organization in trying to force the Chinese to halt their export restrictions of rare earths — minerals that are vital to such products as hybrid vehicles and smartphones. The move by the United States was joined by the European Union and Japan but was seen by analysts as having relatively little economic punch because of the long delay in bringing the matter to the WTO. In announcing the action, President Obama cast it as a fight to defend America's manufacturing and energy security.
BUSINESS
March 13, 2012 | By David Pierson
China's state media warned Tuesday that U.S. plans to press Beijing through the World Trade Organization over its control of special industrial minerals known as rare earths could trigger a backlash and sully bilateral relations. The official New China News Agency said in a commentary that China's export quotas were aimed at protecting its resources and environment in accordance with WTO rules. "It is rash and unfair for the United States to put forward a lawsuit against China before the WTO, which may hurt economic relations between the world's largest and second-largest economies," the commentary said.
NEWS
March 13, 2012 | By Christi Parsons
President Obama on Tuesday morning launched a challenge to China's export restrictions on rare earth and other raw materials as part of a broader effort to free up supply lines to global high-tech industries. The U.S. will join with the European Union and Japan in pressing the case with the World Trade Organization, in hopes that it can pressure Chinese officials to relax restrictions during preliminary consultations over the next two months. "We've got to take control of our energy future and we cannot let that energy industry take root in some other country because they were allowed to break the rules," Obama told reporters in the White House Rose Garden.
BUSINESS
February 20, 2011 | Tiffany Hsu
In the Mojave Desert just off Interstate 15 on the way to Las Vegas, workers are digging for dirt that may be worth far more than a casino full of chips. The massive hole is about to get even bigger. Molycorp Inc., which owns the open mine, plans to dig out about 40,000 tons of dirt a year by 2014, up 1,200% from the current rate of about 3,000 tons. The Colorado company is boosting production to meet an insatiable global appetite for rare earth elements ? minerals that have become a hot commodity because they're used in all kinds of electronics, including smart phone touch screens, wind turbines and fuel cells.
BUSINESS
December 28, 2010 | Reuters
China announced Tuesday that it will cut its export quotas for rare earth minerals by more than 11% in the first half of 2011, further shrinking supplies of metals needed to make a range of high-tech products after Beijing slashed quotas for 2010. China produces about 97% of rare earth elements, used worldwide in high technology, clean energy and other products that exploit their special properties for magnetism, luminescence and strength. The rare earth issue may further strain relations between China and the United States, which have been battered this year by arguments over everything from Tibet and Taiwan to the value of the Chinese currency.
SPORTS
June 18, 2006 | Houston Mitchell
CASEY HOORELBEKE, P Jacksonville; double A Hoorelbeke, born in Torrance, was signed by the Dodgers as a non-drafted free agent from Idaho's Lewis-Clark State in 2003. A reliever, Hoorelbeke has an 0.24 earned-run average in 38 innings, striking out 30 and holding the opposition to a .146 batting average while earning six saves in 27 appearances. The big drawback to him is his age, 26, making him a little old to be a real prospect.
BUSINESS
January 22, 2013 | By Frank Shyong, Los Angeles Times
A group of private entrepreneurs is raising $20 million to fund the first stage of a mission to identify asteroids close to Earth and mine them for valuable materials. Deep Space Industries plans to launch three small crafts armed with cameras, called Fireflies, on an asteroid discovery mission as early as 2015. Three more spacecrafts, called Dragonflies, are expected to launch in 2016 to collect samples to be evaluated for mining potential. Planetary Resources, a Seattle company that launched its asteroid-mining operation last year, is developing a space telescope for spaceflight soon.
BUSINESS
October 20, 2010 | By David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
China on Wednesday denied reports it would slash exports of rare-earth elements next year, saying it was still formulating a plan to protect its supply of the valuable material needed in advanced industrial products. The Chinese Ministry of Commerce was responding to an article published in the state-owned China Daily that reported Beijing would tighten its virtual monopoly on rare earths by cutting exports 30% in 2011. Despite the denial, the ministry defended China's right to restrict sales of rare earths overseas, a years-old policy that has unnerved foreign countries that rely on the material to make wind turbines, electric cars and state-of-the-art weaponry.
OPINION
October 6, 2010 | By Eric J. Weiner
Can anyone talk to China anymore? It's an increasingly important question for the United States and the rest of the world to ponder as the emerging giant asserts itself globally. The House voted overwhelmingly last week to give President Obama sweeping authority to impose steep tariffs on Chinese imports. The move was aimed at retaliating against Beijing's monetary policy, which essentially keeps the value of the nation's currency artificially low so Chinese manufacturers can dump cheap exports on developed economies.
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